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Purpose

The Getty Thesaurus of Geographic Names ® (TGN), the Art & Architecture Thesaurus ® (AAT), the Union List of Artist Names ® (ULAN), and the Cultural Objects Name Authority ® (CONA) (in development) are structured vocabularies that can be used to improve access to information about art, architecture, and material culture.

  • Cataloging: They may be used as data value standards at the point of documentation or cataloging. In this context, they may be used as a controlled vocabulary or authority by the cataloger or indexer; they provide preferred names/terms and synonyms for people, places, and things. They also provide structure and classification schemes that can aid in documentation.

  • Retrieval: They may be used as search assistants in database retrieval systems. They are knowledge bases that include semantic networks that show links and paths between places; these relationships can make retrieval more successful.

  • Research tools: They may be utilized as research tools, valuable because of the rich information and contextual knowledge that they contain.

Target audience: The four Getty vocabularies are intended to provide terminology and other information about the objects, artists, concepts, and places important to various disciplines that specialize in art, architecture and material culture. The TGN includes names and associated information about places. Places in TGN include administrative political entities (e.g., cities, nations) and physical features (e.g., mountains, rivers). Current and historical places are included.

The primary users of the Getty vocabularies include museums, art libraries, archives, visual resource collection catalogers, bibliographic projects concerned with art, researchers in art and art history, and the information specialists who are dealing with the needs of these users. In addition, a significant number of users of the Getty vocabularies are students or members of the general public.

Accessing the vocabularies: Catalogers and indexers who use the vocabularies typically access them in two ways: By using them as implemented in a collection management system (either purchased off-the-shelf through a vendor or custom-built for their local requirements), or by using the online databases on the Getty Web site. The databases made available on the Web site are intended to support limited research and cataloging efforts. Companies and institutions interested in regular or extensive use of the Getty vocabularies should explore licensing options by contacting the Getty Vocabulary Program at vocab@getty.edu. Implementers who wish to provide vocabularies to end-users or use them in search engines may license the vocabularies in XML or relational tables, which are released annually. The data is also available via Web services, where it is updated every two weeks. The licensed files include no user interface. TGN will be released as LOD later in 2014.

Comprehensiveness and updates: The TGN is a compiled resource; it is not comprehensive. A minimum TGN records contains a numeric ID, a name, a place in the hierarchy, and a place type. The TGN grows through contributions. Current areas of TGN development include 1) updating the modern hierarchy of administrative divisions, 2) adding archaeological sites, World Heritage Site names, and other historical sites, focusing on Asian, Pre-Columbian, Middle Eastern, and others, 3) building historical hierarchies for historical nations and empires.


History of the TGN

Work on the TGN began in 1987, when the Getty created a department dedicated to compiling and distributing terminology, at that time called the Vocabulary Coordination Group. The AAT was already being managed by the Getty at that time, and the Getty attempted to respond to requests from the creators of art information for additional controlled vocabularies for artists' names (ULAN) and geographic names (TGN). The development of TGN was informed by an international study completed by the Thesaurus Artis Universalis (TAU), a working group of the Comité International d'Histoire de l'Art (CIHA), and by the consensus reached at a colloquium held in 1991, attended by the spectrum of potential users of geographic vocabulary in cataloging and scholarship of art and architectural history and archaeology. The initial core of the TGN was compiled from thousands of geographic names in use by various Getty cataloging and indexing projects, enlarged by information from U. S. government databases, and further enhanced by the manual entry of information from published hard-copy sources. The TGN grows and changes via contributions from the user community and editorial work of the Getty Vocabulary Program.

The basic principles under which the TGN is constructed and maintained were established by the AAT and also employed for the ULAN: Its scope includes terminology needed to catalog and retrieve information about the visual arts and architecture; it is constructed using national and international standards for thesaurus construction; it comprises a hierarchy with tree structures corresponding to the current and historical worlds; it is based on terminology that is current, warranted for use by authoritative literary sources, and validated by use in the scholarly art and architectural history community; and it is compiled and edited in response to the needs of the user community.

