The 2019/2020 scholar-year theme invites scholars to address the strategies and forms through which ecological concepts are generated, adopted, staged, and negotiated in the realm of the visual arts and architecture. The intersections of art and ecology raise important questions about how artistic practices have sought to understand our place in nature and the deep entanglements of natural and cultural formations throughout history. The terms are to be taken broadly: art as product, practice, or skill; and ecology as biological environment, built system, or metaphor for interdependence and connectivity.

From Paleolithic figurines to sculptural interventions in the landscape, or from sacred gardens to the golden ratio in architecture, ecological considerations in art range from the stylistic to the geopolitical, from the material to the philosophical. This multivalent discourse on art and ecology incorporates conservation efforts in the age of the Anthropocene as well as critical endeavors to decentralize the human in favor of the animal, the natural, or the post-human. At the same time, technological advances in archaeology, climate science, and the digital humanities are opening new pathways to ecological understanding and merit scholarly reflection.

Getty Scholars


Amanda Boetzkes is Associate Professor in the College of Arts at the University of Guelph, Canada. Her research focuses on theories of ecology and perception.
Ecologicity, Vision and Art for a World to Come
(April–June)

Alan Braddock is the Ralph H. Wark Associate Professor of Art History and American Studies at the College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia. His research focuses on American art and critical theory.
Implication: Theory and Practice in Ecocritical Art History
(September–June)

Mónica Domínguez Torres is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Delaware, Newark. Her research focuses on the early modern Iberian world.
Pearls for the Crown: European Courtly Art and the Atlantic Pearl Trade, 1498–1728
(September–March)

Julia Drost is Director of Research at Deutsches Forum für Kunstgeschichte, Paris, France. Her research focuses on the history of the avant-garde and art criticism.
Utopias and Dystopias of Nature. Ecological Thought in Surrealism
(September–June)

Laura Frahm is Associate Professor of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her research centers on film, media theory, architecture, and urbanism.
Nature is Design: Living Architectures, Organic Design, and Ecological Media after the Bauhaus
(September–June)

Nazar Kozak is Senior Researcher in the Department of Art History in the Ethnology Institute at the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lviv. A specialist in Byzantine and post-Byzantine art in Eastern Europe, his research focuses on contemporary art.
Surmounting the Chernobyl: Artistic Responses to Ecological Disaster
(September–December)

James Nisbet (Consortium Scholar) is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of California, Irvine. His research centers on modern and contemporary art and theory with an emphasis on environmental history and the history of photography.
Ecology against Modernism: Visual Media and the Vitality of Knowledge in the Transatlantic Nineteenth Century
(September–June)

Sugata Ray is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on South and Southeast Asian art and architecture.
Matter, Material, Materiality: Indian Ocean Art Histories in the Early Modern World, 1500–1800
(April–June)

Postdoctoral Fellows


Sophia Maxine Farmer received her PhD in art history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on Italian Modernism.
Il Naturismo Futurista: Fascism, Ecology, and Nature
(September–June)

Grace Kim received her PhD in History, Anthropology, and Science, Technology, and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge. Her research focuses on the anthropology of art and science.
Cultures on Culture: Biofilm, Conservation, and the Interface of Art and Environment
(September–June)

Camila Maroja is Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History & Communication Studies at McGill University, Canada. Her research focuses on modern and contemporary art with emphasis on Latin America.
Into the Amazon: Nature as a Model to Art
(September–June)

Jason Nguyen is a postdoctoral fellow in the USC Society of Fellows in the Humanities at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. His research focuses on the history of architecture.
Architecture in the Face of Disaster: Buildings, Cities, and Natural Catastrophe in the Seventeenth Century
(September–June)

Omar Olivares Sandoval received his PhD in art history at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.
Landscape Aesthetics and Humboldtean Science in the Americas: Félix Émile Taunay, Rafael Troya and José Maria Velasco
(September–June)

Predoctoral Fellow


Michaela Rife is a PhD candidate in the Department of History of Art at the University of Toronto, Canada.
Public Art, Private Land: Settler Colonialism, Art and Land Use on the Great Plains
(September–June)

Volkswagen Foundation Fellow


Jesús Muñoz Morcillo is a Research Associate and Lecturer at the Institut für Kunst- und Baugeschichte at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe, Germany.
Ecphrastic Ecology in Renaissance Visual Culture
(September–June)

