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3. Editorial Rules, continued
 
 

3

EDITORIAL RULES, CONTINUED

   

3.5

 

Associative Relationships

Included in this chapter

  • Example
    [from VCS, for Christopher Wren]

   

 

 

[from an end-user display, for Christopher Wren]

   

 

 

3.5.1

 

 

Related People and Corporate Bodies

 

 

 

3.5.1.1

 

 

Definition
Associative relationships to other persons and corporate bodies in the ULAN, particularly any important ties or connections between persons or corporate bodies (for corporate bodies - excluding hierarchical whole/part relationships).

 

 

 

3.5.1.2

 

 

Values
Values for the Related entity are concatenated automatically by the system, using the preferred name (and in displays on the Web, also including the preferred biography) from the linked record.

 

 

 

3.5.1.3

 

 

Sources: Warrant for linking the people or corporate bodies
The same standard general references that are appropriate for the Descriptive Note may be used to determine which persons and corporate bodies are related. See 3.4 Descriptive Note.

 

 

 

3.5.1.4

 

 

Discussion
Related People and Corporate Bodies are the associative relationships between the artist record at hand and other artist records in the ULAN. Only clear and direct relationships should be recorded.

  • Given that associative relationships may be used for retrieval, it is recommended not to frivolously make links between Related People and Corporate Bodies. Relationships should be made only between records that are directly related (and - for corporate bodies - where hierarchical relationships are inappropriate). If a thesaurus is bound together by too many associative relationships between entities that are only loosely or indirectly related, the value of the relationships in retrieval is lost. Consider this question: If the end-user is interested in retrieving Artist X, will he or she also want to retrieve Artist Y? If not, probably there should not be an associative relationship between the two records; consider whether the information about the second artist is better expressed in the Descriptive Note.

 

 

 

3.5.1.5

 

 

RULES

 

 

 

3.5.1.5.1

 

 

Minimum requirements
Related People and Corporate Bodies are not required. Link to Related People and Corporate Bodies as time and editorial priorities allow.

  • If you are researching a given artist, and if you come across information appropriate to create a link to a Related People and Corporate Bodies, add it.

 

 

 

3.5.1.5.2

 

 

  • When to make Associative Relationships
    Make links to Related People and Corporate Bodies when it is useful to the end-user to have a cross-reference to the other persons and corporate bodies. Think in terms of retrieval: Would such a link be useful in a search engine? If not, do not make a link to the Related People and Corporate Bodies (instead, you may mention the other place in the Descriptive Note, if warranted).

    Confusion between two persons or corporate bodies

    If there is a significant possibility that two persons or corporate bodies may be confused because they have historically been confused or the identities of the artists may be the same (e.g., an anonymous artist is possibly identified as a named artist), link them as Related People and Corporate Bodies.

      • Example
        [for the Master of King René of Anjou]

 

 

 

 

  • Homographs
    If the only cause of potential confusion is that the artists have the same or similar names, do not link them as Related People and Corporate Bodies unless they are members of the same family. In most cases, the Display Biography of the artists will be enough to distinguish them; in the rare case that there has been historical confusion between the two people or corporate bodies, describe the issue regarding their similar names in the Descriptive Note (see Chapter 3.3). See also Families below.

  • Variant names vs. separate records for persons
    If scholarly opinion is divided as to whether or not one person is the same artist as another, make separate records for each artist and link them with relationship type: possibly identified with. This typically occurs with anonymous masters or other artists whose identity is in question. For example, Barth$00elemy d' Eyck is possibly, but not firmly, identified with Master of King Ren$00e of Anjou. Given that the association is uncertain, do not put the name Master of King Ren$00e of Anjou in the record for Barth$00elemy d' Eyck. Make two separate records and link them through Associative Relationships.

      • Example
        [for the Master of King René of Anjou]
      • Relationship Type: possibly identified with
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Eyck, Barth$00elemy d' (Netherlandish painter, active in France, documented 1444, died ca. 1476)

  • If scholars generally agree that both identities represent a single artist, make only one record for the person and include the other names as variant names (rather than making two records and linking them through associative relationships, e.g., for Robert Campin who was formerly known as the anonymous Master of Flémalle). See 3.3 Names.

