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Lesson Plans


Re: a massive quantity of crepe paper

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Michal Austin (whest177)
Thu, 09 Sep 1999 19:28:16 -0500


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> "I've been watching this topic because I also have alot of crepe
> paper. I like your idea...just need a bit more clarification. You are
> referring to the electric hand held mixer? I can't visualize how it wraps
> into a rope...my crepe paper is wide - are you using this or the party
> streamer type? If you have time, I'd appreciate the info."

Oops! I'm like one of those students who drive us all crazy in class - I didn't
listen carefully to the instructions before jumping in! *L* Yes, this is for the
party streamer type. Sorry, I don't have any unique ideas for the wider type.
There have been some good ideas from others on this so far!

"I saw your response regarding the crepe paper, the masks sound great. The
dollar store in our area has a wonderful selection of colors, really cheap
!!
Could you post the details of your lesson, or e-mail them to me. I would
like
to try it, I'm not sure if you mentioned the grade level or time frames.
What
kind of glue do you use to attach it, what are the requirements, boundaries
or subject matter examples that you use. "

When one end of the streamer is tied to the beater, it naturally twists into a
paper rope. I have used it with kids as young as third grade, and am sure my
junior high and high school classes would enjoy doing this also, except most
have already done it. I tie in whichever type mask best fits my curriculum at
the time - African, Northwest Coastal Indians, even animals one year! We fold
the tagboard in half, and draw out our design so it is symmetrical. Then we cut
it out. The tagboard seems flimsy for this project, but once the paper twists
are glued down, it is actually quite sturdy. We also cut out holes for the eyes.
I have the students pencil in any designs or special features, so that once they
begin gluing (plain, white school glue - since it dries clear) they don't forget
to add them in. Start in the center and work out, making sure the twists are
placed closely side by side so no tagboard shows through. I have my elementary
classes twice a week for 25 minutes. We spend 2 class periods creating a huge
box of twists, and 5 periods gluing them on. When a student is "between shifts"
during the twisting process, they are designing their masks. I'll try to get the
masks scanned and loaded onto my website during the next school week, so I'll
post the finished product then. Was I clear enough on this? or did I miss the
instructions again? *L*

Michal Austin (K-12 Art)

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"I've been watching this topic because I also have alot of crepe
paper.  I like your idea...just need a bit more clarification.  You are
referring to the electric hand held mixer?  I can't visualize how it wraps
into a rope...my crepe paper is wide -  are you using this or the party
streamer type? If you have time, I'd appreciate the info."
Oops! I'm like one of those students who drive us all crazy in class - I didn't listen carefully to the instructions before jumping in! *L* Yes, this is for the party streamer type. Sorry, I don't have any unique ideas for the wider type.  There have been some good ideas from others on this so far!

  "I saw your response regarding the crepe paper, the masks sound great. The
dollar store in our area has a wonderful selection of colors, really cheap
!!
Could you post the details of your lesson, or e-mail them to me. I would
like
to try it, I'm not sure if you mentioned the grade level or time frames.
What
kind of glue do you use to attach it, what are the requirements, boundaries
or subject matter examples that you use. "

When one end of the streamer is tied to the beater, it naturally twists into a paper rope. I have used it with kids as young as third grade, and am sure my junior high and high school classes would enjoy doing this also, except most have already done it. I tie in whichever type mask best fits my curriculum at the time - African, Northwest Coastal Indians, even animals one year! We fold the tagboard in half, and draw out our design so it is symmetrical. Then we cut it out. The tagboard seems flimsy for this project, but once the paper twists are glued down, it is actually quite sturdy. We also cut out holes for the eyes. I have the students pencil in any designs or special features, so that once they begin gluing (plain, white school glue - since it dries clear) they don't forget to add them in. Start in the center and work out, making sure the twists are placed closely side by side so no tagboard shows through. I have my elementary classes twice a week for 25 minutes. We spend 2 class periods creating a huge box of twists, and 5 periods gluing them on. When a student is "between shifts" during the twisting process, they are designing their masks. I'll try to get the masks scanned and loaded onto my website during the next school week, so I'll post the finished product then. Was I clear enough on this? or did I miss the instructions again? *L*

Michal Austin (K-12 Art)
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