Future Exhibitions and Installations

The Getty Center

  • The Renaissance Nude

    October 30, 2018–January 27, 2019

    Inspired by a renewed interest in classical sculpture and closer study of nature, Renaissance artists made the nude body ever more vibrant, lifelike, and central to their practice. Yet, pious European Renaissance society was troubled by the nude and its new sensuality—a conflicted response echoed in the world today, where images of nudity have become ubiquitous. This exhibition, with more than 100 objects by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Dürer, and others, traces the nude’s controversial emergence and its transformative effect on European art and culture.

  • Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings

    November 16, 2018–February 10, 2019

    The first major international exhibition of the work of American photographer Sally Mann. The exhibition explores themes of family, memory, mortality, and the Southern landscape as repository of personal and collective memory. Experimental, melancholic, and hauntingly beautiful, Mann’s photographs – many not exhibited before – expose how her relationship with the land has shaped her work and how the legacy of the South continues to permeate American identity. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts.

  • Monumentality

    December 4, 2018–April 21, 2019

    Monumentality evokes an aura of greatness, a sense of power and gravity that demands public recognition. As markers of history and repositories of collective memory, monuments can project multiple and sometimes contradictory meanings. Monuments might outlast their original purpose, meet their demise through violent conflict or artistic intervention, or simply become forgotten in the fabric of everyday life. This exhibition investigates various paradigms of monumentality, prompting viewers to consider why certain monuments endure and others fall.

  • Spectacular Mysteries: Renaissance Drawings Revealed

    December 11, 2018–Ongoing

    Comprising spectacular drawings from the Getty collection and rarely-seen works from private collections, this exhibition reveals the detective work involved in investigating master drawings. Many Italian Renaissance drawings tell stories of their creation and the purposes they served, yet sometimes even the most seemingly simple question - who drew it? - is a mystery. Discover what we know and don't know, what we'd like to know, and what we may never discover about these intriguing works of art and their world.

  • Artful Words: Calligraphy in Illuminated Manuscripts

    December 18, 2018–April 7, 2019

    The written word was an art form in the premodern world. Calligraphers filled the pages of manuscripts with scrolling vines and delicate pen flourishes, and illuminators depicted captivating narratives within large letterforms. These decorative embellishments reveal the monetary, cultural, and spiritual value placed on handmade books at the time. The alphabetic adornments in this exhibition enliven the content of a range of manuscripts-including sacred scripture, romance literature, and history-produced from England to Ethiopia over nearly one thousand years.

The Getty Villa

  • Underworld: Imagining the Afterlife

    October 31, 2018–March 18, 2019

    What did ancient Greeks believe would happen to them after they died? Organized around a monumental funerary vessel, on loan from National Archaeological Museum in Naples and recently conserved at the Getty Villa, this exhibition explores depictions of the Underworld in the art of Greece and southern Italy. Beyond tales of famous wrongdoers and rulers of the dead, the works on view highlight the desire for a blessed existence after death and the ways in which individuals sought to achieve a happier afterlife..