Project Images
 
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Ruins of the Decapolis city of Gadara, today known as Umm Qais, overlooking the Sea of Galilee, also called Lake Tiberias, and the Golan Heights. Photo: Dennis Wuthrich

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The partially-restored reception hall of the Ummayad-era palace located at the Amman Citadel. Photo: David Myers

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Decorative mosaics are a common element of archaeological sites in Jordan. The 'Map Mosaic' dates from the 6th century AD and is located within the floor of the apse of the Basilica of St. George in Madaba. The mosaic is renowned as the oldest known floor map mosaic, and the oldest surviving original map of the Holy Land. It includes depictions of the Dead Sea and Jordan River, the Nile Delta, a detailed view of Jerusalem, and Bethlehem. Photo: Alison Dalgity

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The archaeological city of Gerasa (modern Jarash) at the beginning of the 20th century. The beginnings of the modern city of Jarash appear in the background, in the location of the residential area of the ancient city. Photo: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, LC-DIG-matpc-06966

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The remains of the ancient city of Gerasa continue today to exhibit the key elements of the Roman-era city plan, including the Oval Plaza (foreground) and Cardo, the colonnaded road leading to the north that served as the city's north-south axis. By comparison with the image of the area from approximately one century earlier, it is apparent how much the modern city of Jarash has grown over the archaeological remains of the residential area of the ancient city. A major challenge that the Jordanian Department of Antiquities currently faces is the protection of archaeological sites in the face of rapid development in many areas of Jordan. MEGA-J will serve as a tool to aid in the DoA's protection efforts. Photo: David Myers

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Members of the project team meet with inspectors from Jordan's Department of Antiquities (DoA) in Umm Qeis to learn of their specific requirements for the functionality of the system. Photo: Alison Dalgity

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During requirements gathering exercises at Jordan's Department of Antiquities (DoA) in Amman, small working groups were formed to discuss data collection criteria and specific terms that will be used in a standardized vocabulary for entering data into MEGA-J. Photo: Mario Santana

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Staff from Jordan's Department of Antiquities (DoA) learn to use advanced features of Google Earth™ to prepare archaeological site data for import into MEGA-J. Photo: Mario Santana

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After the requirements gathering phase, use cases are developed, which outline how specific groups of future users will interact with the system and how the system should respond to those actions. It then serves to ensure that each one of the identified actions is accommodated in the system design.

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Archaeologists and other professionals from the Department of Antiquities of Jordan (DoA) in Irbid, Jordan, learn various methods to electronically capture the boundaries of archaeological sites. In February 2008 work began to prepare data for eventual incorporation into MEGA-J. Photo: Alison Dalgity

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Inspectors from the Jordan's Department of Antiquities (DoA) using a GPS device and a draft version of the site card to collect coordinates of the boundary of a site and simultaneously review the suitability of the draft site card. Photo: Mario Santana

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Participants from the DoA engaging in a topographic map reading exercise during the 2007 workshop. The sessions were designed to help prepare DoA staff for data collection tasks for MEGA-J. Photo: Mona Hess

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Below the Amman citadel, standing amidst modern buildings, is a Roman theater seating up to 6,000 spectators. Photo: David Myers

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The most iconic image of an archaeological site in Jordan is likely that of Al-Khazneh (Arabic for 'treasury') of Petra, which was elaborately carved into a sandstone cliff between approximately 100AD and 200BC. It's name is in fact a misnomer, as the facade's extensive funerary symbols suggest that it was constructed as a tomb. Photo: Alison Dalgity

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Ancient roads are another common form of archaeological site found in Jordan, in this case a Roman road in the city of Madaba. Photo: David Myers

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A common type of archaeological site in Jordan, and in much of the Middle East region, is known as a "tall," which is a hill or mound formed usually by centuries or millinia of human occupation. Tall Hisban is seen in the background of this image. Photo: David Myers

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MEGA-Jordan will record multiple cultural periods of occupation of archaeological sites. Layers of stratigraphy uncovered through excavation, such as these shown at Tall Hisban, help to reveal those periods of occupation. Photo: David Myers

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Ruins of the great temple of Hercules (Herakles), constructed during the 2nd century AD, stand today at the site of the Amman citadel in the heart of the modern capital city of Amman, which during the Greco-Roman era was a Decapolis city known as Philadelphia. Photo: Alison Dalgity

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A significant element of the ancient city of Petra is known as the Great Temple, to the north of the Colonnaded Street. The complex was created in the 1st century AD and redesigned in the following century. Photo: Dennis Wuthrich

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The mosaic floor of the Byzantine-era Church of Saints Cosmas and Damian at the archaeological city of Jarash. Photo: David Myers

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A site card has been developed for recording new archaeological sites and site elements in MEGA-Jordan. This part of the site card is used specifically for recording new site elements. A monitoring card is also used for monitoring the condition of sites and site elements over time.

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A code card is used to select from controlled lists in filling out the site and monitoring cards. This part of the code card contains codes to describe topography where site elements are located and to record threats identified during monitoring.

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View of the MEGA-Jordan user interface, which system users access through a Web browser.

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DoA trainers discussing guidelines for collecting data for MEGA-Jordan during training at the GCI in April 2010.

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DoA trainers for the MEGA-Jordan program learning uses of Quantum GIS (QGIS) software, an open source application, as a complement to MEGA-Jordan during training at the GCI in April 2010.

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DoA trainers preparing for an exercise within training in the use of GPS devices for recording the location and extent of archaeological sites during training at the GCI in April 2010. Photo: Michael Aronowitz

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Participants in a three-week train-the-trainers activity held at the GCI in April 2010, including eight personnel of the DoA and trainers from the GCI and Farallon Geographics. Photo: Carol Hahn

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