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Current Exhibition


 
The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930
September 16, 2017–January 7, 2018
Getty Research Institute, Galleries I and II

Over the course of a century of rapid urban growth, sociopolitical upheavals and cultural transitions reshaped the architectural landscapes of major cities in Latin America. Focusing on six capitals—Buenos Aires, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, and Santiago de Chile—The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930, presents the colonial city as a terrain shaped by Iberian urban regulations, and the republican city as an arena of negotiation of previously imposed and newly imported models, which were later challenged by waves of indigenous revivals. Photographs, prints, plans, and maps depict the urban impact of key societal and economic transformations, including the emergence of a bourgeois elite, extensive infrastructure projects, rapid industrialization, and commercialization.

This exhibition is organized by the Getty Research Institute in conjunction with Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA. Explore all four Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA exhibitions at the Getty Center.

Image: The City of the Future: Hundred Story City in Neo-American Style, Francisco Mujica, 1929. From Francisco Mujica, History of the Skyscraper (Paris, 1929), pl. 134. 88-B34645


Online Exhibition


 
The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra
ONLINE ONLY

War in Syria has irrevocably changed the ancient caravan city of Palmyra, famed as a meeting place of civilizations since its apogee in the mid-2nd to 3rd century CE. The Romans and Parthians knew Palmyra as a wealthy oasis metropolis, a center of culture and trade on the edge of their empires. For centuries, traveling artists and explorers have documented the site in former states of preservation. This online exhibition captures the site as it was photographed for the first time by Louis Vignes in 1864 and illustrated in the 18th century by the architect Louis-François Cassas. Their works contribute to Palmyra's legacy, one that goes far beyond the stones of its once great buildings.

Image: Temple of Bel, cella entrance (detail), Jean Baptiste Réville and Pierre Gabriel Berthault after Louis-François Cassas, 1799. From Voyage pittoresque de la Syrie, de la Phoénicie, de la Palestine, et de la Basse Egypte (Paris, 1799), vol. 1, pl. 46. The Getty Research Institute, 840011


Events


 
Symposium
Encounters, Utopias, and Experimentation: From Pre-Columbian Tenochtitlan to Contemporary Buenos Aires
Day 1: November 3, 2017
Day 2: November 4, 2017
Day 3: November 5, 2017



 
Keynote
Khipu, Body, Line: A Writing in Space
November 4, 2017






 
 
Symposium
Indigenous Knowledge and the Making of the Colonial Latin America
Day 1: December 8, 2017
Day 2: December 9, 2017