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Lesson Plans


Re: Restated Issue

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
San D Hasselman (kprs)
Mon, 06 Sep 1999 22:26:04 -0400


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While I can not match "wits and words" with you, I can add these
thoughts.

First of all, as humans we have developed speech for a variety of
reasons that add up to "communication". Since we are basically all
(anyway anyone I know) products of a similar educational background
K-12, we have certain "code" words that we have learned since day one.

So, we learn to use those code words to "hee and haw" our team of
students through the lessons we set out for them. The 'evaluative'
words you use may be different that those I use, but my team may be
making furrows that are shorter or longer than yours.

I, put great stock in process. Product is individual. So I teach my
students to write thesis statements and declare their intentions. They
are "evaluated" by what they have said they "intended" to do. I guide
their journey, remembering that old theater addage "it's the FIRST TIME
for THEM". (I give grades as I am contracted to do, but my students
NEVER ask for grades from day one, as it is evident to them that grades
are just scribbles, and that personal outcome, done to the best of one's
abilities is where the 'studio's' emphasis lies).

Lastly, looking at the BIG picture, my evaluative murmurs, questions,
statements, clicks and chirps, do NOT great artwork make.

San D

Bob Beeching wrote:

> ISSUE: How can one evaluate a "non-verbal" discipline with
> "words"?____________________________________________________rb

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While I can not match "wits and words" with you, I can add these thoughts.

First of all, as humans we have developed speech for a variety of reasons that add up to "communication".  Since we are basically all (anyway anyone I know) products of a similar educational background K-12, we have certain "code" words that we have learned since day one.

So, we learn to use those code words to "hee and haw" our team of students through the lessons we set out for them.  The 'evaluative' words you use may be different that those I use, but my team may be making furrows that are shorter or longer than yours.

I, put great stock in process. Product is individual. So I teach my students to write thesis statements and declare their intentions.  They are "evaluated" by what they have said they "intended" to do. I guide their journey, remembering that old theater addage "it's the FIRST TIME for THEM". (I give grades as I am contracted to do, but my students NEVER ask for grades from day one, as it is evident to them that grades are just scribbles, and that personal outcome, done to the best of one's abilities is where the 'studio's' emphasis lies).

Lastly, looking at the BIG picture, my evaluative murmurs, questions, statements, clicks and chirps, do NOT great artwork make.

San D

Bob Beeching wrote:

  ISSUE:  How can one evaluate a "non-verbal" discipline with "words"?____________________________________________________rb
 

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