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THE GETTY'S FREE LECTURE SERIES ON CONSERVATION ISSUES SPOTLIGHTS INDIA'S NAGAUR FORT, ETHICAL DILEMMAS IN ART CONSERVATION, AND THE MONA LISA VIEWED AT THE NANOSCALE

Conservation Matters Lectures at the Getty Center Begin March 19 through May 2009

February 26, 2009

LOS ANGELES—The Getty Conservation Institute’s free public lecture series, Conservation Matters, continues in 2009 with three lectures beginning March 19 and continuing through May 19, 2009.  This signature series of the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) features an expert lineup of international speakers who bring attention to some of the most pressing issues facing the conservation of art and historic sites today, and offer insight into key preservation efforts around the world. The broad range of topics are geared to conservation professionals and the general public alike.

The first lecture examines Ahichhatragarh—or "Fort of the Hooded Cobra,” located in Nagaur City in northwest India.  Join architect Minakshi Jain on March 19, 2009, at 7 p.m., in the Getty Center Museum Lecture Hall as she explains how the previously dilapidated Nagaur Fort became a model for the conservation of historic sites, supported in part by a series of Getty Foundation grants.  Begun in the 12th century on the remains of a fourth-century mud outpost and standing at the crossroads of developing trade routes, the fort was expanded by successive rulers until the mid-18th century. Today, after a dramatic transformation, it is a 35-acre complex with four main palaces and over 50 smaller buildings, surrounded by two fortification walls and—despite the arid climate—by extensive gardens, fountains, pools, and water systems. 

On April 29, at 7 p.m., in the Harold M. Williams Auditorium at the Getty Center, KCRW-FM Radio’s Edward Goldman, host of Art Talk, will moderate a dynamic panel of experts, including conservators, collection managers and curators as they discuss the many ethical considerations they must face when dealing with the ephemeral and transitory nature of modern and contemporary art. The panelists will explore real-life case studies using examples from the Tate Museum, SFMOMA, and the Hirshhorn.

Lastly, on May 19, 2009, at 7 p.m., in the Getty Center Museum Lecture Hall, Leonardo's Mona Lisa – arguably one of the most famous paintings in the world – is examined down to the nanometer scale.  Join Michel Menu, head of the research department at the Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, as he takes us on a journey of exploration below the surface of this extraordinary painting.  

Admission to panel discussions is free, but seating is limited. To make reservations, call 310-440-7300 or visit www.getty.edu.  Press seating is available

Conservation Matters is the Getty Conservation Institute’s public lecture series and is intended to bring to light some of the key challenges and solutions facing professionals charged with protecting our cultural heritage today. The series helps to raise awareness and understanding of the importance of preserving artworks and historic sites, safeguarding the rich variety of cultural and artistic heritage found around the world. For more information on the series and to watch video documentation of previous events, please visit: www.getty.edu and choose Getty Conservation Institute, Public Programs.

 

2009 Schedule: Conservation Matters Lectures at the Getty

Unless otherwise noted, all lectures take place in the Harold M. Williams Auditorium at the Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles. Lectures are free; reservations are strongly recommended. To make reservations, call 310-440-7300 or visit www.getty.edu.

March 19, 2009, 7 p.m., Museum Lecture Hall
Conservation of the Ahichhatragarh-Nagaur Fort in India
Join architect Minakshi Jain as she explains how the previously dilapidated Ahichhatragarh-Nagaur Fort in India became a model for the conservation of historic sites, supported in part by a series of Getty Foundation grants. The project was also a recipient of UNESCO's Award for Excellence in Cultural Heritage Conservation and was recognized for setting new conservation standards by combining modern scientific techniques with traditional building methods. Jain is an architect and the director for the conservation of the Ahichhatragarh-Nagaur Fort.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009, 7 p.m., Harold M. Williams Auditorium
Ethical Dilemmas in the Conservation of Modern and Contemporary Art

The difficult decisions being made by conservators for modern and contemporary art are highly complex, ethical dilemmas, and in many cases there are clear disagreements on how to resolve conflicting values. Join a panel of experts, including conservators, collection managers and curators, as they discuss the ethical considerations they are faced with when dealing with the ephemeral and transitory nature of many artworks from this period.

May 19, 2009, 7 p.m., Harold M. Williams Auditorium
Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa Uncovered

Leonardo's Mona Lisa is arguably one of the most famous paintings in the world—if not the most famous. The abundance of speculation about her enigmatic smile, her identity, and the meaning of the painting has only increased her fame; but what does the Mona Lisa really look like down to the nanometer scale? Join Michel Menu, head of the research department at the Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France, as he takes us on a journey of exploration below the surface of this extraordinary painting.   Michel Menu is head of the research department (laboratory) at the Centre de recherche et de restauration des musées de France (Center for Research and Restoration of the French Museums) and a principal organizer of the project to examine the Mona Lisa.

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MEDIA CONTACT:  

Melissa Abraham
Getty Communications Department
310-440-6861
mabraham@getty.edu

About the Getty:

The J. Paul Getty Trust is an international cultural and philanthropic institution devoted to the visual arts that features the Getty Conservation Institute, the Getty Foundation, the J. Paul Getty Museum, and the Getty Research Institute. The J. Paul Getty Trust and Getty programs serve a varied audience from two locations: the Getty Center in Los Angeles and the Getty Villa in Malibu.

Sign up for e-Getty at www.getty.edu/subscribe/ to receive free monthly highlights of events at the Getty Center and the Getty Villa via e-mail, or visit our event calendar for a complete calendar of public programs.

The Getty Conservation Institute works internationally to advance conservation practice in the visual arts-broadly interpreted to include objects, collections, architecture, and sites. The Institute serves the conservation community through scientific research, education and training, model field projects, and the dissemination of the results of both its own work and the work of others in the field. In all its endeavors, the GCI focuses on the creation and delivery of knowledge that will benefit the professionals and organizations responsible for the conservation of the world's cultural heritage. To learn more, subscribe to the GCI's E-Bulletin by visiting http://www.getty.edu/subscribe/gci_bulletin/.

Visiting the Getty Center: The Getty Center is open Tuesday through Friday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. It is closed Monday and major holidays. Admission to the Getty Center is always free. Parking is $15 per car, but free after 5pm on Saturdays and for evening events throughout the week. No reservation is required for parking or general admission. Reservations are required for event seating and groups of 15 or more. Please call 310-440-7300 (English or Spanish) for reservations and information. The TTY line for callers who are deaf or hearing impaired is 310-440-7305. The Getty Center is at 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles, California.