Library Catalog
 



Current Exhibitions


 
Blondell Cummings: Dance as Moving Pictures
September 18, 2021–February 19, 2022
On view at Art + Practice, Los Angeles


This collaboration by Art + Practice and the Getty Research Institute sheds new light on the pivotal work of African American choreographer and video artist Blondell Cummings. Featuring videos of rarely seen works from Cummings's personal archive, the exhibition—along with the book that accompanies it—is the first dedicated to the artist and the first produced by the Research Institute's African American Art History Initiative.

Blondell Cummings: Dance as Moving Pictures is generously supported by Maria Hummer-Tuttle and Robert Holmes Tuttle, with additional support from Gary and Kathi Cypres, and Michael Rubel and Kristin Rey.

Image: Blondell Cummings. Getty Research Institute, 2014.M.6. Photo: Beatriz Schiller. Courtesy the Estate of Blondell Cummings. Photo © Beatriz Schiller 2021


Upcoming Exhibitions


 
Flesh and Bones: The Art of Anatomy
February 22–July 10, 2022


Focused at the intersection of science and art, this exhibition explores themes of art and anatomy from the 16th century to today. From spectacular life-size illustrations to delicate paper flaps that lift to reveal the body's interior, the structure of the body is represented through a range of media. Artists not only helped create these images but were part of the market for them, as anatomy was a basic component of artistic training for centuries.

Image: Muscles of the neck (detail), 1811. Etching and engraving inked à la poupée in red and black ink. From Giuseppe Del Medico, Anatomia per uso dei pittori e scultori (Rome, 1811), pl. 16. Getty Research Institute, 84-B28069


 
Reinventing the Américas: Construct. Erase. Repeat.
August 23, 2022–January 8, 2023


This exhibition analyzes representations of the Americas, questioning the mythologies and utopian visions that proliferated after the arrival of Europeans to the continents. Featuring artistic interventions by Denilson Baniwa, an Indigenous contemporary artist from the Amazon region of Brazil, and the voices of local community groups in Los Angeles, Reinventing the Américas counters the views of European chroniclers, illustrators, and printmakers from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries by offering a multi-perspectival approach.

Image: Columnam a Prafecto prima navigationelocatam venerantur Floridenfes (Column in Honor of the First Voyage to Florida) (detail), Theodor de Bry. Engraving from Theodor de Bry, Brevis narratio eorum quaein Florida Americæ provincia Gallis acciderunt (Frankfurt, 1591), pl. 8. Getty Research Institute, 87-B24110


Upcoming Events


 
In-Person and Online Program
Getty Graduate Symposium 2022
February 5, 2022






 
 
In-Person Program
Under the Skin: Drawing Anatomy
March 12, 2022






Event Series


 
Imaginaries of LA
Since before its official founding in 1781, Los Angeles has existed on contested Tongva land. Although long recognized as a diverse and multicultural city, its history is marked by segregation, racist city planning, and harmful urban redevelopment policies. Imaginaries of LA is a series of conversations between Los Angeles-based artists and curators that explores what is at stake in the various strategies that artists use to represent Los Angeles and provides a forum for debate about the past, present and future of the city.

Imaginaries of LA: Umar Rashid and Sandy Rodriguez
November 10, 2021

Imaginaries of LA: Guadalupe Rosales and Pilar Tompkins
March 18, 2021

Imaginaries of LA: Edgar Arceneux and Edgar Arceneaux and Julian Myers-Szupinska
December 10, 2020

Image: Map of the Greater West (or, The Lemurian Triangle) (detail), Umar Rashid, 2017. Ink, acrylic, coffee, and tea on paper. 134.62 x 154.94 cm. Courtesy the artist


Online Exhibitions


 
Return to Palmyra
ONLINE ONLY

Presented in both Arabic and English, this project relaunches Getty Research Institute's first online exhibition, The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra, while newly focusing on the current plight of the inhabitants of this Syrian world heritage site, which suffered widespread destruction by ISIS in 2015 and 2017.

The exhibition showcases some of the site's earliest visual documents—18th-century illustrations by architect Louis-François Cassas and photographs by Louis Vignes from 1864—and now makes them available to an Arabic-speaking audience. An interview with Waleed Khaled al-As'ad, former Director of Antiquities and Museums at Palmyra, and an overview of the city from the prehistoric to modern period by art historian Joan Aruz, present a local context for the significance of this multicultural urban center and a case for why rebuilding its community is imperative.


 
Bauhaus: Building the New Artist
ONLINE ONLY

Considered one of the most influential schools of art and design of the 20th century, the Bauhaus forged a unique educational vision that blended theory with practice in order to cultivate a new generation of artists and designers.

Conceived in tandem with the Getty Research Institute's gallery exhibition, the online exhibition Bauhaus: Building the New Artist offers an in-depth look into the school's novel pedagogy. Highlighting student explorations, masters' theories, and a variety of colorful media drawn from the GRI's archives, the project culminates with three interactive exercises inviting viewers to immerse themselves in surprising aspects of Bauhaus curriculum.