TGN was founded under the management of Eleanor Fink (head of what was then called the Vocabulary Coordination Group, and subsequently Director of the Art History Information Program, later called the Getty Information Institute). TGN has been constructed over the years by numerous members of the user community and an army of dedicated editors, under the supervision of several managers. Technical support for the TGN was provided by the Getty. TGN was first published in 1997 in machine-readable files. Given the growing size and frequency of changes and additions to the TGN, hard-copy publication was deemed to be impractical. It is currently published in both a searchable online Web interface and in data files available for licensing. The data for the TGN is compiled and edited in an editorial system that was custom-built by Getty technical staff to meet the unique requirements of compiling data from many contributors, building complex and changing polyhierarchies, merging, moving, and publishing in various formats. Final editorial control of the TGN is maintained by the Getty Vocabulary Program, using well-established editorial rules.

The current manager of the Getty vocabularies is Patricia Harpring, Managing Editor. Administratively, the Vocabulary Program resides under the GRI Collection Management and Description Division (David Farneth, Head). Other GRI departments in this division are General Collection Cataloging, Special Collections Cataloging, Digital Services, the Registrar’s Office, Institutional Records and Archives, and Conservation and Preservation. The Vocabulary Program works with Art History Documentation (Murtha Baca, Head) to foster foreign language translations of the vocabularies, maintain national and international partnerships, and oversee licensing and marketing.


Scope and Structure

TGN is a structured vocabulary currently containing around 2,035,195 names and other information about places. Names for a place may include names in the vernacular language, English, other languages, historical names, names and in natural order and inverted order. Among these names, one is flagged as the preferred name.

TGN is a thesaurus, compliant with ISO and NISO standards for thesaurus construction; it contains hierarchical, equivalence, and associative relationships. Note that TGN is not a GIS (Geographic Information System). While many records in TGN include coordinates, these coordinates are approximate and are intended for reference only.

The focus of each TGN record is a place. There are around 1,431,380 places in the TGN. In the database, each place record (also called a subject) is identified by a unique numeric ID. Linked to the record for the place are names, the place's parent or position in the hierarchy, other relationships, geographic coordinates, notes, sources for the data, and place types, which are terms describing the role of the place (e.g., inhabited place and state capital). The temporal coverage of the TGN ranges from prehistory to the present and the scope is global.

More about scope and structure: The TGN is a hierarchical database; its trees branch from a root called Top of the TGN hierarchies (Subject_ID: 1000000). Currently there are two TGN facets, World and Extraterrestrial Places. Under the facet World, places are arranged in hierarchies generally representing the current political and physical world, although some historical nations and empires are also included. There may be multiple broader contexts, making the TGN polyhierarchical.


Information in the Record (Fields)

  • Language: Most fields in TGN records are written in English. However, the structure of the TGN supports multilinguality; names and scope notes may be written and flagged in multiple languages. The overall record-preferred name is written in the Roman alphabet. All data is in Unicode.

  • Diacritics: The TGN names and other fields contain dozens of different diacritics, expressed as codes (e.g., $00) in the data files. The TGN diacritical codes are mapped to Unicode. The mapping is distributed with the licensed data files. These codes should be translated into the proper diacritical mark for end-users. A Unicode version of the data is now also available. In Web displays, it may be impossible to display all diacritics. If a box or illegible sign displays instead of a character in a name or term, this means that your system cannot display the Unicode character represented. You may view the full name or term with correct diacritics by using Vista, Mac OS 10.5, or often by pasting the word into an MS Word document.

  • Fields: The TGN fields (i.e., discrete pieces of data) are described below. Data dictionaries for the licensed files are available at http://www.getty.edu/research/tools/vocabularies/obtain/download.html.

  • Subject ID
    Unique numeric identification for the TGN record. Each place in the TGN database is uniquely identified by a numeric ID that serves to link the names and all other pertinent information to the place record. The ID is generally permanent. Occasionally an ID may change due to the record being merged with another record; in such cases, the new IDs are included in the licensed files, and a mapping between defunct and new IDs is provided to licensees.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Record Type
    Type designation that characterizes the TGN record. Record types include the following:
     

    Administrative: Refers to places defined by administrative boundaries and conditions, including inhabited places, nations, and empires.

    Physical: Refers to physical features, defined by their physical characteristics on planet Earth, including mountains, rivers, and oceans.

    Both: Used for places that are both administrative and physical.

    Hierarchy Name, Guide Term, and Facet: Currently these record types are hidden from end-users.

