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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 01, 2010

---------

From: Sue Ossanna (sueossanna_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Sep 02 2010 - 16:38:31 PDT


Re: Art Unit Plans in Backwards Design Format

I teach K-5 art and it is my second year. With no training in Backwards
Design, my principals want me to turn in my unit plans in this format. The
other 4 teachers in my district cannot help me, because they were not asked
to use this format. Does anyone have a template that can perhaps get me
started, as they want the plans this year!

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Thursday, September 02, 2010 3:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 01, 2010

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, September 01, 2010.

1. Re: sketchbooks
2. RE: sketchbooks
3. RE: sketchbooks
4. RE: sketchbooks
5. RE: sketchbooks
6. Getting the Guys Interested in Journaling ??
7. Please vote for my Limeades for Learning project
8. RE: sketchbooks
9. Re: Getting the Guys Interested in Journaling ??
10. Re: skecthbooks
11. Re: Getting the Guys Interested in Journaling ??
12. china marker ideas?
13. Themes/ Unit/ Resource Ideas
14. sketchbooks
15. RE: Themes/ Unit/ Resource Ideas

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: sketchbooks
From: Christina Papageorgiou <papageorgiouchristina@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 10:17:27 +0300
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello Fran,
I am not sure if I can help you but I will try to share with you my
past experience.
Living and working in Athens, I had to make my own sketch books as for
many years there weren't any in the market to buy. It is only the last
5-10 years that one can find decent sketchbooks at decent prices.
What I will describe here is more of the artistic sketchbook /
portfolio, that usually comes in A0 or A1 or A2 sizes, made by thick
papers and has a rough hand made binding in one side.Front and back
cover are not essential to this but you can add it using harder paper
So, first think is to decide what kind of work your students will be
doing. Sketching, aquarelles, working with coloured inks, oil pastels,
dry pastels, pensils, charcoals, what?
Once you decide this, then a visit to a wholesale shop that deals only
with paper. In Greece there are many shops like this and if you need a
large quantity then it is best if you go directly to a paper factory.
There is no doubt, you can do this via internet, but I usually prefer
to take a visit and see the variety of materials they have, instead of
choosing through a catalogue via the internet. This way I always get
new ideas!
Following you decide about the size and you ask them to cut it. All
factories have special facilities for cutting. Ask them also to give
you the left overs from cutting. In Greece paper comes in large sizes
so when you cut it there are always left overs. These can be very
handy for collage, quick exercises, and many other uses. I always find
it very handy and in Greece they give it for free sometimes.
Binding with sewing is my favourite. You can ask your students to make
large holes with a perforate or with a bodkin, and by using thick
needles they can sew the pages together either using plastic strings,
or waxed leather strings or whatever they can think, that is strong
enough to support the sketch book. Keep in mind that binding together
the pages will use some 2 - 5 cm for the side of the paper, so don't
forget to add this area to the total size of your page. This way you
will get the actual working area in the exact dimensions that you
wish. Some shops / factories have the possibility to insert a slight
cutting at the side to the paper so that you can detach it easily.
I hope that this will be of some assistance to you.
Kind regards
papageorgiouchristina@gmail.com

On Wed, Sep 1, 2010 at 4:59 AM, Fran Legman <fran.legman@gmail.com> wrote:
> I would like my third through fifth grade classes this year to make their
own sketchbooks.  Does anyone have a suggestion for a good way to make them?
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: sketchbooks
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 08:08:15 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Fran
Over the years I have made sketchbooks with my students. That said, I taught
high school, and the sewing books, with many signatures, then sewn together
was hard for them, so I can't imagine doing that with your grade level. I
would suggest an easier type of sketchbook. Here is an easier one we also
did.

You "tear" (looks like a deckle edge when you are finished) sheets of paper
(but you can also stack precut paper) into a pile of 25 pieces. We used 25
because a) I didn't expect to get any more than that in terms of sketches
and b) binding technique, while very easy doesn't accomodate more than that.
You then have chipboard covers the same size (one for top, and one for
bottom). So you now have a stack of chipboard, pages, chipboard. Remove the
chipboard from the stack temporarily, and score the side that you plan to
bind, 1.5 inches away, from top to bottom, using a pair of scissors opened
up as your scoring tool, and a ruler. So you now have a line, from top to
bottom, that is cut partially through the chipboard. Bend the chipboard on
the line (opposite of the cut), so that it looks like a door, same for the
back piece but bend it the "other way". Now take a hole puncher and punch
all the sheets of paper, AND the chip board covers in the same place, so
that you only have two holes along the side. We, then took duck tape in
different colors and overlapping the tape slightly "covered" the chipboard
edge with the holes, 2" wide, thus reinforcing the bend in the cardboard.
You have to then poke the holes back out with the point of a compass. You
then restack everything, and get those brass fasteners at staples with the
large "tails" and put it through the holes. To decorate the covers, we used
this as an opportunity to teach about positive and negative space, and had
our students design foam rubber stamps (2- one positive, one negative),
using the thin sheets of foam that they cut with scissors and glued down
onto cardboard, and they stamped their repetitive design in a checkerboard
fashion on a piece of paper, and glued that one top of their sketchbook
covers.

