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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2010

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From: Jean Snow (4nutmeg_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Sep 17 2010 - 11:00:56 PDT


What's the "ABC kinder curriculum"? Jean Snow

On Fri, Sep 17, 2010 at 12:01 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
>
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, September 16, 2010.
>
> 1. Re: Grade 6 Art
> 2. Re: 6th grade art -drawing
> 3. artsonia- student statements?
> 4. RE: artsonia- student statements?
> 5. Teaching Elementary Kids
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Grade 6 Art
> From: Peggy Woolsey <eoolspeg@nbnet.nb.ca>
> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2010 08:28:49 +0000
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Norval Morriseau rocks!
>
> On 15-Sep-10, at 2:20 AM, lesamm@exhibit905.info wrote:
>
> >
> > I have a few suggestions for you to try, if you haven't already. Every
> > class is different of course. This is what I have learned from my
> > grade
> > 6s;
> >
> > - keep the art assignments simple to do in one class, 1 hour, maybe
> > in two
> > classes if you are lucky they will stick too a two class assignment.
> > - Grade 6s still like to color. Gear drawing and painting
> > assignments to
> > this ability. I have success with this when I limit the color choice
> > to 3.
> > Give color or line or texture choice purpose.
> >
> > For instance, I work with Native kids (100%), I focused colors and
> > content
> > on the first assignments on the medicine wheel and spirit keeper
> > animals,
> > and took it abit further by introducing x-ray drawings/paintings by a
> > First Nation artist, Norval Morriseau. First, I introduced students
> > to the
> > artist, explained and demonstrated x-ray drawings. Then I provided
> > print
> > outs with outlines of the spirit keeper animals to each student.
> > Students
> > then had to do their own thing. They were limited to using the
> > medicine
> > wheel colors, 4 colors. Coloring, drawing, line, solid, gradations,
> > were
> > all up to their imagination.
> >
> > The next assignment was similar but introduced them to Joan Miro and
> > his
> > simple abstractions. Using similar colors, as it happens. Students
> > were
> > asked to make loop-de-loops on paper and trace the line with a
> > heavier or
> > rougher line. Then color in solids using 4 colors. I talked about
> > balancing colors in the composition. Its working. Although this is a
> > longer assignment and I am loosing some student's attention. A few
> > still
> > bring it out to work on as a filler. And, its interesting to see the
> > line
> > work and color choices students make.
> >
> > I am teaching gr.6 this year for the first time and so far it is going
> > really well.
> >
> > I hope this helps.
> > Lesa.
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: 6th grade art -drawing
> From: "KulasFamily" <makul9@gra.midco.net>
> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2010 06:21:14 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> I also have had good experiences teaching contour drawing to younger
> students (even 3rd) - I think keeping the drawings to just a few minutes
> each and not too many in one sitting is key here. They are our warm-up
> exercises. We transition to a drawing done without the "blinder" - often
> with water-soluble pencils... Those few minutes spent concentrating on the
> contours  really improve these drawings.
> Mary in Northern MN
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "dulcius"
>
> Sent: Tuesday, September 14, 2010 6:06 PM
> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] 6th grade art
>
>
> > Jeane,
> > I do blind and modified contour drawings with my 6th graders every year,
> > and I have had a lot of success with it.  It's the cornerstone of a lot
> > of what I teach them afterwards.  I tell them we're going to "PRETEND"
> > (I say it in a very corny, Barney-type way) which they think is kind of
> > funny - I tell them we are going to PRETEND there's an ant  - and this
> > ant is VERY slow, and cannot fly or jump.  It also can only walk on
> > EDGES of something (and we talk about what edges/contours are - focusing
> > on how they're NOT the exact same thing as "outlines", since outlines
> > mostly don't exist in the real world).
> >
> > We also get into the "right/left brain" stuff, which I find really
> > useful in helping them think in a new way (I think they enjoy the notion
> > of "tricking" their "bossy, know-it-all" left brain into "butting out
> > for a bit").  I emphasize how everything has an infinite number of sets
> > of contours, depending on how you view the object, and tell them how
> > important it is to keep both the object they're drawing and their head
> > still while doing the exercise.
> >
> > I do have pencils with a piece of card stock attached, but I tell them
> > that's just a reminder, since I know they're all smart enough to figure
> > out how to look under it. It's just there if they accidentally look back
> > at their paper.  Then, I have them tape their paper to the table,
> > position their pencil on it, then turn on their chair in the direct
> > opposite direction to where their paper is to look at the thing they're
> > going to draw (they draw first their hand holding a pair of scissors,
> > then their hand holding a small plastic animal).
> >
> > I tell them to put their "ant" down on an edge, and that their pencil
> > and eye can ONLY go where the ant goes - if the ant gets to a "dead
> > end" contour, it can't jump or fly to another one - it has to go back
> > the way it came to get to a new "road".  I give them 4 minutes the
> > first time out - and I tell them they're not allowed to stop until the
> > timer rings. After the first blind contour, as soon as they look at the
> > drawings, they're all laughing and enjoying how "crazy" they look!  I
> > tell them it's not really a drawing of a hand with scissors, but
> > instead it's a record of the journey of the ant!  Then they do a second
> > blind contour (which goes a bit longer), and after that, a modified
> > contour, in which they're allowed to look at their paper, but only for