    Example
    Example

     
  • Label
    Brief text identification of the place, concatenated from the preferred Name, parent string, and preferred Place Type. Whereas the Subject ID identifies the place in the database, the Label serves as an easily legible heading to identify the place for end-users. In the TGN Online display (an entry in a results list display is illustrated below), the Label is displayed with the hierarchy icon (to the left of the Label) in order to permit the end-user to go to the hierarchy to browse for places.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    Note that the above Label illustrates the parent string in descending order, which is useful to allow sorting among homographs in results lists. For other displays, it will be more user-friendly to display the parents in ascending order.

  • Note
    Called the Descriptive Note, a note that describes the history, physical location of the place, or the importance of the place relative to art and architecture. Many, but not all, TGN records include a note The example below is for the Roman Empire.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Coordinates
    Geographic coordinates indicating the position of the place, expressed in degrees/minutes and decimal fractions of degrees. Latitude (Lat.) is the angular distance north or south of the equator, measured along a meridian. Longitude (Long.) is the angular distance east or west of the Prime Meridian at Greenwich, England. Bounding coordinates and elevation may also be included (as in the example for Great Lakes Region below).
     

    Example
    Example

     
    NOTE: TGN is not a GIS: it is a thesaurus. While many records in TGN include coordinates, these coordinates are approximate and are intended for reference ("finding purposes") only.

    Geographic coordinates in TGN typically represent a single point, corresponding to a point in or near the center of the inhabited place, political entity, or physical feature. For linear features such as rivers, the point represents the source of the feature.

    Coordinates are expressed in degrees and minutes (as are used in atlases); they are also expressed in decimal fractions of degrees. In decimal fractions, west longitude and south latitude are expressed as negative numbers (as in the example for Rio de Janeiro below).
  • The primary sources of coordinates in TGN are either of the two large U.S. government databases, USGS (United States Geological Survey (USGS) and NGA (formerly NIMA; National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA).

    So far as is possible given that TGN is compiled from various contributors, coordinates in TGN are compliant with following standards: ISO 6709 Standard representation of geographic point location by coordinates, using the WGS 84 (revised 2004) coordinate reference system.

     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Names
    Names and appellations referring to the place, including a preferred name and variant names. All names in a record (i.e., all names linked by a single Subject ID) are considered equivalents (i.e., synonyms). A TGN record may contain the vernacular and English names of the place, variant names in other languages, and historical names. One name is flagged as the preferred name, which is the indexing form of the name most often found in scholarly or authoritative publications. In the example below, all names refer to the same place, Munich, Germany.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Term ID: Numeric ID that identifies the name in the database (e.g., in the example above, Munich has the following Term_ID: 140499). Term IDs are unique; homographs have different IDs. The Term_ID may be hidden from end-users.

  • Display order of the names
    Names are arranged in a particular order by the editors. The preferred name is positioned first in a list of names for the place, with the preferred English (if any) and other commonly-used current names at the top of the list. Historical names appear at the bottom of the list, sorted in reverse chronological order, if applicable (see the example of Alexandria, Egypt below).

    Implementers should sort the names by the Display_order number, which is included in the data files, but typically hidden from end-users.

  • Flags for the Names
    In the TGN data, there are various flags associated with each name. In displays for the end-user, some of the flags may be suppressed. For example, in the display below, the Vernacular flag is displayed as a capital letter "V" in parentheses following the name; the capital letter should be linked to an explanation of what the flag means.
     

    Preferred Name
    The flag preferred following a name indicates that the name is the so-called preferred name for the record. (The flag non-preferred is hidden in the display.)

    Each record has one and only one default preferred name, flagged in order to provide a default name for the hierarchical and other displays (see also Language of the Names below). The preferred name is the name most commonly used in the vernacular (local) language (as in the example below, transliterated from Arabic).

    Example
    Example

    The preferred name for physical features is the inverted form of the name, when applicable. This is the name that would be preferred in alphabetical lists.

    Example
    Example

    Display Name
    There may be a name flagged Display, meaning that this name should be used in horizontal displays (such as a label or results list) where confusion may result from using the preferred name. For example, when the name of a city is the same as the name of a county, the name of the county should include the word county for clarity in a horizontal display. In the example below, Los Angeles county is a display name, meaning that this name should be used in a horizontal display when it is a parent with the name of the city, as in the following: Los Angeles (Los Angeles county, California, United States). If the name is flagged Index, this is the name that should be used in alphabetical lists. The Preferred Name is the default Index Name and generally not flagged Index.

