A participant practices Renaissance painting techniques at a past course
Enjoy instruction in a variety of media related to the Museum's collection and current exhibitions. Designed for all levels of expertise (unless otherwise specified), courses and culinary programs are taught by artists, educators, and related professionals. Registration is required for all courses.

Culinary Programs
The Getty Center and The Getty Villa


Chefs, food historians, wine connoisseurs and other experts provide a unique entrée to the Museum's permanent collections and special exhibitions through an exciting array of culinary themed talks and tastings.

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The Taste of Temptation: Aphrodisiacs in the Renaissance
Sunday, January 27, 2019
5:30–8:30 p.m.
Getty Center, Museum Lecture Hall and Getty Restaurant
Tickets $55 or $65 with hypocras/mead pairing (21 and over for pairing option)
Complimentary parking

Chefs in the Renaissance era were fascinated by ingredients that could arouse the libido, heighten pleasure and lead eventually to conception. In this talk food historian and author Ken Albala will unravel the logic of Renaissance aphrodisiacs, delving into herbal lore, nutritional theory, and folk medicine. (He will also explore why not being turned-on by food was an equally important topic!). Following the talk, indulge in food and drink inspired by historical recipes (and filled with amorous ingredients) at the Getty Restaurant. Complements The Renaissance Nude exhibition.

About Ken Albala
Ken Albala is Professor of History at the University of the Pacific and has authored or edited 25 books on food including Eating Right in the Renaissance, Food in Early Modern Europe, Cooking in Europe 1250-1650, The Banquet, Beans (winner 2008 IACP Jane Grigson Award), Pancake, Grow Food, Cook Food, Share Food, Nuts: A Global History and, most recently, Noodle Soup: Recipes, Techniques, Obsession. Albala is currently working on a history of aphrodisiacs and a book about walking with wine.

He has served as editor for A Cultural History of Food: The Renaissance, the 4-volume Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia, and was series editor of Rowman and Littlefield Studies in Food and Gastronomy for which wrote Three World Cuisines (winner of the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards best foreign cuisine book in the world for 2012).

He has also co-authored two cookbooks: The Lost Art of Real Cooking and The Lost Arts of Hearth and Home. His course Food: A Cultural Culinary History is available on DVD from the Great Courses and for free as a podcast.

 
Drinking in the Past: Rediscovering and Recreating Ancient Egyptian Brews Talk and Tasting
Friday, August 3 and
Saturday, August 4, 2018
6:00–9:00 p.m.
Getty Center, Museum Lecture Hall and Garden Terrace
Tickets $65 (includes appetizers, ages 21 and over)
Complimentary parking

Join Patrick McGovern, the "Indiana Jones of Ancient Ales, Wines, and Extreme Beverages," as he decodes long-forgotten drink recipes of ancient Egypt. Taking his clues from archaeology, texts, tomb art, ethnography, and chemical analysis of residues inside pottery jars, McGovern unravels what ancient Egyptians were imbibing. Beyond their mind-altering effects, these beverages were to become the medicines, religious symbols, and social lubricants of ancient Egyptian culture for thousands of years. His talk, paired with a special beer tasting, complements the exhibition Beyond the Nile: Egypt and the Classical World.

 
About Patrick McGovern
Patrick E. McGovern is the scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Laboratory for Cuisine, Fermented Beverages, and Health at the University of Pennsylvania Museum in Philadelphia, where he is also an adjunct professor of anthropology. Over the past two decades, he has pioneered the exciting interdisciplinary field of biomolecular archaeology, which is yielding whole new chapters concerning our human ancestry, medical practice, and ancient cuisines and beverages. He is the author of Ancient Wine: The Search for the Origins of Viniculture (Princeton University Press, 2003), Uncorking the Past: The Quest for Wine, Beer, and Other Alcoholic Beverages (Berkeley: University of California, 2009) and Ancient Brews: Rediscovered and Re-created (New York: W. W. Norton Company, Inc., 2017), and he appeared regularly on the Discovery Channel's Brew Masters program.

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Drawing From the Masters
The Getty Center


Enjoy the tradition of sketching from original works of art every first and third Sundays of the month at the Getty Center. Guest artists provide general guidance. All experience levels welcome. Participants are encouraged to bring sketchpads. Sign-up begins at 2:30 p.m. at the Information Desk. This is a free program.