 

 

  • Variant names vs. separate records for corporate bodies
    If one firm or other corporate body is the historical counterpart to a later firm (both may have similar names), link them as Related Corporate Bodies. There is another option: If the name of a firm or other legally incorporated entity has changed, perhaps you should include the former names in one record, rather than making two records and linking them. The latter is the better option when possible, because it reduces unnecessary complexity in the records.

    • One record: Generally include former names in one record for the entity rather than making two records 1) if the entity is a historical studio or institution (e.g., Manufacture Royale des Gobelins and Manufacture Nationale des Gobelins are two names in the same record), or 2) if the primary partners have remained the same for a modern firm. See 3.3 Names.

    • Two records: Generally make two records 1) for historical entities, if the function or location of the historical entity changed with the name change, or 2) if the question involves a modern firm and legal incorporation, the primary partners have changed, and the firm apparently prefers to clearly distinguish its separate incarnations.

      • Make a decision based on the way the issue is presented on the firm's Web page or other official publication, and the way the firm is listed in scholarly publications. For example, based on the use of the terms in scholarly literature, Adler & Sullivan and Adler and Sullivan, Architects are different names for a single firm, but the earlier firms Burling & Adler and D. Adler & Co. are each separate firms.

      • Link two firms as Related Corporate Bodies only if there is a direct historical or other relationship between the two entities. Do not link entities that have nothing in common other than one or more members; for example, in the example above, Burling & Adler and D. Adler & Co. are not linked to each other because the only characteristic they share is the member Dankmar Adler. However, D. Adler & Co. and Adler & Sullivan are linked with an associative relationship because both Dankmar Adler and Louis H. Sullivan worked as primary architects in both firms, and the later firm is generally considered a successor of the earlier one in scholarly literature.

      • Example
        [for D. Adler & Co.]
      • Relationship Type: predecessor of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Adler & Sullivan (American architectural firm, founded in 1883)

 

 

  • Student/teacher relationships
    Include major student/teacher relationships for the artist, as time and editorial priorities allow.

      • Example
        [partial list for Rembrandt van Rijn]
      • Relationship Type: student of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Lastman, Pieter (Dutch painter and draftsman, 1583-1633)

      • Relationship Type: teacher of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Backer, Jacob Adriaensz (Dutch painter, 1608-1651)

      • Relationship Type: teacher of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Bol, Ferdinand (Dutch history and portrait painter, 1616-1680)

      • Relationship Type: teacher of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Dou, Gerrit (Dutch painter and draftsman, 1613-1675)
        [etc.]

 

 

  • Members of firms
    Link a firm, studio, or manufactory to its members as time and editorial priorities allow. If you link one member to a firm, you must link all of the major members to the firm. If a major member is not in ULAN, add him or her and link their record to the firm.

      • Examples
        [for Frank Lloyd Wright]
      • Relationship Type: founder of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Oak Park Studio (American architectural firm, established ca. 1896, dissolved 1909)

        [for I. M. Pei & Partners]
      • Relationship Type: founded by
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Pei, I. M. (American architect, born 1917, born in China)

      • Relationship Type: partner was (firm to person)
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Cobb, Henry Nichols (American architect, born 1926)

      • Relationship Type: partner was (firm to person)
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Fredenburgh, Harold (American architect, contemporary)

      • Relationship Type: partner was (firm to person)
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Freed, James Ingo (American architect, born 1930)

      • Relationship Type: partner was (firm to person)
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Jacobson, Leonard (American architect, 1921-1992)

      • Relationship Type: partner was (firm to person)
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Leonard, Eason H. (American architect, contemporary)

      • Relationship Type: partner was (firm to person)
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Wandelmaier, Werner (American architect, active after 1955)

 

 

  • Families
    For artists and major patrons, link members of families to each other, if the members are in ULAN. If you link one artist to any family member, link him or her to all of their prominent family members.

    • If there is a major member of a family missing in ULAN (and if the family member is an artist, patron, or related to the arts), add him or her and link to them.

    • For artists with names that are homographs containing a designation of family, such as the elder or Jr., if the artist with the homographic name is not in ULAN, add a record for him and link the family members.

