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Art Bound November 2010

November 2010

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In This Issue:

Imagining the Past in France
Roman Art
The Origins of Baroque Art in Rome
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N E W   F R O M   G E T T Y   P U B L I C A T I O N S

Imagining the Past in France:
History in Manuscript Painting, 1250-1500
Elizabeth Morrison and Anne D. Hedeman
Imagining the Past in France

From around 1250 to the close of the fifteenth century, the most important and original work being done in secular illumination was unquestionably in French vernacular history manuscripts. This volume celebrates the vivid historical imagery produced during these years by bringing together some of the finest masterpieces of illumination created in the Middle Ages. It is the first major publication to focus on exploring the ways in which text and illumination worked together to help show medieval readers the role and purpose of history. The images enabled the past to come alive before the eyes of medieval readers by relating the adventures of epic figures such as Hector of Troy, Alexander the Great, the Holy Roman Emperor Charlemagne, and even the Virgin Mary. An exhibition of the same name will be on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum from November 16, 2010, through February 6, 2011.

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Roman Art
Paul Zanker

Traditional studies of Roman art have sought to identify an indigenous style distinct from Greek art and in the process have neglected the large body of Roman work that creatively recycled Greek artworks. In this fresh assessment the author offers instead a cultural history of the functions of the visual arts, the messages that these images carried, and the values that they affirmed in late Republican Rome and the Empire. The analysis begins at the point at which the characteristic features of Roman art started to emerge, when the Romans were exposed to Hellenistic culture through their conquest of Greek lands in the third century B.C. As a result, the values and social and political structure of Roman society changed, as did the functions and character of the images it generated. This volume, presented in very clear and accessible language, offers new and fascinating insights into the evolution of the forms and meanings of Roman art.

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Roman Art
The Origins of Baroque Art in Rome
Alois Riegl
The Origins of Baroque Art in Rome

Delivered three times between 1898 and 1902 and subsequently revised with an eye toward publication, Alois Riegl's lectures on the origins of Baroque art in Rome broke new ground in its field. In his approach and content, Riegl offered a markedly different account from that of Heinrich Wölfflin and other contemporaries: the beginning of the new artistic era extending from the 1520s to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was to be judged by its own rules and not merely as a period of decline. This first English translation brings Riegl's compelling vision of the Baroque to life and amply illustrates his charisma as a lecturer. His text is full of perceptive observations on the most important artists of the period from Michelangelo to Caravaggio.

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G
An Avant-Garde Journal of Art, Architecture,
Design, and Film, 1923-1926
Edited by Detlef Mertins and Michael W. Jennings

The journal G: Material zur Elementaren Gestaltung appeared between 1923 and 1926 and featured a unique combination of visual works and writings by some of the most important names in European art and design. The list of contributors to the magazine during its short life reads like a roll call of the avant-garde: it includes Hans Arp, Walter Benjamin, Naum Gabo, George Grosz, Raoul Hausmann, El Lissitzky, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Man Ray, Hans Richter, Tristan Tzara, and Theo van Doesburg. What this disparate group had in common was a belief in Gestaltung, or "elemental form-creation," which placed emphasis on the process and the materials through which cultural objects are produced rather than on any "ism," style, or form. In G, works of engineering, technology, and popular culture took their place alongside paintings, films, poems, and sculptures, creating a complex and vivid image of urban modernity.

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Getty Publications produces award-winning titles that result from or complement the work of the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Getty Conservation Institute, and the Getty Research Institute. This wide variety of books covers the fields of art, photography, archaeology, architecture, conservation, and the humanities for both the general public and specialists. Publications include illustrated works on artists and art history, exhibition catalogues, works on cultural history, research on the conservation of materials and archaeological sites, scholarly monographs, critical editions of translated works, comprehensive studies of the Getty's collections, and educational books on art to interest children of all ages.
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