San D

> Subject: [teacherartexchange] sketchbooks
> From: fran.legman@gmail.com
> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2010 21:59:59 -0400
> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
> I would like my third through fifth grade classes this year to make their
own sketchbooks. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good way to make them?
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: sketchbooks
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ellen.sears@anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 11:42:36 +0000
X-Message-Number: 3

I love using 2-ply cardboard (cereal/cracker boxes) for book covers -
Check this out - but I would probably use a pamphlet stitch with the
students -
http://thelongthread.com/?p=3750

pamphlet stitch:
http://www.booklyn.org/education/ispamphlet.pdf

more:
http://straightlinesout.blogspot.com/2009/11/pamphlet-stitch-journal-tutoria
l.html

Need something even easier? Try this one, but use a pencil through the
holes:
http://www.education.com/activity/article/sketchbook/

Ellen

> I would like my third through fifth grade classes this year to make their
own sketchbooks. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good way to make them?
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: sketchbooks
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ellen.sears@anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 11:45:32 +0000
X-Message-Number: 4
Sorry - had to add one more - how cute is this?
http://s274195340.onlinehome.us/__oneclick_uploads/2010/02/minicerealboxbook
.pdf
ellen
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] sketchbooks
> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2010 21:59:59 -0400
> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
> 
> I would like my third through fifth grade classes this year to make their
own sketchbooks. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good way to make them?
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>  		 	   		  
---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: sketchbooks
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 12:21:32 +0000
X-Message-Number: 5
Good Morning
 I love all of your examples Ellen. Thanks for doing the legwork on them.
 
  San D
  		 	   		  
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Getting the Guys Interested in Journaling ??
From: BigCrab99@aol.com
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 08:28:46 EDT
X-Message-Number: 6
School begins for me on Tuesday after Labor  Day!  I am planning to do 
sketchbook journals with eighth graders.  I  have found many cool
journalilng 
ideas online and on You Tube, but I am need a  few ideas that will really 
"grab" the boys in my class.  I plan to give a  variety of ideas/lessons
from 
which they can choose, and I want to include  several that will really
relate 
to the boys.  
Carolyn in Virginia Beach (watching Earl!!)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Please vote for my Limeades for Learning project
From: Tina Vercelli <tvercelli@ardmore.k12.ok.us>
Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2010 08:40:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7
Sonic and DonorsChoose.org have an exciting partnership called Limeades For
Learning. With your help, I can get the funding I need to inspire my
students to learn.
Your part is simple. Just go to LimeadesForLearning.com to vote for my
project. SONIC is donating more than half a million dollars to the projects
that receive the most votes. But I need your help to make sure one's mine!
Here's the project I submitted:
I SEE NOW!--A Document Camera for Demos
 