      • Examples
        [for Gao Jianfu]
      • Relationship Type: sibling of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Gao Qifeng (Chinese painter, 1889-1935)

        [for Artemisia Gentileschi]
      • Relationship Type: child of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Gentileschi, Orazio (Italian painter, 1563-1639)

      • Relationship Type: spouse of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Stiattesi, Pietro (Italian painter, active 17th century)

        [for Pieter Bruegel the Elder ]
      • Relationship Type: child by marriage (in-law) of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Coecke van Aelst, Pieter, the elder (Flemish artist, architect, and author, 1502-1550)

      • Relationship Type: child by marriage (in-law) of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Verhulst, Mayken (Flemish painter, ca. 1520-1600)

      • Relationship Type: grandparent of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Brueghel, Ambrosius (Flemish painter, 1617-1675)

      • Relationship Type: grandparent of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Brueghel, Jan, the younger (Flemish painter and draftsman, 1601-1678)

      • Relationship Type: grandparent of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Brueghel, Pieter, III (Flemish painter, born 1589, died after 1608)

      • Relationship Type: parent of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Brueghel, Jan, the elder (Flemish painter, draftsman, 1568-1625)

      • Relationship Type: parent of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Brueghel, Pieter, the younger (Flemish artist, born 1564 or 1565, died 1637 or 1638)

      • Relationship Type: member of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Brueghel family (Flemish painters, active 16th-17th centuries)

    • Exception: In general, do not make a record for a family member if that person is not an artist or a major patron. In such cases, if the family member is otherwise significant to the career of the artist, mention him or her in the Descriptive Note (see 3.4).

    • Record for the family per se: For major families of artists or patrons, make a record for the family and link the members to the family record. You will generally need to construct a name (e.g., Brueghel family; see also 3.3 Names), because the name per se will rarely be found in a source. If you link to any member of the family, you must link to all of the family members who are in ULAN. In addition, you must add major family members if they are not already in ULAN.

      • Example
        [for the record "Brueghel family"]

   
    • Exception: Do not make a record for the family if there are only two or three members. Make a family record only when there are several or many family members, and when the history of the family as an entity is significant and warrants separate discussion.

   
  • Corporate Bodies: Hierarchical vs. Associative Relationships
    For corporate bodies, do not make associative relationships when hierarchical relationships are more appropriate. For the administrative subdivisions of institutions, manufactories and other entities, use the hierarchical relationships rather than Related People and Corporate Bodies (which are associative relationships).

    • See the list of Relationship Types below for further examples of when to make Related People and Corporate Bodies.

   

 

 

3.5.2

   

Relationship Type

   

 

3.5.2.1

   

Definition
A term or phrase characterizing the relationship between the person or corporate body at hand and the linked person or corporate body.

     

3.5.2.2

   

Values
Values are chosen from a controlled list comprising a code and phrase. Each code-plus-phrase is linked to another code, which is the reciprocal relationship.

      • Example
        [partial view of controlled list from VCS]
   

   

3.5.2.3

   

RULES

   

 

3.5.2.3.1

   

Appropriate Relationship Types
It is required to include a Relationship Type for each Related Person and Corporate Body.

  • Choose the specific suitable Relationship Type, if possible. If necessary, use the broad related to as a default.

   
  • Link to the correct side of the relationship
    Remember that Relationship Types are reciprocal (that is, linked to both records). When you choose a Relationship Type, make sure that the Relationship Type and its counterpart will work from the points of view of both linked records.

    • For some relationships, the relationship type is the same on both sides of the link; however, for others it is different depending upon which record you are in. Be very careful to choose the correct relationship for the focus record (i.e., the record you are in when you make the relationship). Consider what will make sense when displayed to a user. For example, if you are in the record of a teacher, the relationship type linking to the student is "1101 teacher of," because the artist in the focus record is the teacher of the artist in the linked record. If you open the record for the linked artist, the reciprocal relationship type will be "1102 student of." If you have a question about which side of the relationship applies to your record, ask your supervisor before making the link.

