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[teacherartexchange] Help fo developmentally disabled students in Digital Art

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From: Claire d'Anthes (cdanthes_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Sep 10 2010 - 22:06:42 PDT


Hi, all,
I'm hoping that one of you will have some suggestions in this arena. I
have worked successfully for many years in my drawing, printmaking,
digital art, and painting classes with all types of Special Education
students. This is the first year that Developmentally Disabled
students have been assigned to my Digital Art Class and we are really
struggling. Students are supposed to have basic computer skills to
take the class. I use an online tutorial and large screen
demonstratons/presentations to teach tools. We learn a few tools and
then I teach an art project that uses these tools and some art
concepts.

So far, the DD students and/or their aides cannot follow along with the
whole group instruction of tools, even though everyone is paired and I
stop after each short segment to repeat or rephrase and then go around
to help partners where neither person has understood. The more
competent students in the class are very helpful to all the other
students as well. After 3 weeks, 90% of my other students have
finished their first tutorials and projects with excellent results and
are ready to move on. Those who haven't finished are meticulous, have
been absent, or are just now realizing that they really do need to pay
attention. My DD students and their aides have not mastered step 1 of
using the selection tools, despite repeated one on one assistance from
me or an advanced student. I'm walking them through just finding their
files every day.

Photoshop is challenging and it's already difficult to make half the
class wait while I help those who are novices or not good with oral
directions or who just don't listen. Normally this improves as
students get the hang of things and realize that I am actually going to
check their daily tutorial work. However, this year, the first week
the majority of the class was having to wait 20 minutes for me to try
to get the 3 or 4 S.E. students and their aides even logged on. I have
have had some of these students before and one of them, especially, is
a wonderful student. I would like for them to be included in the
class, but I can't sacrifice everyone else on the altar.

Currently I have requests in for a few copies of a simple text that
teaches tools in one page so that the aides can proceed with the
students at their own pace with me helping at a normal rate, However,
one of the aides does not seem at all interested in learning, does not
use the written instructions I have provided to help her and her
student catch up, and just wants me or someone else to take over. I've
asked for student tech mentors who could provide one-on-one assistance,
etc. Everyone's is very enthusiastic but I don't know if any of these
things will actually materialize and in the meantime my DD students and
I are having a really hard time.

Has anyone had this situation? What did you do? Were you able to
teach Photoshop to this level of student in a class of 35? Do you
think I could do it with a one on one student mentor? I do want the
students to actually learn something that they can repeat. Or, do you
know of a simpler, more intuitive program that I could get for these
students. I could adapt the at level art projects to the program. Most
of the students can learn the basic tools with much repetition but do
not have the manual control to manipulate the pen tool, etc. Two of
the students are having great difficulty remembering
directions/sequences involving more than 1 step and cannot read well
enough for written directions. My goal would be for them to
master/remember some basic tools through repetition and be able to
create some artworks and design documents that they would be proud of.

On Sep 9, 2010, at 12:00 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
wrote:

