Future Exhibitions and Installations

The Getty Center

  • Cave Temples of Dunhuang: Buddhist Art on China's Silk Road
    敦煌莫高窟

    May 7–September 4, 2016

    The Mogao caves, located near the town of Dunhuang in the Gobi Desert of northwest China, comprise some 500 decorated Buddhist cave temples dating from the 4th to the 14th century. Filled with exquisite wall paintings and sculptures, the caves bear witness to the intense religious, artistic, and cultural exchanges along the Silk Road, the trade routes linking East and West. Cave Temples of Dunhuang: Buddhist Art on China's Silk Road features numerous objects originally from the site—such as paintings and manuscripts that have rarely, if ever, traveled to the United States, as well as three spectacular full-size cave replicas. The exhibition celebrates more than 25 years of collaboration between the Getty Conservation Institute and the Dunhuang Academy to preserve this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

  • Unruly Nature: The Landscapes of Théodore Rousseau

    June 21–September 11, 2016

    Though his reputation was eclipsed in the early twentieth century with the triumph of Impressionism, Théodore Rousseau (1812–1867) was one of the giants of French landscape in the second half of the nineteenth century, and his work was avidly collected for staggering sums across Europe and North America. Bringing together about seventy-five paintings and drawings, this international loan exhibition explores the astonishing technical and stylistic variety of his work, revealing him to be one of the most exciting, experimental, and affecting artists of his day.

  • Things Unseen: Vision, Belief, and Experience in Illuminated Manuscripts

    July 12–July 12, 2016

    Drawn primarily from the Getty Museum’s permanent collection of manuscripts, this exhibition explores the visual challenges artists faced as they sought to render miraculous encounters with the divine, grand visions of the end of time, the intricacies of belief, and the intimate communications of prayer. These “unseen” spiritual experiences, recorded by Jewish and Christian authors in antiquity, were translated in new ways by the illuminators of medieval and Renaissance books. Rather than simply narrating otherworldly events, the innovative images in this exhibition offer visual entry points to the ineffable nature of faith.

  • London Calling: Bacon, Freud, Kossoff, Andrews, Auerbach, and Kitaj

    July 26–November 13, 2016

    Between the 1940s and 1980s, when contemporary art was dominated by abstraction, conceptualism, and minimalism, a group of painters in London doggedly pursued the depiction of the human figure and everyday landscape, forging startling new approaches and styles. Drawn largely from the unrivaled holdings of the Tate in London, this is the first major exhibition in the U.S. to consider the work of six of the leaders of this “School of London” ─ Francis Bacon, Lucian Freud, Leon Kossoff, Michael Andrews, Frank Auerbach, and R. B. Kitaj ─ collectively, providing a timely reassessment of their extraordinary achievement.

  • Real/Ideal: Photography in France, 1847–1860

    August 30–August 30, 2016

    Between the first French publication on the paper negative in 1847 and more-streamlined mechanical advancements in the 1860s, dynamic debates were waged in France regarding photography’s prospects in the divergent fields of art and science. At the same time, novelists and painters were bringing everyday subjects—rather than idealized, academic themes—to the forefront of the artistic imagination, forging a new art for this era of social, economic, and political change. Organized around the Getty Museum’s holdings and supplemented with important international loans, this exhibition highlights the work of four photographers who were integral to the development of paper photography: Édouard Baldus, Gustave Le Gray, Henri Le Secq, and Charles Nègre.

  • Richard Learoyd: In the Studio

    August 30–August 30, 2016

    The contemplative mood and mesmerizing level of detail in the large-scale color photographs of Richard Learoyd present an uncanny intimacy between the depicted subject and the viewer. Working in his East London studio, the photographer utilizes a room-sized camera obscura with a fixed lens to make unique direct-positive prints. Eschewing digital technologies, his method emphasizes the creative potential of working under self-imposed restrictions. This is the first exhibition in an American museum to examine Learoyd’s studio-based practice.

The Getty Villa