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J. Paul Getty Trust

March 2014

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E X H I B I T I O N

Connecting Seas: A Visual History of Discoveries and Encounters
Exhibition through April 13, 2014
GRI Galleries I and II

The legend of a race of men with faces in their chests is believed to have originated with Persian scholar Zakariyah al-Qazwini in the 13th century, but he was not the last to record the apocryphal story. The Italian poet, diplomat, and statesman Giovanni Botero included his own version in the book Le relationi universali, published 400 years later. Editions of both al-Qazwini's and Botero's texts are on display as part of Connecting Seas.

Experts lead special gallery tours Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2:00 p.m.

Learn more about the exhibition.

Man from the Wilds of Asia, from Le relationi universali, Giovanni Botero, 1618. The Getty Research Institute, 85-B15519

E V E N T S

Imagining the Conquest of Mexico
Lecture
Wednesday, March 12, 2014
7:00 p.m.
Museum Lecture Hall, The Getty Center

Explore divergent accounts of the Spanish conquest of 16th-century Aztec Mexico through the eyes of the Spanish conquerers and Mexico's indigenous inhabitants. UCLA professor Kevin Terraciano uses books and prints from the time period to elucidate how these historic moments of encounter were documented visually.

This lecture complements the Connecting Seas exhibition.

Reserve a free ticket to this event.

Woodcut map of Tenochtitlan (detail), Hernán Cortés, Cartas de relación, 1524. The Getty Research Institute, 93-B9631
Object of Plunder: The Congo through the Centuries
Lecture
Sunday, March 16, 2014
2:00 p.m.
Museum Lecture Hall, The Getty Center

Adam Hochschild, author of King Leopold's Ghost, traces the history of the Congo through photographs, cartoons, posters, and other documents. In particular, Hochschild details the exploration and exploitation of the Congo under King Leopold II of Belgium and discusses the repercussions of the regime.

This lecture complements the Connecting Seas exhibition.

Reserve a free ticket to this event.

The Belgian parliament questions the king's equivocal use of religion. From "The Congo Free Graveyard," special issue of L'assiette au beurre, no. 376, 1908. The Getty Research Institute, 84-S772
Save the Date: Cornelia Funke Storytelling and Book Signing
April 6, 2014
2:00 p.m.
Harold M. Williams Auditorium, The Getty Center

Bestselling children's book author Cornelia Funke reads from a selection of her works. Recommended for families and kids ages 8 and up.

Reserve a free ticket to this event.

Download Cornelia Funke's gallery guide, written for kids visiting the Connecting Seas exhibition. Copies are also available in the galleries.

A N N O U N C E M E N T S

Smithsonian Libraries Contributes to the Getty Research Portal™

Over 2,000 volumes on topics such as design, craft, fashion, and African history from the Smithsonian's Special Collections and Art & Design libraries are now accessible through the Getty Research Portal. The Portal currently provides access to nearly 31,000 digitized art history titles from 14 institutions, free of charge.

Find out more about the Getty Research Portal.

Search the Getty Research Portal.

Plate 78 (detail) from The Grammar of Ornament, Owen Jones, 1856. The Smithsonian Libraries

P U B L I C A T I O N S

Getty Research Journal, no. 6
New Issue

The most recent issue of the Getty Research Journal features essays on David Alfaro Siqueiros's recently conserved mural, América Tropical, the drawings of Élie-Honoré Montagny, and the significance of D.O. Hill's painting The Market Cross, Ayr in relation to early photography.

Read essay abstracts and buy the journal.

View this issue on JSTOR.

N E W   &   N O T A B L E   O N   T H E   W E B

Frederick Hammersley Archive, 1948–1980
Finding Aid

This collection of sketchbooks, notebooks, and paint sample charts provides meticulous technical details outlining the materials and processes used for paintings produced by Frederick Hammersley, a founder of hard-edge abstractionism. The archive also includes a small, unstretched canvas that is considered his first "Hunch" painting, a term he used to describe works composed by instinctually laying down color.

Browse the finding aid.

Read more about the archive.

Learn about the Getty Conservation Institute's work on the archive.








Banner image: Plate 78 (detail) from The Grammar of Ornament, Owen Jones, 1856. The Smithsonian Libraries
Notebooks and unfinished painting set up in Frederick Hammersley's studio in March 2012. © Frederick Hammersley Foundation. The Getty Research Institute, 2013.M.33

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