Natalia Ariñez, 23 anos, estudiatned de arquitectura del las serie Los hijos. Tucuman, veinte anos despues/ Natalia Arinez, 23 Years Old, Architecture Student (detail), 1999, from the series The Sons and Daughters, Tucumán, Twenty Years Later, Julio Pantoja (Argentine, born 1961), gelatin silver print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Julio Pantoja Natalia Ariñez, 23 anos, estudiatned de arquitectura del las serie Los hijos. Tucuman, veinte anos despues/ Natalia Arinez, 23 Years Old, Architecture Student (detail), 1999, from the series The Sons and Daughters, Tucumán, Twenty Years Later, Julio Pantoja (Argentine, born 1961), gelatin silver print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council. © Julio Pantoja

From its independence in 1810 until the economic crisis of 2001, Argentina was perceived as a modern country with a powerful economic system, a strong middle class, a large European-immigrant population, and an almost nonexistent indigenous culture. This perception differs greatly from the way that other Latin American countries have been viewed, and underlines the difference between Argentina’s colonial and postcolonial process and those of its neighbors. Comprising three hundred works by sixty artists, this exhibition examines crucial periods and aesthetic movements in which photography had a critical role, producing—and, at times, dismantling—national constructions, utopian visions, and avant-garde artistic trends.

This exhibition is part of Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, a far reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles, taking place from September 2017 through January 2018 at more than 70 cultural institutions across Southern California. Pacific Standard Time is an initiative of the Getty. The presenting sponsor is Bank of America.

Explore all four Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA exhibitions at the Getty Center.

Selected Works

MOBILE

Learn how Argentine photographers chronicled and challenged Argentina’s development and national identity.

Pick up a multimedia player free of charge in the Museum Entrance Hall or use your own smartphone on our free GettyLink Wi-Fi.


Take the mobile audio tour: getty.edu/argentine

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