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Lesson Plans


Sample rubric

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Lorena Nalin (nalin)
Sun, 28 Sep 1997 18:34:34 -0700 (MST)

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Ann,

In Arizona, our Career Ladder system requires that we demonstrate student
acheivement and it is preferred that performance-based assessments and
rubrics be used. Arizona has generic rubric for language arts and math for
the elementary teachers to use.

This is a portion from my Career Ladder report. The unit is on Pueblo
Pottery which integrate with the fourth grade Social Studies program. We
study Pueblo cultures in general and then look specifically at Zuni and
their Owl storyteller figures.

I have posted this rubric in the past, but here it is again. I have added
the objective and the "jaron" of the report. All in all, I enjoyed using
the rubric system and have used it with other units.

Lorena Nalin
Elementary Art Specialist
Tucson, AZ

Zuni Storyteller Owl unit
*************************

This unit covers the areas of art production, art history, art criticism
and aesthetics; however, the student progress will only address the
production component.

A. Main Objectives :
1. Students will create an owl figure in the style of the Zuni Storyteller
Owl (key characteristics), using attached pinch pot construction.
(Synthesis)
2. Students will rank non-identified student examples and their own Owl
Storyteller according to rubric for construction and decoration
(Evaluation)

Sub-objectives:
1. Review prerequisite skills: high-quality pinch pot (Application)
2. Students will recognize design qualities of Pueblo pottery (Analysis)
3. Through various modes (videotapes, books and art prints), students will
appreciate the role of arts and crafts in Pueblo culture (Understanding)

B. Teacher activities:
1. Review files for previous developed materials (maps, timelines, print
examples, etc.) Revise outdated materials and
collect new resources as needed
2. Reserve A/V materials and monitor
3. Display critical art vocabulary for media/process, critical attributes
and historical/cultural references
4. Prepare individual portions of clay
5. Administer prior knowledge quiz.
6. Organize tools, supplies and make slip
7. Show videotapes on Pueblo Arts & Crafts and culture
8. Identify and discuss the standard rubric for pinch pots
9. Using E.E.I. format, teach the basics involved in ceramic process of
pinch pot
10. Locate storage space and identification system
11. Transport and load bone dry clay into kiln
12. Complete firing process (bisque)
13. Identify and discuss the standard rubric for Storyteller
14. Model all techniques and steps students will use in producing their
own artwork
15. Locate "Shards" puzzle game.
16. Prepare materials to be used to decorate owl figures
17. Organize tools, supplies and paints
18. Choose examples for student rating exercise

Student Activities:

1. Review procedures and construct a well-made pinch pot
2. Respond to five knowledge level questions for clay and its processes
3. Construct two pinch pots to form the body of owl figure
4. Join the two pots (opening to opening) and blend surface to eliminate
evidence of seam (joining) line
5. Students will assess selected examples (at various levels on the
rubric) and score them accordingly. Accuracy and agreement with teacher
assessment for their evaluation will be scored for pre-assessment
6. Using a additive clay process, add beak, horns, eyes, wings, tail and
"baby" owls on wings
7. Refine craftsmanship to include smooth surfaces and well attached additions
8. Label with identify marks
9. Play "Shards" game on design differences
10. Decorate with tempera paints in earth tones
11. Using rubric, students will evaluate their final project, the Zuni
Storyteller Owl. Accuracy and agreement with teacher assessment for
their evaluation will be scored for post-assessment along with recorded
number of students working at levels 3 or 4 to indicate student progress.

D. Nine-week Requirement:
This unit occurs during the third quarter of the 1995-96 school
year. Students are seen twice a week during this time frame which is
equivalent to one semester of traditionally scheduled art classes. An
interim unit of Native American Rock Art (5 art session of the available
18 sessions) will coincide with the ceramic unit as ceramic pieces are
fired and all students have completed their artwork.

III. DOCUMENTATION
A. Progress - Narrative

In this unit it is not possible for students to create an example
of work for pre-assessment. Students will be striving toward a pre-defined
performance standard (rubric) that would contain the criteria for the
traditional artform. This not only measures the students understanding
for the underlying applications, but allows for individualistic differences
through students interpretation (synthesis) of this artform. The
pre-assessment consisted of a five-question knowledge quiz and sample pinch
pot. Seventy-five percent performed at mastery level. With the high
mastery rate a post test quiz was not given. Sixty-three percent rated
above level 3 on pinch pot pre-assessment.

In order to meet the criteria of the final two-part assessments,
students needed to fully understand and apply the vocabulary, concepts and
processes of ceramic clay techniques and use the unique Pueblo design
qualities as seen on artifacts, in design game and all resources pertaining
to this unit. Students evaluated a variety of finished artworks for their
achievement levels using the same generic rubric to evaluate their own work
as compared to rating assigned by the teacher.

In general, students showed an increased awareness and concern for
the quality of their artwork. Requests for feedback and correction were
made often by the majority of students. Justifications were made for the
inclusion of innovative deviations from the original, such as "This is a
"devilish owl.", when creating longer than necessary horns or "I have
painted a feather design like on the pot I saw".

Students were consistent in their evaluation of sample artwork that
was either of a high or low level. More disagreement occurred in the
mid-range (level 2 & 3). Less objective evaluation occurred of their own
work. More students (76%) tended to rate their work higher or the same as
that of the assigned rating of the teacher. Although the two students
doing the lowest quality work did rate themselves accurately.