> > 2 seconds at a time; all the other rules are the same.
> >
> >
> > Sorry this is so long, but I do think this is a really important piece
> > of the puzzle for them at this age - they so want to know how to "make
> > things look right", and after two blind contour drawings, they are
> > nearly all impressed with how their modifed contour drawing turns out -
> > much more realistic than they thought they could do!  Here are a couple
> > of projects my 6th grade students do after having done this exercise - I
> > really do build on those contour skills:
> > http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=214015 ,
> > http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=223919 ,
> > http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=249904
> > Good luck!
> > -Lydia in Toledo
> > Toledo School for the Arts
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: artsonia- student statements?
> From: jeryl HOLLINGSWORTH <hollingsworth005@bellsouth.net>
> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2010 16:02:30 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Hi all,
>   I hope everyone is off to a great start. I'm gearing up with Artsonia again
> as we finish work that could be published, and one of my students is in the
> running for Artist of the Week- Zaine7 in the 4th -6th grade age group. His work
> is a gesture drawing study which we do as the beginning of a long unit on human
> form that ends with sculptures to go along with their history unit. I'm sure he
> would appreciate your vote each day from now until Sat.  On another note, this
> year Artsonia is adding a student statement component. The parents log on and
> the students post their comments or the teacher can post. Teachers have an
> option to block it and only let them do it at school. I'd like your thoughts on
> blocking or not. At first I thought it would be good to get parents involved,
> but the couple of comments that have been posted clearly showed the parents
> didn't get the idea  (example:I love you honey, good job- your mama) The
> artsonia folks put an explanation of the artist statement that you could adjust
> if you want. I have tried now to make it easier to understand for parents. I may
> wait a bit and if doesn't work out, I'll block it and try to do it at school.
> What are all of you doing?
>
>           thanks,
>                Jeryl
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: artsonia- student statements?
> From: Cheryl Lloyd <clloyd@ceres.k12.ca.us>
> Date: Wed, 15 Sep 2010 19:16:09 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Hi Jeryl,
> I have experienced the same issue with parents writing comments in artist statement section, although without any prompting from me, some kids went on and wrote artist statements which I thought was really cool.  I actually emailed Artsonia to see if I could log on my students at school to write their statements at school and I was told that there isn't a way to do that at this time.  I would have to give them my login and password, which I am not going to do.  I suggested that they make a student login code like they do for teachers.  Maybe if more of us ask for it, they will make that happen for us.
>
> In the meantime, I have made a worksheet where students type in the answers in my digital art class and I plan to copy and paste the statements myself.   I haven't done it yet...in my plans for next week.
>
> PS. Still loving your ABC kinder curriculum!  You should sell it!
>
> Cheri Lloyd
> Ceres, CA
> ________________________________________
> From: jeryl HOLLINGSWORTH
> Sent: Wednesday, September 15, 2010 4:02 PM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] artsonia- student statements?
>
> Hi all,
>   I hope everyone is off to a great start. I'm gearing up with Artsonia again
> as we finish work that could be published, and one of my students is in the
> running for Artist of the Week- Zaine7 in the 4th -6th grade age group. His work
> is a gesture drawing study which we do as the beginning of a long unit on human
> form that ends with sculptures to go along with their history unit. I'm sure he
> would appreciate your vote each day from now until Sat.  On another note, this
> year Artsonia is adding a student statement component. The parents log on and
> the students post their comments or the teacher can post. Teachers have an
> option to block it and only let them do it at school. I'd like your thoughts on
> blocking or not. At first I thought it would be good to get parents involved,
> but the couple of comments that have been posted clearly showed the parents
> didn't get the idea  (example:I love you honey, good job- your mama) The
> artsonia folks put an explanation of the artist statement that you could adjust
> if you want. I have tried now to make it easier to understand for parents. I may
> wait a bit and if doesn't work out, I'll block it and try to do it at school.
> What are all of you doing?
>
>           thanks,
>                Jeryl
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Teaching Elementary Kids
> From:  <joe3cox@cox.net>
> Date: Thu, 16 Sep 2010 20:33:38 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Hello everyone,
> One thing about being and artist and teacher is always being thrown a creative challenge.  I teach high school art and ceramic during the day.  Now I have been offered an opportunity to teach ceramic to 8 to 13 year olds at a our local art center.  I get some extra cash plus the use of the facilities for my own work.  We just had our first class and whoa, was I in for a shock.  I am definitely  out of my comfort zone.
>
> I have 10 great students who meet for a 2 hour class after school.  I have three boys who are very energetic and like to talk very loudly, pound the clay with their fist and play.  How are some good ways to get them to focus and calm down a bit.  I realize it is after school and  they are energized but I still need some order in managing the class.  Should I set them together  or will this just lead to more play.
>
> I kid had to pay to take the class so they want to be in the class.  So any suggestions to help me out would be greatly appreciated.
>
> Blessing,
> Joe
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
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