      • Example
        [for Jan Thomas, whose master was Rubens; in Rubens' record, Rubens was the master of Thomas]
      • Relationship Type: master was
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Rubens, Peter Paul

  • Caveat: When relationship types are homographs, be very careful to link to the correct one. For example, as illustrated below, if you are linking an uncle to his niece, be sure to link to "uncle of" #1533, which has the code for "niece of" #1534 as its reciprocal code. Do NOT link to the homograph "uncle of" #1532, because its reciprocal code is for "nephew of."

1531

nephew of

1532

1532

uncle of

1531

1533

niece of

1534

1534

uncle of

1533

 

   
  • Avoid redundant links
    With rare exceptions, you should not make multiple links between any two entities. If two relationships apply between two entities, make only the most important relationship. For example, if there is a father/son relationship, do not also make a teacher/student relationship between the two.

    • In general, do not make relationships between entities that have the relationship expressed in another way; for example, if members of a firm are linked to the firm, do not link the members to each other. Exception: Link family members to each other, even if they are also linked to a separate record for the family (because this is the only way to express the specific relationship between members, e.g., uncle/nephew). See the examples of the Brueghel family above.

   
  • Definitions of Relationship Types
    Apply Relationship Types according to the implied significance of hierarchical placement and the definitions in the table below. Do not use the "guide terms" with angled brackets; these are for organizational purposes only.

   »List of relationship types:

   
    • general
      related to: General designation for relationships, where no specific relationship is known or appropriate.
      associated with: For generic professional relationships.miscellaneous: Do not use; for problematic data loads only.
      possibly identified with: For two records that may possibly represent the same artist, but this fact is not firmly established and accepted. (If it is generally accepted by scholars that both names refer to the same person, put both names in the same record.)
      distinguished from: For two artists who are often confused for each other. Do not use for artists who simply have similar names; use only for artists who historically have been confused in scholarly research.

1000

related to

1000

1001

miscellaneous

1001

1003

associated with

1003

1005

possibly identified with

1005

1006 formerly identified with 1006

1007

distinguished from

1007

1008 meaning / usage overlaps with 1008

   

   
    • <person to person - teaching/learning>
      The following relationships may be used, as appropriate and described in scholarly literature. These refer to relationships between two people.

1101

teacher of

1102

1102

student of

1101

1105

apprentice of

1106

1106

apprentice was

1105

1107

influenced

1108

1108

influenced by

1107

1111

master of

1112

1112

master was

1111

1113

fellow student of

1113

   

 

   
    • <person to person / person to firm - patronage>
      Generally for relationships between artists and patrons.

1201

patron of

1202

1202

patron was

1201

1205

client of

1206

1206

client was

1205

1211

artist to

1212

1212

artist was

1211

1213

court artist to

1214

1214

court artist was

1213

1217

employee of

1218

1218

employee was

1217

1221

appointed by

1222

1222

appointee of

1221

   

 

   
    • <person to person - professional collaboration>
      For artists who worked together as peers (or with one assisting another), not in a master/student relationship.

1301

colleague of

1301

1302

associate of

1302

1303

collaborated with

1303

1305

worked with

1305

1306

performed with

1306

1307

assistant of

1308

1308

assisted by

1307

1311

partner of

1311

   

 

   
    • <person to firm/group - professional collaboration>
      For artists who worked for a firm, studio, artist family, or other corporate body. For families, use member of.

1313

partner in

1314

1314

partner was/is (firm to person)

1313

1315 principal in (person to firm) 1316
1316 principal was/is (firm to person) 1315

1317

member of

1318

1318

member was

1317

1321

school of

1322

1322

school was

1321

   

   
    • <firm/group to firm/group>
      For firms or other corporate bodies where one followed another chronologically and was clearly the successor of the other.

1411

successor of

1412

1412

predecessor of

1411

1413

administration overlaps with

1413

   

 

   
    • <person to person - family relationships>
      For people related as family members to other people.