Guest Scholars


Larry Coben is founder and Executive Director of the Sustainable Preservation Initiative. He was trained as an archaeologist and is a consulting scholar at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology.
Build Futures, Save Pasts: Heritage Preservation, Community, and Sustainable Development
(January–March)

T. J. Demos is Professor of History of Art and Visual Culture at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research focuses on modern and contemporary art in relation to ecology, globalization, and political conflicts.
Radical Futurisms: Contemporary Art, Political Ecology, and Worlds to Come
(April–June)

Denver Graninger (Villa) is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Riverside. His research focuses on the social and political implications of Greek religion.
Thracian Shatter Zones: Empires and Resistance
(January–June)

Kellie Jones is Professor of Art History and Archaeology at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies at Columbia University, New York. Her research focuses on modern and contemporary art of African American and African Diaspora artists, and of Latinx and Latin American artists.
Art is An Excuse, Conceptual Strategies
(January–June)

Barbara Murovec is Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Maribor, Slovenia. Her research focuses on collecting and patronage, provenance research, artistic migration, art and politics, historiography and methodology of art history.
Connecting Collecting and Provenance Research (Slovenia/Ex-Yugoslavia, Eastern Europe)
(September–December)

Tavares Strachan (Artist in Residence) is an independent artist based in New York. Strachan's ambitious and open-ended practice examines the intersection of art, science, and the environment, and has included collaborations with numerous organizations and institutions across these disciplines. His work has been featured in numerous solo exhibitions including Invisibles at Regen Projects, Always, Sometimes, Never at the Frye Art Museum, and the Bahamas National Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale.
Mapping Invisibility
(September–June)

Getty Rothschild Fellow


Pascal Bertrand is Professor of Art History at the Université Bordeaux Montaigne, France. He is a preeminent scholar of the history of tapestry whose fellowship focuses on a digital project related to the 18th-century pay registers of the Beauvais tapestry manufactory. Bertrand is the fourth recipient of the Getty Rothschild Fellowship.
(April–June)

President's International Council Scholars


Katherine Boo is an investigative journalist and New York Times best-selling author based in Washington, D.C. Her work documents the experiences of the disadvantaged populace.
Host Department: Office of the President
(January–June)

Sunil Khilnani is Professor of Politics and Director of King's College London India Institute, England. His research focuses on intellectual history and the study of political thought.
Host Department: Office of the President
(January–June)

Earl Powell III is Director Emeritus and the longest serving Director of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
Host Department: Office of the President
(February)

Connecting Art Histories Scholars


Vera Beatriz Siqueira is Senior Professor in the Department of History of Art at Rio de Janeiro State University, Brazil. She specializes in modern and contemporary art in Brazil.
Art and Nature: The Ecological Concept of Form of Roberto Burle Marx
(January–March)

Chen Liu is Associate Professor in the Department of Architecture at Tsinghua University, Beijing, China. She specializes in art, architecture, and urbanism in early modern Europe and the reception of the Renaissance in 20th-century China.
Renaissance in Reflection: A Comparative Study of Modern Chinese and Western Interpretations
(January–June)

Museum Guest Scholars


Desmond Shawe-Taylor is Surveyor of the Queen's Pictures in London, England.
Host Department: Paintings
(July–September)

Matthew Hayes is Director of the Pietro Edwards Society for Art Conservation, New York, New York.
Host Department: Paintings Conservation
(July–September)

Koenraad Brosens is Associate Professor and Chair of Art History at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium.
Host Department: Sculpture and Decorative Arts
(July–September)

Simone Porcinai is Director of Chemistry Laboratory II in the Opificio delle Pietre Dure at the Italian Ministry of Cultural Heritage, Florence, Italy.
Host Department: Decorative Arts Conservation
(September–December)

Anastasios Antonaras is Head of Exhibitions, Communication and Education and Curator of Ancient and Byzantine Glass Collection at the Museum of Byzantine Culture, Thessaloniki, Greece.
Host Department: Antiquities
(September–December)

Hinrich Sieveking is an independent scholar based in Munich, Germany.
Host Department: Drawings
(January–March)

Eva Hoffman is Assistant Professor of Art History at Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts.
Host Department: Manuscripts
(January–March)

Philip Brookman is Consulting Curator at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
Host Department: Photographs
(January–March)

Petya Penkova is Assistant Professor at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in Sofia, Bulgaria.
Host Department: Antiquities Conservation
(April–June)