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Lesson Plans


special needs

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Joanne L Vanbezooyen (vanbezoo)
Sat, 28 Sep 1996 15:18:43 -0700 (MST)


Kathleen Black

Your question regarding the use of candy for a reward for behavior of a
special education student is a sensitive one. I think the real issue in
your example, was the teacher aide's verbal reprimand. Threats should not
be used to motivate, obviously. It is especially important to understand
each students special problems, needs, and personality, and family. Only
then can you make the decision as to the best way to motivate and reward a
child. I used a peppermint to motivate an autistic child to listen and
participate during Spanish lessons (first grade). It was exceedingly
difficult for him to interact in groups...too hard to try, at that age.
But if he could see me holding the peppermint, (with a smile and nod of
encouragement) he did a wonderful job. Somedays he just couldn't. Fourth
grade boys with LD problems needed incentive to write, because it was too
hard to make the mental to hand to paper connections. Their incentive was
foor them to write a sentence without stopping, I would write the next
one.. One emotionally handicapped 6th grader was bright and learning was
not the problem. His family background had created emotional problems
that he could not control. Some days he was okay, other days he'd flare
up and we'd have to take him home for a few days (foster home). The big
question here was whether he was disrupting the learning of the rest in
the classroom to the point he should not be in class! This is a real
issue .
Can the rest of the students understand one child getting a treat for a behavior and them not? Yes. If you talk to them and explain that
sometimes a person has a difficult time with ?(Spanish) and the peppermint
really helps. JWhen other children have an especially hard time, then we
willl help them, too with a sticker or chart or whatever.