    Y = Yes (i.e., this is the Display Name)
    I = Index
    N = No
    NA = Not Applicable

    Example
    Example

    Other Flags
    Indicates various characteristics of the Name.

    O = Official name
    P = Pseudonym
    PN = Provisional name
    S = Site name
    A = Abbreviation
    ISO3L = ISO 3-letter code (International Organization for Standardization)
    ISO2L = ISO 2-letter code (International Organization for Standardization)
    ISO3N = ISO 3-number code (International Organization for Standardization)
    ISO2N = ISO 2-number code (International Organization for Standardization)
    USPS = US Postal Service code
    FIPS = FIPS code (Federal Information Processing Standards)
    NA = Not Applicable

    Example
    Example

    LC flag
    Also called the AACR Flag. Currently this flag is usually set to NA in TGN. Where it is used, it flags names that correspond to Library of Congress Subject Headings.

    NA = Not Applicable
    Y = Yes

    Name Type flag
    Indicates the type of name or term.

    N = Noun form
    A = Adjectival form
    B = Both noun and adjectival

    Historical flag
    Indicates if the name is current or historical.

    C = Current
    H = Historical
    B = Both current and historical
    U = Unknown
    NA = Not Applicable

    Vernacular flag
    Indicates if the name is in the vernacular (local) language, or some other language. There may be multiple vernacular names. See also Language of the Names below.

    V = Vernacular
    O = Other
    U = Undetermined

     
  • Part of Speech
    In TGN, primarily used to flag adjectival name forms (e.g., Italian for Italy); the name field in TGN usually contains proper nouns.

    U = Undetermined
    N = Noun
    A = Adjectival
    B = Both


  • Dates for the Names
    Dates comprise a Display Date, which is a note referring to a date or other information about the name, and Start Date and End Date, which are years that delimit the span of time referred to in the Display Date. Start and End Dates index the Display Date for retrieval, but are hidden from end-users. The dates refer to usage of the name, not necessarily tied to the dates of existence the place.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    Start and End Dates are years in the proleptic Gregorian calendar, which is the calendar produced by extending the Gregorian calendar to dates preceding its official introduction. Dates BCE are expressed as negative numbers. If the name is currently used in literature to refer to the place, the End Date is 9999.

  • Language of the Names
    If the vernacular language for a place is not English and there is an English name for the place, the English name will be included and flagged (as noted below). In addition, some TGN records currently include names with other language designations. A single name may have multiple language designations because it may have the same spelling in multiple languages.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    Languages are derived from a controlled list, which includes the name of the language and a numeric code (e.g., French / 70271). The code is hidden from end-users.

  • Preferred flag for a given language
    A "P" following the language in the examples indicates that this is the preferred name in that language. In the TGN, the preferred name (descriptor) is by default the preferred name in the vernacular language. If there is an English equivalent, it will be flagged. For example, the preferred English spelling is marked with a "P" (English -P) in the example above. For a given language, there is only one preferred name, although there may be multiple non-preferred names in that language.

  • Language status
    Flag indicating loan words. Values are Undetermined, NA, Loan Term. Given that most names in TGN are not translated into other langauges, this flag is generally set to NA in TGN.

  • Qualifier
    Currently, qualifiers are rarely used in the TGN. A qualifier is a word or phrase used to distinguish between homographs or other confusing names. In the TGN data files, the Qualifier is stored in a separate field, associated with the Language designation for the name.

  • Hierarchical Positions / Parent ID
    The hierarchy in the TGN refers to the method of structuring and displaying the places within their broader contexts. Place records in the TGN typically have a whole/part relationship (rather than genus/species relationship). Hierarchies are built by using the Parent_ID, which is linked to each Subject_ID; the Parent_ID is hidden from end-users.

    For end-users, the Hierarchical Position is typically indicated in a display that shows broader contexts or parents of the concept. In a vertical Hierarchy Display, whole/part relationships are indicated with indention, as in the example below. (See also Place Types below for further discussion of the main political and administrative divisions of the hierarchy.)
     

