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Lesson Plans


FW: Reading and writing in art

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Bickley-Green, Cynthia Ann (BICKLEYGREENC)
Sun, 5 Sep 1999 20:37:38 -0400


> ----------
> From: Bickley-Green, Cynthia Ann
> Sent: Sunday, September 5, 1999 7:10 PM
> To: 'RWilk85411'
> Cc: 'artsednet.edu'
> Subject: RE: Reading and writing in art
>
> Thank you for mentioning this very important issue in art education. In
> the
> East Carolina University Math Art Project we have found that when we ask
> children what they have learned from a particular project every child has
> a
> different answer. This is an area of art education that needs more study
> and
> understanding.
>
> I would like to know if other art teachers on the artsednet have noticed
> this aspect of the teaching/learning transaction.
>
> C. Bickley-Green
> Director ECU Math Art Project
>
> > ----------
> > From: RWilk85411
> > Sent: Sunday, September 5, 1999 6:06 PM
> > To: artsednet.edu
> > Subject: Reading and writing in art
> >
> > It seems that some of us are forgetting that students learn in different
> > ways
> > and they need to demonstrate that learning in different ways to make it
> > fair
> > to them. Not only that but, if they are incapable of speaking or writing
>
> > about their artwork, they have not really learned very much.
> >
> > That is why every lesson in my classes includes the opportunity to
> > write/and
> > or speak about what they learned and how they used it. I also,
> > personally,
> > feel that it levels the playing field in my classroom to give them more
> > than
> > one way to demonstrate their learning. I, like almost everyone on this
> > list,
> > have students with learning disabilities, ESL students, as well as
> > students
> > who have no limitations but whose writing skills may be better than
> their
> > art
> > skills (due to our education system). I try to give them all a fair
> shot.
> > Sometimes they have learned more than their art work indicates.
> >
> > Then there are also fields in art that do not require production. I
> don't
> > want them to feel that there is no room for them in the world of art if
> > they
> > don't have a truckload of production talent. I have had two very good
> > friends
> > who went into art history because of their love of art and lack of
> > production
> > talent. One was the best art history teacher I have ever had. She was
> also
> >
> > one of the few truly inspirational teachers I ever had. What if she had
> > been
> > made to feel that there was no place for her because she didn't possess
> > very
> > good manual skills?
> >
> > No, we don't just talk, read, look at and write about art. We also make
> > art.
> > It is possible to do it all without any real strain. To argue otherwise,
> > to
> > me, is the same as to defend monkey-see-monkey-do projects over teaching
> > art.
> > Reatha
> >
>