Future Exhibitions and Installations

The Getty Center

  • Working Together: The Photographers of the Kamoinge Workshop

    July 19–October 9, 2022

    Working Together is the first major exhibition about the Kamoinge Workshop, a collective of Black photographers formed in New York in 1963. Members of the group produced powerful images, sensitively registering Black life in the mid-20th century. The exhibition explores Kamoinge’s photographic artistry in the 1960s and 1970s, celebrating the group’s collaborative ethos, commitment to community, and centering of Black experiences.

    Organized by the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

  • Cy Twombly: Making Past Present

    August 2–October 30, 2022

    American artist Cy Twombly’s engagement with the art and poetry of ancient Greece and Rome played a central role in his creative process. This exhibition explores Twombly’s lifelong fascination with the ancient Mediterranean world through evocative groupings of his paintings, drawings, prints, and sculpture made from the mid-20th to the early 21st century, tracing an imaginative journey of encounters with and responses to ancient texts and artifacts. The presentation includes sculpture from the artist’s personal collection, on public display for the first time.

    Organized with the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

  • Reinventing the Américas: Construct. Erase. Repeat.

    August 23, 2022–January 8, 2023

    This exhibition analyzes representations of the Americas, questioning the mythologies and utopian visions that proliferated after the arrival of Europeans to the continents. Featuring artistic interventions by Denilson Baniwa, an Indigenous contemporary artist from the Amazon region of Brazil, and the voices of local community groups in Los Angeles, Reinventing the Américas counters the views of European chroniclers, illustrators, and printmakers from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries by offering a multi-perspectival approach.

  • Eighteenth-Century Pastels

    August 30, 2022–February 26, 2023

    Pastels enjoyed a surge in popularity during the 18th century, when artists like Rosalba Carriera and Jean-Etienne Liotard carried the medium to new heights. Presenting works from the Getty collection by these pastellists and their contemporaries, this installation explores the physical properties of pastels and tells the story of their rising renown across Europe.

  • Dutch Drawings from a Collector’s Cabinet

    October 11, 2022–January 15, 2023

    An exhibition of Dutch drawings including figure studies by Rembrandt van Rijn and Ferdinand Bol, rare landscapes by Cornelis Vroom and Jacques de Gheyn II, and botanicals by Maria Sibylla Merian and Jacob Marrel. Featuring over 30 drawings that are new to the collection, many of these artworks have never been shown at the Getty Museum.

  • Visualizing the Virgin Mary

    October 11, 2022–January 8, 2023

    The Virgin Mary is one of the most important figures in the Christian tradition. This exhibition presents illuminated manuscripts depicting myriad stories and images from the Middle Ages that celebrated Mary as a personal intercessor, a compassionate mother, and a heavenly queen. The legacy of representing Mary is also shown through the venerated image of the Virgin of Guadalupe in the Americas, revealing how Mary provides different meanings for viewers across time.

  • Uta Barth: Peripheral Vision

    November 15, 2022–February 19, 2023

    Los Angeles–based photographer Uta Barth has spent her career exploring subtle changes of light as it illuminates various surfaces, documenting the passage of time and investigating the differences between how the human eye and the camera perceive the world. This selection of objects represents the most formative and critically acclaimed projects of Barth’s nearly 40-year career, including the debut of a new multi-part work commissioned by the Getty.

  • Porcelain from Versailles: Vases for a King and Queen

    February 14, 2023–March 3, 2024

    This exhibition brings together two of the most extraordinary surviving sets of vases owned by Louis XVI and Marie-Antoinette of France during the late 1700s. The vases are among the highest achievements of the Sèvres porcelain manufactory made before the French Revolution. They were personal treasures of the royal family and are a testament to the exemplary skills of the artists who took part in their creation.

The Getty Villa

  • Nubia: Jewels of Ancient Sudan
    From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

    October 12, 2022–April 3, 2023

    For nearly 3,000 years a series of kingdoms flourished in ancient Nubia (present-day southern Egypt and northern Sudan). The region was rich in sought-after resources such as gold and ivory and its trade networks reached Egypt, Greece, Rome, and central Africa. This exhibition presents highlights from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston's extensive collection of Nubian objects and features superbly crafted jewelry, metalwork, and sculpture exhibiting the wealth and splendor of Nubian society.