Range of scores for Pinch pot rubric levels

Number of students scoring Level 4 - 8 Percentage - 36%
Level 3 - 6 27%
Level 2 - 5 23%
Level 1 - 0 0%
Level 0 - 3 14%
TOTAL 22 100%

Range of score for Storyteller Owl rubric levels

Number of students scoring Level 4 - 6 Percentage - 28%

Level 3 - 6 27%
Level 2 - 8 36%
Level 1 - 2 9%
Level 0 - 0 0%
TOTAL 22 100%

Comparison of rating between student and teacher (17 respondents)
Same as teacher 7 students - 41%
Higher than teacher 6 students - 35%
Lower than teacher 4 students - 24%
Data not available 5 students - N/A

IV. ANALYSIS

A. Strengths/Changes

This type of assessment instrument created motivation to improve
the concern for quality. Students were very focused on their own, good
craftsmanship and were careful observers. Students could easily tell
excellent quality from very poor quality and had some difficulty
distinguishing in the mid-range. This is also true for the teacher. When
several factors must be considered in the total presentation. The
construction may be excellent, but the decoration may be mediocre. A
dilemma then occurs as how to score. The use of the rubric assisted to
some degree.

I would put additional emphasis on the decoration aspect, as this
seems to have been a factor for an otherwise excellent project dropping in
quality to became above-average or average. A rating system for
decoration could be developed for sample design criteria, which would also
allow for additional practice in using the rating system. more consistency
among scored might occur.

B. Limitations

Due to time and material constraints the effects of practice are
limited. Also the delays in having all students to a completion phase,
prepared for the next step, was difficult and drawn out. This accounted
for the interim project on Native American Rock Art. This did encourage
some decoration and symbol making. The twice a week schedule was
beneficial, but the high absenteeism made getting all students finished
together difficult.

D. Summary of Teaching Strategies & Student Learning

This unit included various resources and activities to capture the
interest of students regarding native American art forms. This unit was
chosen for its curriculum tie with the fourth grade Social Studies
curriculum, which includes the study of Native Americans of the Southwest.
Demonstrations, audio/visual materials, game formats, use of art materials
and cooperative activities were planned to meet many different learning
styles and avenues that the study of art can employ. E.E.I. techniques
were used to increase the likely success rate. With fifty-five percent of
these students earning a rating of three or above on their final project,
this indicates an above average rate of success.

Rubric: Pinch pot

Level 4 Pinch pot is round with smooth (not dimpled) surface texture. The
wall of the pot is thin consistently all over. There are not cracks of
holes on the surface.

Level 3 Pinch pot is round, but may have one or two places that are
inconsistent. The surface is smooth with little dimpling, could have fine
cracks, but no holes. The wall of the pot is mostly thin all over, but few
areas may be somewhat thin or thick.

Level 2 Pinch pot is somewhat round, but lopsided. The surface is mostly
smooth, but several areas have cracks or holes. The wall of the pot is too
thick or too thin, but is consistent all over the pot.

Level 1 Pinch pot is vaguely round, perhaps has flat, almost square sides.
The surface maybe smooth or very dimpled with many impressions of fingers.
The walls of the pot are inconsistent all over, with some areas
(particularly the top lip of the pot) are "paper-thin" while other areas
(particularly the bottom) are extremely thick.

Level 0 No effort/No project.

RUBRIC: Zuni Storyteller Owl

Level 4: Construction - Owl is well-crafted, with smooth, undimpled,
rounded or egg-shaped body that has been slip joined and visible evidence
of seam is not existent or slight and owl sits flatly. Additions (wings,
tail, beak, horns, and eyes) are securely attached. Decoration - (paint or
glaze) has been applied evenly and flatly (unmodulated) to create clearly
defined patterns or designs that are appropriate to the artform (no hearts,
ying-yang signs, etc.). A balance of decorated and non-decorated areas is
achieved.

Level 3 Construction - Owl is well-crafted, with almost smooth surface,
some dimpling, rounded or egg-shaped body that has been slip joined and
visible evidence of seam is seem but does not detract from the overall
appearance or positioning. Additions (wings, tail, beak, horns, and eyes)
are securely attached. Decoration - (paint or glaze) has been applied
evenly and flatly (unmodulated) to create clearly defined patterns or
designs that are appropriate to the artform (no hearts, ying-yang signs,
etc.). There is either too much or too little decorative patterns and
designs.

Level 2 Construction - Owl is fairly-crafted, with large areas of dimpling
and/or fine to shallow cracking. The body that has been slip joined and
visible evidence of seam is seems to detract from the overall appearance or
the overall shape is lopsided and does not sit flat. Additions (wings,
tail, beak, horns, and eyes) are attached but the surface not blended to
secure or improve appearance. Decoration - (paint or glaze) has been
applied unevenly and splotchy, and patterns or designs are haphazardly
placed or incomplete Designs may be inappropriate to the artform ( hearts,
ying-yang signs, smilies, words or letters, etc.). There is either too
much or too little decorative patterns and designs.

Level 1 Construction - Owl is poorly-crafted, with most areas of dimpled
and having shallow to large cracks and holes. The body that has been
poorly joined or separations or gaps between surfaces of seam is evident
The overall shape is lopsided and does not sit flat. Additions (wings,
tail, beak, horns, and eyes) are missing or not attached properly to the
surface. Decoration - (paint or glaze) has been applied unevenly and
splotchy, and patterns or designs are haphazardly placed or incomplete
Designs may be inappropriate to the artform ( hearts, ying-yang signs,
smilies, words or letters, etc.). There no decorative patterns or designs
(painted solid) or not decorated at all.

Level 0 Clay project submitted is not in the style of a Zuni Storyteller
Owl or is of another animal form. In addition, no effort or no project
submitted.

On 9/28, Ann Wilschke wrote,

> I like your grading ideas. I have my eighth graders write
>self-evaluations of their major projects. Explaining their process and
>learning. I feel that the learning is what should be graded, not the
>final product.
> I would be interested in seeing a specific rubric, say for a clay
>project of a lino printing unit.
> Thanks.
> Ann Wilschke


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