    Example
    Example

     
    In horizontal displays, the parents should be included in either ascending or descending order. Displaying parents in descending order is helpful to allow sorting among homographs in a results list (as illustrated below), while displaying parents in ascending order is more user-friendly in other displays.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Multiple parents
    The TGN is polyhierarchical. Each Subject_ID may be linked to multiple Parent_IDs. If there are multiple parents, one is marked as preferred. In displays, the preferred parent is listed first or otherwise designated. The example below illustrates the display of parents in a Full Record Display for Bermuda.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    Unusual or complicated relationships of inhabited places to their parents are represented in the TGN hierarchy through the polyhierarchy. When a place has different political and physical parents, the polyhierarchy is employed (as in the example above). If the area of an inhabited place crosses administrative boundaries (e.g. as happens in the USA when a city belongs to two counties), the inhabited place appears under both administrative subdivisions. Likewise, if jurisdiction over an area is disputed between two nations, that area would appear as part of both nations. In the full hierarchical view, it is recommended that implementers indicate relationships to non-preferred parents with an "[N]", as illustrated below.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Physical Features Crossing National Boundaries: In the TGN, if a physical feature crosses a boundary, it is placed under the next highest level in the hierarchy. In other words, the river or mountain range is placed under the level of the hierarchy that entirely contains it. For example, the Amazon river crosses national boundaries, so it is placed under the next highest level, the continent of South America.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Sort order in the hierarchy
    Siblings in the hierarchies are usually arranged alphabetically. However, they are sometimes arranged by another logical order, for example, in chronological order, as in the example below.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    For siblings at any level, implementers should build displays using the Sort_order, followed by an alphabetical sort. (In an alphabetical display all Sort_order designations are "1," and will therefore be sorted alphabetically in the second sort.) The Sort_order number is hidden from end-users.

  • Historical flag for the Parent
    Indicates if the link between the child and its parent is current or historical. Most relationships in the TGN are flagged Current; if the flag is Current, it is generally not displayed to end-users unless there is a Display Date. If the flag is Historical, it is displayed (e.g., "H" in the example below). Other flags could be used in future versions of the TGN.
     

    C = Current
    H = Historical
    B = Both current and historical
    U = Undetermined
    NA = Not Applicable
    BTP = Part/Whole
    BTS = Genus/Species
    BTG = Generic

     
  • Dates for the parent
    Dates comprise a Display Date, which is a note referring to a date or other information about the link between a child and its parent, and Start Date and End Date, which are years that delimit the span of time referred to in the Display Date. Start and End Dates index the Display Date for retrieval, but are hidden from end-users. The example below illustrates a historical relationship between the Nubia and historic Egypt.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    Start and End Dates are years in the proleptic Gregorian calendar, which is the calendar produced by extending the Gregorian calendar to dates preceding its official introduction. Dates BCE are expressed as negative numbers. If the relationship extends to the current time, the End Date is 9999.

  • Hierarchy Relationship Type
    Indicates the type of relationship between a hierarchical child and its parent, expressed in the jargon of controlled vocabulary standards. An example of a whole/part relationship is Tuscany is a part of Italy (TGN). An example of genus/species relationship is calcite is a type of mineral (AAT). An example of the instance relationship is Rembrandt van Rijn is an example of a Person (ULAN). Most hierarchical relationships in TGN are Whole/Part.
  •  

    G=Genus/Species (generic) or BTG
    P=Whole/Part (partitive) or BTP
    I=Instance or BTI

     

  • Place Types
    Words or phrases describing a role or characteristic of the place (e.g., inhabited place, cultural center). Places in the TGN can be either physical or political entities. They include physical features such as continents, rivers, and mountains; and political entities, such as empires, nations, states, districts, townships, cities, and neighborhoods. The place type in the TGN is a term that characterizes a significant aspect of the place, including its role, function, political anatomy, size, or physical characteristics. Place types are indexing terms based on the structured vocabulary of the AAT where possible. The example below illustrates place types for Marakesh, Morocco.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Place types for main political divisions: Place types are used to mark the significant administrative levels of the hierarchy. Given that there is no predictable number of levels in the TGN hierarchy, certain place types are used in order to allow some users to create hierarchies that have a set number of levels, when necessary (i.e., some users have systems that require a set number of levels). These designations are intended to work with inhabited places, but not necessarily with physical features. The place type is either the preferred place type or the place type in position number 2: See also the discussion Hierarchical Positions above. The divisions are the following, in descending order:

    • continent - (preferred place type)
    • primary political unit - (place type in positon #2, for nations, empires, etc.)
    • first level subdivision - (place type in positon #2)
    • second level subdivision - (place type in positon #2)
    • inhabited place or deserted settlement - (preferred place type)
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Preferred flag for Place Types
    One place type is flagged preferred for each place, to provide a default when creating displays. Preferred following a place type (as seen in the examples) indicates that this is the place type that should appear with the place in displays.

