Future Exhibitions and Installations

The Getty Center

  • Finding Form

    December 12, 2017–February 11, 2018

    Line by line and layer by layer, an artist conjures a three-dimensional world from a two-dimensional sheet of paper. Through an array of media and techniques—hatched ink lines, varying densities of wash, white chalk highlights—these draftsmen generate form, likeness, and depth, yielding an arresting presence. Featuring celebrated masterworks from the 1500s to the 1800s, all from the Getty's permanent collection, this focused exhibition demonstrates how artists have performed this magic across time and place.

  • Robert Polidori: 20 Photographs of the Getty Museum, 1997

    December 12, 2017–May 6, 2018

    Acclaimed photographer Robert Polidori (Canadian-French-American, born 1951), known for his images of architecture and human habitats, created a series of images of the Getty Center shortly before the opening of the multipurpose complex in 1997. Organized to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the Center, this exhibition features captivating behind-the-scenes views of the building and the new galleries as objects from J. Paul Getty's painting, sculpture, and decorative arts collections were being installed in the Museum.

  • Pastels in Pieces

    January 16–July 29, 2018

    European paper was not manufactured in giant sheets until the nineteenth century. Competing with painters who worked on monumental canvases, eighteenth-century pastellists joined together multiple sheets of paper in order to create large, continuous surfaces. The piecing together of pastels, however, also served other purposes, allowing artists to paper over their mistakes or paste the heads of important sitters onto bodies posed by models. Matching each exhibited pastel with a map of its component sheets, this installation encourages visitors to consider how these objects were made.

  • Michelangelo to Degas: Major New Acquisitions

    January 17–April 22, 2018

    The Museum recently made one of the most spectacular acquisitions in its history, purchasing a collection of sixteen drawings from a private collector. The group features exceptional sheets by many of the most celebrated draftsmen in European art history, including Michelangelo, Andrea del Sarto, Domenico Tiepolo, Goya, and Degas. This exhibition presents the drawings together with an exquisite painting by Antoine Watteau, La Surprise, acquired from the same celebrated collection.

  • A Queen's Treasure from Versailles: Marie-Antoinette's Japanese Lacquer{VER}

    January 23, 2018–January 6, 2019

    A Queen's Treasure brings to the Getty precious examples of Japanese lacquer from the personal collection of the French queen Marie-Antoinette (1755–1793). Her collection of small lacquer boxes was one of the finest assembled in Europe, and she considered them to be among her most cherished possessions. The elaborate and costly works reveal a fascinating example of the queen's sophisticated taste and demonstrate the consistent level of achievement attained by Japanese lacquer artists during the mid-Edo period (about 1681–1764) when these pieces were created.

  • Outcasts: Prejudice and Persecution in the Medieval World

    January 30–April 8, 2018

    Medieval manuscripts preserve stories of faith, romance, and knowledge, but their luxurious illuminations can reveal disturbing narratives as well. Often created for the privileged classes, such books nevertheless provide glimpses of the marginalized and powerless and reflect their tenuous place in society. Attitudes toward women, Jews and Muslims, the poor, those perceived as socially divergent, and foreign peoples beyond European borders can be discerned through caricature and polemical imagery as well as marks of erasure and censorship.

  • Harald Szeemann: Museum of Obsessions

    February 6–May 6, 2018

    Harald Szeemann: Museum of Obsessions explores the life and career of the quintessential exhibition maker, from his groundbreaking involvement with the avant-garde movements of the 1960s and 1970s and his global contemporary exhibitions of the 1990s and 2000s to his personal reading of early 20th-century modernism. Drawn from materials in the Harald Szeemann Archive at the Getty Research Institute, the exhibition is structured as a surprising series of thematic interests: avant-gardes, utopias and visionaries, geographies, and grandfathers.

    This exhibition features a satellite presentation, Grandfather: A Pioneer Like Us, on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (ICA LA) from February 4 to April 22, 2018.

  • Paper Promises: Early American Photography

    February 27–May 27, 2018

    Paper Promises traces mid-nineteenth-century experimentation with and exploitation of photography on paper. Rare photographs and negatives are featured alongside iconic images from the formative years of photography in the United States. The exhibition demonstrates the importance of photographic reproduction in shaping and circulating perceptions of America and its people during a critical period of political tension and territorial expansion.

