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Lesson Plans


CHILDREN WORKING WITH WOOD

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Bob Greaves (Robert.Greaves.au)
Mon, 15 Sep 1997 13:15:25 +0000

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Thought some of you may be interested in this as it is the handout i
am going to use this year.
Bob.

This activity, presented by Monash University Faculty of Education with support from the
RAS, Mitre 10 and Portas, is in its 12th year at the Royal Melbourne Show.
During that time it has provided unique creative experiences for thousands of children.
The concept was first developed to provide children with the opportunity to explore the
basic human activity of construction. Initially conceived as an ART activity it now
fulfilsmany of the objectives of TECHNOLOGY STUDIES.
The activity is open ended, allowing children to make their own decisions about what
to make, with the teachers providingtechnical and mechanical support.
The material are graded to cater for the development levels of children of varying ages.
Pre kindergarten children enjoy the action of hammering into pine cut
across the grain, allowing the nails to be hammered in reasonable
easily.
Kindergarten and Prep aged children who have reached the stage of
drawing named objects,can take the process further making recognisable
objects by adding thin pieces of ply and canite.
Primary aged children have access to a wider range of timber including circles cut from
pine logs and dowel. The circles and dowel often provide the motivation to make
wheeled vehicles. We think that for many children the making of these "cars" means
that this is the first time they can make something for themselves which has moving
parts.
Most children will make three dimensional representations of their world; furniture,
animals, vehicles while some surprise us with the unique nature of their constructions.
We encourage the children to make objects which are their own ideas and are not
adult concepts. Children gain pride in making their own creation and with adult
acceptance, are encouraged to develop their ideas further.

Bob Greaves Faculty of Education Peninsula Campus 99044281.

Bob Greaves.


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