 
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Mannerism and Exaggeration
Elongated forms and dramatic compositions characterized the Mannerist style of the late Renaissance. Explore the emotive potential of exaggeration through guided drawing lessons combined with recent discoveries from the emerging field of neuroaesthetics with artist Peter Zokosky.

Sunday, March 3 and 17, 2019
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Museum Galleries

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Positive and Negative Space
Explore how artists compose pictures, design forms, and communicate emotions through the use of positive and negative space with artist Kaitlynn Redell.

Sunday, February 3 and 17, 2019
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Museum Galleries

Mark Making
Explore the expressive potential of making marks to create value, form, and texture with artist Marissa Magdelena.

Sunday, January 6 and 20, 2019
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Museum Galleries

Artistic Anatomy
Learn to draw the human figure while exploring key elements of human anatomy and proportion with artist Peter Zokosky.

Sunday, December 2 and 16, 2018
3:30–5:30 p.m.
Museum Galleries

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Courses
The Getty Center and The Getty Villa


Hands-on activities guided by practicing artists focus on contemporary and historic materials and techniques related to art on view at the Getty Center and the Getty Villa. Programs range from introductory to master classes offered in both single and multi-session format.

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Powerful Protectors: Magic in the Roman World
Saturdays, February 2, February 9, March 2, and April 13, 2019
11:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.
Getty Villa, Education Courtyard
Free; no reservation required

Through magical chants and special objects, ancient Romans harnessed the forces of nature and asked supernatural beings to bring good fortune and protection. In this interactive family workshop, customize a personal power pouch and join actress Beth Kennedy for theatrical play to activate the magic!

 
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Sculpting and Shaping Clay
Saturday, January 12, 2019
11:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.
Getty Villa, Education Courtyard
Free; no reservation required

Join the fun in this hands-on clay lab and discover how artists have transformed earth and water into beautiful ceramics for thousands of years. Try your hand at the potter's wheel, mold a Medusa, and shape a handle to decorate a communal vessel. LA-based ceramic artist Wayne Perry guides the experience and shares what his artistic practice has in common with the ancient Greeks'. This program complements the exhibition Underworld: Imagining the Afterlife.

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Drawing from Antiquity
The Getty Villa


Artists have long looked to classical antiquity for inspiration. Drawing from ancient works of art and architecture was a regular part of studio practice since the 15th century. Sketchbooks in hand, some artists even traveled to Italy and Greece to explore the surviving monuments of classical culture in situ.

Discover this historical tradition at the Getty Villa in this free, 1.5 hour program. Artist and educator Elmira Adamian guides an informal lesson as you sketch from works of art, architecture, and the gardens of the Villa. Experiment with various historical drawing materials in the gallery and studio.

Supplies are provided and all skill levels are welcome. This is a free program. Sign-up begins 15 minutes before the start of the program at the Tour Meeting Place. Open to 25 participants.

Drawing in the Outer Peristyle garden
 
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The Cycle of Death and Rebirth: Seasons in Ancient Greece
In ancient Greece, the cycle of death and rebirth was linked with the agricultural seasons and the regeneration of vegetation. Artworks in the Museum's collection depict personifications of the Four Seasons and important deities related to cyclical change. In this workshop, practice drawing gods and goddesses associated with death and rebirth.

Saturday, March 23, 2019
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Villa Galleries

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Dynamic Line: Statue of a Crouching Venus
A favorite artwork of J. Paul Getty's, the larger-than-life Crouching Venus kneels in a dramatic pose popular in ancient times. The bathing goddess turns her head toward her little son Cupid as she reaches her arm in the other direction. Her balanced, twisting body provides an excellent model for drawing movement with expressive, dynamic lines.

Saturday, February 16, 2019
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Villa Galleries

Greek and Roman Armor
Greek and Roman warriors wore intricate, expertly made armor, found in surviving ancient examples and in realistic images in ancient art. Explore painted vases, carved marble, and the bronze armor of humans and horses. Learn about different types of helmets, shields, and breastplates, then draw from a piece that inspires you.

Saturday, January 26, 2019
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Villa Galleries

Detail and Definition
Learn ways of tackling detail in your drawings inspired by the smallest objects in the museum's collection: gems. Carving gems was a special skill in antiquity. Many rings and other jewelry have intricate designs carved onto tiny gem surfaces. In this workshop, look at magnified images and learn about their significance, then design your own detailed drawings.

Saturday, December 15, 2018
11:00 a.m.–12:30 p.m.
Villa Galleries

See all upcoming courses and demonstrations on our event calendar.

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