1500

related to (familial)

1500

1501

sibling of

1501

1511

child of

1512

1512

parent of

1511

1513

grandchild of

1514

1514

grandparent of

1513

1515

great-grandparent of

1516

1516

great-grandchild of

1515

1521

cousin of

1521

1531

nephew of

1532

1532

uncle of

1531

1533

niece of

1534

1534

uncle of

1533

1535

nephew of

1536

1536

aunt of

1535

1537

neice of

1538

1538

aunt of

1537

1541

spouse of

1541

1542 consort of 1543
1543 consort was 1542
1544 significant other of 1544
1545 mistress of 1546
1546 mistress was 1547
1547 romantic partner of 1547
1550 relative by marriage (in-law) 1550

1551

sibling by marriage (in-law) of

1551

1552

parent by marriage (in-law) of

1553

1553

child by marriage (in-law) of

1552

1554

adoptive parent of

1555

1555

adoptive child of

1554

1556

half-sibling of

1556

1557

step-sibling of

1557

1561

step-child of

1562

1562

step-parent of

1561

1571

guardian of

1573

1573

ward of

1571

1574

godparent of

1575

1575

godchild of

1574

1581

descendent of

1582

1582

ancestor of

1581

1590

possibly related to (familial)

1590

   

 

   
    • <person to person - personal relationship>
      For personal relationships, outside of family ties.

2550

friend of

2550

   

 

   
    • <person to institution - professional/administrative>
      For professional or administrative relationships between people and institutions.

2572

founder of

2573

2573

founded by

2572

2574

director of

2575

2575

directed by

2574

2650

publisher was (person to institution)

2651

2651

publisher of

2650

2674

professor at (person to institution)

2675

2675

professor was (institution to person)

2674

2676

teacher at (person to institution)

2677

2677

teacher was (institution to person)

2676

2692

president of (person to institution)

2693

2693

president was (institution to person)

2692

2696

leader of (person to institution)

2697

2697

leader was (institution to person)

2696

2778

owner of

2779

2779

owned by

2778

2794

representative of (person to institution)

2795

2795

representative was (institution to person)

2794

2828

student at (person to institution)

2829

2829

student was (institution to person)

2828

2840

performer with (person to group)

2841

2841

performer was (group to person)

2840

     

3.5.2.3.2

   

Adding new Relationship Types
Most of the necessary Relationship Types should already be included in the controlled list. If you feel that you wish to add another Relationship Type to this list, consult with your supervisor.

     

 

3.5.3

   

Historical Flag

   

 

3.5.3.1

   

Definition
Flag indicating the historical status of the relationship between Related People and/or Corporate Bodies.

      • Example
        [for Otto Ludwig Sinding]

   

 

3.5.3.2

   

Values
C - Current, H - Historical, B - Both, N/A - Not Applicable, U - Undetermined

   

 

3.5.3.3

   

RULES

  • The default flag for the relationship is Not Applicable (NA).

    • N/A: Generally, leave the flag as Not Applicable. If you feel that another flag is appropriate, consult with your supervisor.

    • Current: For relationships that still exist.

    • Historical: For a historical relationship that no longer exists.

    • Both: For a relationship that is both Current and Historical.

    • Undetermined: This flag is used primarily for problem data that is loaded into VCS.

     

 

3.5.4

   

Dates for Related People and Corporate Bodies

     

3.5.4.1

   

Definition
Dates delimiting the relationship between the related persons or corporate bodies.

      • Example
        [for Frans Hals]

   

 

3.5.4.2

   

Fields
There are three fields: Display Date, Start Date, and End Date.

   

 

3.5.4.3

   

Values
Display Date is a free-text field; values may be any ASCII character; no special characters or diacritics are allowed; diacritics must be expressed according to the codes in Appendix A.

  • Start Date and End Date must contain valid years, validated by VCS.

     

3.5.4.4

   

Sources
The dates should be determined using the same standard reference works that supply other information about the relationship.

     

3.5.4.5

   

Discussion
The Display Date for the relationship usually refers to a period or date, however, it may sometimes contain notes that do not explicitly make reference to a date. In such cases, the note should implicitly refer to a date or datable condition or event, because you are required to include a Start Date and End Date with every Display Date.

  • Display dates are indexed with Start Date and End Date. Start and End Dates are controlled by special formatting; dates BCE are represented by negative numbers.
     

3.5.4.6

   

RULES

  • Dates are not required. However, if you enter data in any of the three fields, you must enter data in ALL three of the fields.

