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Lesson Plans


RE: "Telephone" anyone?

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
D. Sterner (dsterner)
Mon, 6 Sep 1999 21:16:38 -0400


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Remember the game "telephone" were one whispers to another,
and at the end how the message changes?

yes I do...and the nature of the beast.

To think all this "talking about art" started with the proposition that
since visual art and physical education are, primarily, non-verbal
disciplines -
how can they be evaluated on strictly verbal terms?.

I wasn't under the impression they were. Participation, contribution
and content play a role in the grading factor.
One is evaluated, primarily, on physical performance, i.e. one either
draws or throws effectively
or not.

Draws effectively? What makes an effective drawing? Or do teachers
impose criteria based on how difficult an assignment is, rather than how
effective or meaningful.

The same goes for music. Musicians are not evaluated on how well they
speak of music, but on how well they play it.

Hmmm? I took a Music appreciation course in college from a guy who
never played a note and I know a bit about music and the various genres

A chef is evaluated on how well he designs and prepares meals not how
well he or she is able to
write recipes.

...Not if he/she wants to sell that book, get the job or create a name
for one's self!

two articles on assessment: An Assessment Adventure: What Arty
learned about grading art while teaching arithmetic, Journal of the Canadian
Society for Education
through Art, 16(2) 1995; and Recipe for Assessment: How Arty Cooked His
Goose While Grading Art, Art Education, March
1995.
________________________________________rb

respectfully,
-=deb=-
caterer/art teacher
.

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Remember the game "telephone" were one = whispers=20 to another,
and at the end how the message changes? 
 
 yes I do...and the = nature of the=20 beast.
 
To think all this "talking about art" = started=20 with the proposition that
since visual art and physical education are, = primarily,=20 non-verbal disciplines -
how can they be evaluated on strictly = verbal=20 terms?. 
 
I wasn't under the impression = they=20 were.  Participation, contribution and content play a role in = the=20 grading factor.
One is evaluated,  =20 primarily, on physical=20 performance, i.e. one either draws or throws=20 effectively  
or not. 
 
Draws effectively?  What = makes an=20 effective drawing?  Or do teachers impose criteria based on how = difficult an assignment is, rather than how effective or=20 meaningful.
 
 The same goes for music. = Musicians are=20 not evaluated on how well   = they speak of music, but on how well they play it. 
 
Hmmm?  I took a Music = appreciation=20 course in college from a guy who never played a note and I know a = bit about=20 music and the various genres
 
 A chef is evaluated = on =20 how well he designs and = prepares=20 meals not how well he or she is able to
write recipes. 
 
...Not if he/she wants to sell that book, get the job or = create a=20 name for one's self!
 
 two  articles on = assessment: An=20 Assessment   Adventure: What Arty learned = about grading=20 art while teaching arithmetic, Journal of the Canadian Society for=20 Education
through Art, 16(2) 1995; and Recipe for Assessment: How = Arty=20 Cooked His Goose While Grading Art, Art Education, March
1995.=20
________________________________________rb 
 
respectfully,
-=3Ddeb=3D-
caterer/art=20 teacher 
.
 
 
 
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