Architectural Records, Inventories, and Information Systems for Conservation (ARIS) (2005–2009)
 
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Participants in ARIS07 recording conditions of the eighteenth-century wall paintings in Santa Cecilia in Rome. Photo: Rand Eppich

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Team members from Zanzibar, Greece, Germany, and Lithuania closely examining original techniques in raking light. To date, participants from more than fifty countries have taken an ARIS course. Photo: Rand Eppich

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An ARIS09 participant in the Cappella dei Ponziani mapping damage to wall paintings in order to understand the mechanisms of decay. Photo: Rand Eppich

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Many nondestructive techniques were explored in the ARIS courses. In this combination thermal/visual image, moisture entering from around the door frame (bottom) can be seen below the plaster (top). In the ARIS course, high-technology tools were used along with low-technology tools. Photo: Rand Eppich

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A participant from Cyprus testing the stereo vision on the computer. Stereo-photogrammetry was used to record the three-dimensional alters in the right nave of Santa Cecilia. Photo: Rand Eppich

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Instructor Werner Schmid explaining wall paintings conservation techniques at Santa Maria Antiqua in the Roman Forum. Site visits, such as this, were part of the courses. Photo: Rand Eppich

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Participants exploring some of the many documentation techniques available, including CAD (computer-aided design), laser scanning, GIS (geographic information systems) and Photoshop. Photo: Rand Eppich

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ARIS05 participants conduction extensive field measurements in the courtyard of Santa Cecilia using a Leica total station. Photo: Rand Eppich