  • The dates appear on reciprocal links. That means that the same dates will appear in BOTH records. Write the Display Dates and assign Start and End Dates so that they will be correct and unambiguous in both records. Repeat the names of the person or corporate body in the Display Date when necessary to avoid ambiguity, as in the example below.

      • Example
        [for Pierre Subleyras]
      • Relationship Type: student of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Rivalz, Antoine (French painter and printmaker, 1667-1735)
        Display Date: Subleyras entered Rivalz's workshop in Toulouse in 1717
        Start Date: 1717 End Date: 1720

  • A brief set of rules for Dates appears below. See also Appendix B and Dates for Names in Chapter 3.3 Names.
     

3.5.4.6.1

   

Display Date

  • Follow the style of existing Display Dates.

      • Examples
        [for Alfred Stieglitz]
      • Relationship Type: spouse of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: O'Keeffe, Georgia (American painter, 1887-1986)
        Display Date: 1924-1946
        Start Date: 1924 End Date: 1946

        [for Michael Palladino]
      • Relationship Type: partner in
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Richard Meier & Partners (American architectural firm, contemporary)
        Display Date: since 1985
        Start Date: 1985 End Date: 2054

        [for Gobelins]
      • Relationship Type: directed by
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Le Brun, Charles (French designer, painter, and draftsman, 1619-1690)
        Display Date: appointed as artistic director 8 March 1663
        Start Date: 1633 End Date: 1690
      • Relationship Type: directed by
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Mignard, Pierre, I (French painter and portraitist, 1612-1695)
        Display Date: succeeded Le Brun in 1690
        Start Date: 1690 End Date: 1695

  • Do not use an initial capital, unless the word is a proper name.

  • Do not use full sentences; do not end the display date with a period or any other punctuation.

  • Typically the display date should refer, explicitly or implicitly, to a time period or date associated with the link between the Related People and Corporate Bodies.

  • If a date is uncertain, use a broad or vague designation or other terms such as ca. and probably to express uncertainty (e.g., the word probably in the example below).

      • Example
        [for Niccol$02o di ser Sozzo Tegliacci]
      • Relationship Type: apprentice was
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Bartolo di Fredi (Sienese painter, active by 1353, died 1410)
        Display Date: Bartolo was probably the apprentice of Niccol$02o, probably after Black Death of 1348
        Start Date: 1348 End Date: 1358

  • In some cases, the Display Date may be used to record unusual or important information about the Related People and Corporate Bodies relationship (see the example below), but not referring explicitly to a date. However, dates should be implicit in the condition or event mentioned and you should have a period or date in mind, because - if you record a Display Date - Start and End dates are required.

      • Example
        [for Jan Joest]
      • Relationship Type: related to (familial)
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Baegert, Derick (German artist, active 1476-1515)
        Display Date: probably a close relative
        Start Date: 1455 End Date: 1519
     

3.5.4.6.2

   

Start Date and End Date
Use dates that most broadly delimit the span of time of the relationship referred to in the display date. In many cases, the years will be approximate. When in doubt, it is better to estimate too broad a span rather than too narrow a span. See the Date Authority in Appendix B for approximate dates of historic events and entities; you should also consult other, related records in ULAN to establish dates.

  • Dates must be expressed in the proleptic Gregorian calendar, which is the Gregorian calendar projected back in time before it came into existence.

  • Express dates BCE with negative numbers, using a hyphen before the number. Do not use commas or any other punctuation
    .
      • Example
        [for Julius Caesar]
      • Relationship Type: patron of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: Arkesilaos (Greek sculptor, active mid-1st century BCE)
        Display Date: ca. 46 BCE
        Start Date: -51 End Date: -41

  • For relationships that are in place until the end of the artist's life or the dissolution of the corporate body, use the Death Date as the End Date for the relationship.

      • Example
        [for Alfred Stiegltz, he was married to Georgia O'Keeffe at the time of his death in 1946]
      • Relationship Type: spouse of
        Related Person or Corporate Body: O'Keeffe, Georgia (American painter, 1887-1986)
        Display Date: 1924-1946
        Start Date: 1924 End Date: 1946
       

Last updated 22 October 2013
Document is subject to frequent revisions

 




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