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Lesson Plans


Re: rudiments

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Walter Carl Holland (wholland)
Fri, 20 Sep 1996 21:11:12 -0500 (CDT)


As I see it rudiment(elements and principles) are rules that are taught
only so that we can find that unique person who can step across the line
and come to a new conclusion or if you think of it as a collision of the
past with the future.

If you train on something for as long as we choose to in our and our
students lifes you have the good fortue to see change and that is art.

On Fri, 20 Sep 1996, MARK JOYCE wrote:

> As I'm working on the development of a new course in Applied Arts
> (Materials Exploration and Management) for Teachers...
>
> I find myself reflecting on how, in music, rudiments like scales, arpeggios,
> and interval training are introduced from the beginning and continue to
> be practiced and developed for a lifetime. While these rudiments are
> a constant, they are a means not an end. We will never hear them
> performed in concert or at a recital, no matter how well they've been
> been mastered. Parallel examples can be found in dance and athletics.
>
> What might be the counterpart(s) in art? Are there rudiments unique
> to all forms of visual expression. Are they introduced early and
> practiced continually to facilitate fluency of expression?
>
> Are there rudiments that are unique to each of the traditional art
> mediums and processes of drawing, painting, printmaking and
> sculpting? Are they introduced early and practiced continually
> to facilitate fluency of expression?
>
> Are there rudiments that are unique to traditional craft mediums and
> processes involving clay, handmade paper, and fibers (basketry or
> weaving)? Are they introduced early and practiced continually to
> facilitate fluency of expression and production?
>
> The question can be applied to both students whose only studio
> encounters are with school-based studio projects as well as those
> whose studio experiences come through recreational programs or
> perhaps even private lessons.
>
> Beginning (group or private) music students have weekly assignments
> which include some rudiments, theory, work on a variety of pieces for
> a variety of learning purposes and focused work on a particular piece
> (or pieces) in preparation for an annual or semi-annual recital. What
> is the comparable breadth of structured, intentional preparation and
> study for elementary age students (school-based or private) which
> might (should?) precede the annual or semi-annual exhibition of several
> selected works?
>
> I'm thinking that there's a whole discipline of practice (a pedagogy?)
> that might be missing here...what do you think?
>
> Mark Joyce joycem Concordia College Ann Arbor, MI
>