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, September 08, 2010.
>
> 1. Tempera Paints
> 2. Working with 7th/8th Grade Students
> 3. Re: Roy G. Biv
> 4. Critique Please:
> 5. Forgot the link to the painting
> 6. Re:Roy G. Biv
> 7. Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 07, 2010
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Tempera Paints
> From: "Mark Paradise" <MParadise@ewindsor.k12.ct.us>
> Date: Wed, 08 Sep 2010 08:00:43 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Hi Everyone,
> Jim was asking about some recommendations for tempera paints. In my
> 30+ years of teaching, I've tried them all. Some settle out quickly,
> go moldy, or have weak color. The best brand I've used and stayed with
> is Crayola Premier tempera. You can't beat them for the price. Most
> art supply companies sell them.
> Good luck,
> Mark
>
> NOTICE:
> This e-mail is intended solely for the use of the individual to whom
> it is addressed and may contain information that is privileged,
> confidential or otherwise exempt from disclosure. If the reader of
> this e-mail is not the intended recipient or the employee or agent
> responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you
> are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying
> of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received
> this communication in error, please immediately notify us by replying
> to the original message at the listed email address. Thank You.
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Working with 7th/8th Grade Students
> From: "Mark Paradise" <MParadise@ewindsor.k12.ct.us>
> Date: Wed, 08 Sep 2010 08:16:18 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Good Morning,
> This is in response to Jim's note about working w/ 7th & 8th grade art
> students...
> Your idea about having 2 different art activities is a good one. I
> also teach that level. Have been for over 30 years. Try to develop
> lessons that allow for personal choices and expression. You have to
> grab their attention with lessons that can have meaning to them. I am
> researching artists/styles and movements all the time. Make art come
> alive for them and it will be an easier time for you.
> I do a multitude of topics that cover all types of painting, drawing,
> sculpture, ceramics, printmaking etc. I try to coordinate units using
> media, the elements and principles of art/design in each along with a
> few different representative artists.
> You need to connect art to them in some way. Make it personal for them.
>
> If you'd like, I would be happy to share some of my ideas with you
> down the road. If you wish, you can send me some of your unit ideas
> and we can hash a few things out.
>
> Just so you know, I have periods that are 72 minutes long, so I
> understand the need to "keep them on task".
>
> It will also help you a great deal if you personally express yourself
> within each unit. Show your personal interest...that may help too.
> Showing your energy with your students can make a difference.
>
> I am from the old school and have based my teaching on the simple fact
> that my students can always do better. With that in mind, you need to
> foster their work ethic in art. Students come to me everyday with
> their work and tell me they are "done". I have to be ready to
> conference with each of them and offer individual help and ideas in
> order to help them make their work better. I always try to give them a
> number of options...Don't give them the "right" answer. There are
> always so many different approaches to a problem.
>
> This will help make them independent learners. I often send students
> back to the "drawing table" many times, but I never do their work for
> them. Nor do I draw or work on their assignments!
>
> I can also recommend a number of books for you to order that will
> spark your own creativity as an art teacher. That is important! You
> need to apply as much creativity to your teaching as you would in your
> own art work.
>
> Finally, don't be afraid to talk with their other subject teachers.
> You will find many avenues for art units simply based upon what other
> teachers are teaching...talk to the LA teachers, science, Spanish and
> social study teachers. There are always connections....Good Luck,
> Mark
>
> NOTICE:
> This e-mail is intended solely for the use of the individual to whom
> it is addressed and may contain information that is privileged,
> confidential or otherwise exempt from disclosure. If the reader of
> this e-mail is not the intended recipient or the employee or agent
> responsible for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you
> are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution, or copying
> of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received
> this communication in error, please immediately notify us by replying
> to the original message at the listed email address. Thank You.
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Roy G. Biv
> From: "julie t." <jatcagirl7@roadrunner.com>
> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 2010 05:55:03 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> first time i've heard it...and loved the roy g. biv song, but what do
> you do with the "indigo" in the song when teaching color theory in
> the classroom?
>
> :-) julie t., southern california
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Critique Please:
> From: Woody Duncan <WOODYDUNCAN@COMCAST.NET>
> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 2010 10:17:22 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Critique Please: After looking at the photo of my painting of "Young
> Artist", I want to darken the background behind
> the head and the white bib. Can you give me any other suggestions,
> comments, whatever - or, do I just move on
> to another painting ?
> Thanks, Woody
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> Join me as a friend on facebook:
> http://www.facebook.com/woody.duncan1?ref=name
>
> Read My 2010 September Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog10/September.html
>
> Read My 2010 August Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog10/August.html
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Forgot the link to the painting
> From: Woody Duncan <WOODYDUNCAN@COMCAST.NET>
> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 2010 10:19:53 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> Critique Please: After looking at the photo of my painting of "Young
> Artist", I want to darken the background behind
> the head and the white bib. Can you give me any other suggestions,
> comments, whatever - or, do I just move on
> to another painting ?
> Thanks, Woody
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog10/YoungArtist08.jpg
>
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> Join me as a friend on facebook:
> http://www.facebook.com/woody.duncan1?ref=name
>
> Read My 2010 September Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog10/September.html
>
> Read My 2010 August Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog10/August.html
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re:Roy G. Biv
> From: "marder621@rcn.com" <marder621@rcn.com>
> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 2010 12:45:11 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> Nopt a problem-I show them the spectrum-scientific light waves-and say
> indigo is there and we will not us eit for our projects-then I cross
> off
> the i in Roy's name on my white board.
>
> Original Message:
> -----------------
> From: julie t. jatcagirl7@roadrunner.com
> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 2010 05:55:03 -0700
> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
> Subject: Re:[teacherartexchange] Roy G. Biv
>
>
> first time i've heard it...and loved the roy g. biv song, but what do
> you do with the "indigo" in the song when teaching color theory in
> the classroom?
>
> :-) julie t., southern california
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
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> mail2web - Check your email from the web at
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>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 07, 2010
> From: tara franzese <artmuse67@gmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 8 Sep 2010 21:04:20 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> Hi All,
>
> Hope the new school year is finding you all well so far!
>
> I have a great cause I wanted to post a link for on the server. It's
> called Fortunato's smile and is an organization that employs disabled
> adults with the opportunity to create greeting cards. The
> organization was inspired by the founder's sister who has down's
> syndrome (as you will find all this out in the video when you look at
> the link.) The pledging ends on September 12th, and they only need
> about 400 more dollars to reach their goal. Check it our and spread
> the word if you have time!!
>
> http://kck.st/9Llwv6
>
> Best Regards
> -Tara
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
> cdanthes@verizon.net
> leave-708741
> -65505.57b35ccfeb76b13960e04d32e2e2a040@lists.pub.getty.edu
>

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