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ID: 7006467
Page Link: http://vocab.getty.edu/page/tgn/7006467

 

Record Type: administrative
Hierarchy of Moravia (general region)  Moravia (general region)

Note: Moravia is a region in the Czech Republic, bounded by Silesia on the northeast, Bohemia on the west and northwest, Austria to the south, and Slovakia on the east. It was home to Celtic Bori and Cotini peoples from the fourth century BCE. Germanic tribes arrived in the period from the first to the fifth century CE, then the Avars in the sixth and seventh centuries, then a Slavic people called the Moravians, after the Morava River, in the late eighth century. It became an independent kingdom in the ninth century, Great Moravia, which comprised all of Bohemia, the southern part of modern Poland, and the western part of modern Hungary. Great Moravia dissolved with the death of its king Svatopluk in 894 and an overwhelming attack by the Magyars. Its lands were variously taken over by Hungary, Poland, and Bohemia. To Bohemia went Moravia proper, which was incorporated as a province in 1029. It came under the rule of the Austria Hapsburgs in 1526 together with Bohemia and Silesia. In the centuries of religious strife and rebellion that followed, Moravia was less rebellious than Bohemia and its largely Protestant population suffered less. Late in the 18th century what remained of Austrian Silesia was merged into Moravia and after 1848 it became an Austrian crown land with some autonomy. In 1918 it was joined to the new nation of Czechoslovakia. In 1949 it ceased to be a single administrative unit, being divided into several smaller provinces by the Czechoslovakian government. In 1960, the territory formerly known as Moravia and Silesia became Jihomoravsky, or South Moravia, and Severomoravsky, or North Moravia. These became part of the Czech Republic in 1993.

Names:
Morava (preferred,C,V,Czech-P,U,N)
Mähren (C,V,German-P,U,N)
Moravia (C,O,English-P,U,N)

Hierarchical Position:
Hierarchy of World (facet)    World (facet)
Hierarchy of Europe (continent)  ....  Europe (continent) (P)
Hierarchy of Czech Republic (nation)  ........  Czech Republic (nation) (P)
Hierarchy of Moravia (general region)  ............  Moravia (general region) (P)

Place Types:
general region (preferred, C)

Sources and Contributors:
Mähren..........  [BHA, VP]
.................  Rand McNally Atlas (1994) I-104
Morava..........  [BHA, VP Preferred]
.................  Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer (1961)
.................  Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984)
Moravia..........  [BHA, VP]
.................  Canby, Historic Places (1984) II, 621
.................  Times Atlas of the World (1994) 5
Subject: .....  [BHA, VP]
..................  Canby, Historic Places (1984) II, 621
..................  Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer (1961)
..................  Rand McNally Atlas (1994) I-104
..................  Times Atlas of the World (1994) 5
..................  Webster's Geographical Dictionary (1984)
 
Note:
English .......... [VP]
..........  Encyclopedia Britannica Online (2002-2014) accessed 4 Dec. 2003

 

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