  • Display order for Place Types
    Place types are arranged in a particular order by the editors. Implementers should sort the names by the Display_order number, which is included in the data files, but typically hidden from end-users.

  • Dates for Place Types
    Dates comprise a Display Date, which is a note referring to a date or other information about the place relative to the place type (e.g., for the place type inhabited place for Delhi, India below), and Start Date and End Date, which are years that delimit the span of time referred to in the Display Date. Start and End Dates index the Display Date for retrieval, but are hidden from end-users.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    Start and End Dates are years in the proleptic Gregorian calendar. Dates BCE are indexed with negative numbers. If the place type is still applicable to the current place, the End Date is 9999.

  • Related Places
    Associative relationships to other places in the TGN, particularly any important ties or connections between places, excluding hierarchical whole/part relationships. The example below illustrates related places in the record for South Sea Islands.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    Each reference comprises a relationship type plus a link to the related entity. For end-user displays, the related entity should be represented by the preferred name, place type, parent string (simply World in the examples above), and subject ID for the related place.

  • Relationship Type
    A term or phrase characterizing the relationship between the place at hand and the linked place. In the example above, the Relationship Type in the record for South Sea Islands indicates that in TGN this place is distinguished from Oceania and the Pacific Islands. Relationship Types are reciprocal (that is, linked to both records), drawn from a controlled list that comprises the controlled phrase and a numeric code, as illustrated below. The codes are hidden from end-users.
     

    Code

    Focus Entity

    Related Code

    3001

    distinguished from

    3001

    3301

    ally of

    3301

    3411

    successor of

    3412

    3412

    predecessor of

    3411

     
  • Historical flag for the Related Place
    Indicates if the link between the related places is current or historical. Generally, if the flag is set to Current, it is not displayed to end-users; if it is set to Historical, it is displayed (as in the example for Florence, Italy below).
     

    C = Current
    H = Historical
    B = Both current and historical
    U = Undetermined
    NA = Not Applicable

     
  • Dates for the Related Place
    Dates comprise a Display Date, which is a note referring to a date or other information about the relationship between the two places, and Start Date and End Date, which are years that delimit the span of time referred to in the Display Date. Start and End Dates index the Display Date for retrieval, but are hidden from end-users. The example below illustrates a related place in the record for Florence, Italy.
     

    Example
    Example

     
    Start and End Dates are years in the proleptic Gregorian calendar.

  • Contributors
    The institutions or projects that contributed information to the TGN record. In order to give due credit to the contributing institution, it is required that implementers display a reference to the contributor to end-users.

    References to contributors are drawn from a controlled list comprising a numeric ID, a brief name, and a full name. The end-user must have access to the brief name and the full name. The Brief Name is the initials, abbreviations, or acronyms for the contributing projects or institutions (in square brackets in the display below). Contributors may be linked to the record in three ways: with the names, with the record as a whole (subject), and with the note (scope note). In the example below, end-users may click on the initials of the contributor in the Full Record Display, which produces a fuller description of the contributor name.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Sources
    The TGN record generally includes the bibliographic sources for the names. Most names were found in authoritative publications on the given topic or in standard general reference works, including dictionaries and encyclopedias. In order to give due credit to published sources, it is required that implementers display a reference to the published source to end-users.

    References to sources are drawn from a controlled list comprising a numeric ID, a brief citation, and a full citation. The end-user must have access to the brief citation and the full citation. Sources may be linked to the record in three ways: with the names, with the record as a whole (subject), and with the note (scope note). In the example below, end-users may click on the brief citation in the Full Record Display, which displays a full citation for that source.
     

    Example
    Example

     
  • Page Number
    A reference to a volume, page, date of accessing a Web site, or heading reference in a source (as seen following the brief citation (in black following the blue citations in the above example).

  • Revision History
    The editorial history of each TGN record is captured in the Revision History, which identifies when records and names have been added, edited, merged, etc. The Revision History is included with the licensed files, but hidden from end-users. This information allows implementers to update the TGN in their system with each new release.


Sample Record

Example
Example



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Revised 27 February 2014


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