  • Cut! Paper Play in Contemporary Photography

    February 27–May 27, 2018

    Interaction with paper plays an integral role in the practice of many photographers working today. Some create paper models with images gleaned from current events, popular magazines, or the internet for the express purpose of photographing them. Others cut, layer, fold, and/or assemble representational photographs to introduce tactile or narrative elements. The exhibition features works by Thomas Demand, Christiane Feser, Daniel Gordon, Soo Kim, Matt Lipps, and Christopher Russell.

  • Rembrandt and the Inspiration of India

    March 13–June 24, 2018

    One of the most intriguing series in Rembrandt's oeuvre comprises his drawings made in the style of artists serving the Mughal court in India. Juxtaposing Rembrandt's depictions of Mughal rulers and courtiers with Indian paintings and drawings of similar compositions, this exhibition reveals how contact with Mughal art inspired Rembrandt to draw in an entirely different, refined style prompted by his curiosity for a foreign culture.

  • Beyond the Nile: Egypt and the Classical World

    March 27–September 9, 2018

    Egypt, the most ancient of the Mediterranean civilizations, held a great fascination for the Greeks and Romans. This major international loan exhibition explores the artistic interplay between these cultures from the Bronze Age to Roman times (2000 BC–AD 300). The installation includes royal Egyptian stone vessels sent to Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece, Archaic Greek pottery and sculpture inspired by Egyptian models, superb portraits in Egyptian and Greek style created during Greek rule in Egypt, and remarkable religious images and luxury goods in made for Roman patrons in Italy.

  • Pathways to Paradise: Medieval India and Europe

    May 1–August 5, 2018

    The pages of medieval manuscripts reveal a dynamically interconnected world filled with real and imagined ideas about foreign peoples and places. Buddhists, Muslims, and Christians living across Europe and Asia conceived paradise as a place of perfect harmony, but the path for locating such a site or achieving this state of mind varied between these religions. By exploring the terrestrial and celestial realms, this exhibition highlights the spiritual motivations for creating and owning portable and devotional artworks.

  • In Focus: Expressions

    May 22–October 7, 2018

    The human face has been the subject of fascination for photographers since the medium’s inception. This exhibition includes posed portraits, physiognomic studies, anonymous snapshots, and unsuspecting countenances caught by the camera’s eye, offering a close-up look at the range of human stories that facial expressions—and photographs—can tell.

  • Icons of Style: A Century of Fashion Photography, 1911–2011

    June 26–October 21, 2018

    This exhibition surveys the rich and varied history of modern fashion photography, exploring the ways in which photographers whose careers have been closely associated with the industry have shaped evolving notions of style and beauty. Drawn from the Getty Museum's permanent collection and supplemented by loans from private and public sources, Icons of Style features more than two hundred photographs presented alongside a selection of costumes, illustrations, magazine covers, videos, and advertisements.

The Getty Villa

  • Plato in L.A.: Contemporary Artists' Visions

    April 18–September 3, 2018

    Plato is one of the founding figures of Western civilization. His legacy encompasses ethics, politics, theology, and poetics. In this exhibition at the Getty Villa, a museum exploring classical art and culture, some of today's most celebrated artists consider Plato's impact on the contemporary world. In the form of sculptures, paintings, drawings, and large-scale installations, they respond to his contribution to philosophy—from defining the ideal to understanding the human condition—while fostering the ultimate Platonic experience: contemplation.

  • Palmyra: Loss and Remembrance

    April 18, 2018–May 27, 2019

    Between the first and third centuries AD, the inhabitants of Palmyra, an ancient Syrian caravan city at the crossroads between the Roman and the Parthian empires, embellished their tombs with distinctive funerary portraits. These vivid likenesses of finely dressed men, women and children, often accompanied by inscriptions naming local families, illuminate cultural exchanges taking place in the eastern Mediterranean. This installation presents sculpture from the collections of the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen on long-term loan to the Getty alongside historical engravings and photographs from the Getty Research Institute.