http://www.limeadesforlearning.com/projects/view/420787/teacher
Votes are collected between August 31 and September 31. You can only vote
one time a day per email address. 
Go to LimeadesForLearning.com to learn more about it. And don't forget to
make your vote count. Thanks for your help!
Sincerely,
Tina Vercelli
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: sketchbooks
From: "Pokojski, Kelly" <Kelly-Pokojski@cdolinc.net>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 09:48:12 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8
Wow, I love this idea, thank you so much, including the rubber stamp
idea, brilliant and simple.
-----Original Message-----
From: San D Hasselman [mailto:shasselman@hotmail.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 3:08 AM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: RE: [teacherartexchange] sketchbooks
Hi Fran
Over the years I have made sketchbooks with my students. That said, I
taught high school, and the sewing books, with many signatures, then
sewn together was hard for them, so I can't imagine doing that with your
grade level. I would suggest an easier type of sketchbook. Here is an
easier one we also did.
You "tear" (looks like a deckle edge when you are finished) sheets of
paper (but you can also stack precut paper) into a pile of 25 pieces. We
used 25 because a) I didn't expect to get any more than that in terms of
sketches and b) binding technique, while very easy doesn't accomodate
more than that. You then have chipboard covers the same size (one for
top, and one for bottom). So you now have a stack of chipboard, pages,
chipboard. Remove the chipboard from the stack temporarily, and score
the side that you plan to bind, 1.5 inches away, from top to bottom,
using a pair of scissors opened up as your scoring tool, and a ruler. So
you now have a line, from top to bottom, that is cut partially through
the chipboard. Bend the chipboard on the line (opposite of the cut), so
that it looks like a door, same for the back piece but bend it the
"other way". Now take a hole puncher and punch all the sheets of paper,
AND the chip board covers in the same place, so that you only have two
holes along the side. We, then took duck tape in different colors and
overlapping the tape slightly "covered" the chipboard edge with the
holes, 2" wide, thus reinforcing the bend in the cardboard. You have to
then poke the holes back out with the point of a compass. You then
restack everything, and get those brass fasteners at staples with the
large "tails" and put it through the holes. To decorate the covers, we
used this as an opportunity to teach about positive and negative space,
and had our students design foam rubber stamps (2- one positive, one
negative), using the thin sheets of foam that they cut with scissors and
glued down onto cardboard, and they stamped their repetitive design in a
checkerboard fashion on a piece of paper, and glued that one top of
their sketchbook covers.
San D
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] sketchbooks
> From: fran.legman@gmail.com
> Date: Tue, 31 Aug 2010 21:59:59 -0400
> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
> 
> I would like my third through fifth grade classes this year to make
their own sketchbooks. Does anyone have a suggestion for a good way to
make them?
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>  		 	   		  
---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Getting the Guys Interested in Journaling ??
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Wed, 01 Sep 2010 12:51:01 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9
How ever you choose to make your pages and cover, when you're ready to poke
the
holes for the binding, clamp the whole thing together and use a power drill
to make
holes.  The boys love it.  Put an empty box under the drilling space so you
won't be
drilling the desks.  You can bind with binding combs--usually you can find a
binding
machine somewhere in your school.  You can also buy binder rings and just
use 2 or 3 of
them to hold it all together.  It's loose but you can easily add and take
out pages.
>>> <BigCrab99@aol.com> 9/1/2010 5:28 AM >>>
School begins for me on Tuesday after Labor  Day!  I am planning to do 
sketchbook journals with eighth graders.  I  have found many cool
journalilng 
ideas online and on You Tube, but I am need a  few ideas that will really 
"grab" the boys in my class.  I plan to give a  variety of ideas/lessons
from 
which they can choose, and I want to include  several that will really
relate 
to the boys.  
Carolyn in Virginia Beach (watching Earl!!)
---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: skecthbooks
From: Barbara Marder <marder621@rcn.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 16:02:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10
I use a dremel and it's perfect!
Barbara from Boston
Barbara from Boston
On Sep 1, 2010, at 3:51 PM, Sidnie Miller wrote:
> How ever you choose to make your pages and cover, when you're ready to
poke the
> holes for the binding, clamp the whole thing together and use a power
drill to make
> holes.  The boys love it.  Put an empty box under the drilling space so
you won't be
> drilling the desks.  You can bind with binding combs--usually you can find
a binding
> machine somewhere in your school.  You can also buy binder rings and just
use 2 or 3 of
> them to hold it all together.  It's loose but you can easily add and take
out pages.
> 
>>>> <BigCrab99@aol.com> 9/1/2010 5:28 AM >>>
> 
> School begins for me on Tuesday after Labor  Day!  I am planning to do 
> sketchbook journals with eighth graders.  I  have found many cool
journalilng 
> ideas online and on You Tube, but I am need a  few ideas that will really 
> "grab" the boys in my class.  I plan to give a  variety of ideas/lessons
from 
> which they can choose, and I want to include  several that will really
relate 
> to the boys.  
> 
> 
> Carolyn in Virginia Beach (watching Earl!!)
> 
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> 
> 
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Getting the Guys Interested in Journaling ??
From: Betty <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 13:08:13 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 11
I use the 3 hole adjustable paper drill. It goes through binding board too.
Clean safe quiet no shredded paper, smooth lined up holes. 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: china marker ideas?
From: sarah k <sarah.kerns3@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 17:32:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12
Fellow Art Teachers,
In the process of organizing my closet for the upcoming year, I came
across a decent amount of red, purple and blue china markers. I am new
to teaching grades 2 and 3, and have taught 4-8. Any ideas of what I
can do with these cool materials for any of these grades?
Thanks,
Sarah K.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Themes/ Unit/ Resource Ideas
From: sarah k <sarah.kerns3@gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 17:41:12 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13
Hello All,
I've been given the huge task of creating an awesome art program at
our new school. I have very limited materials and a great amount of
time with each class. I have worked with K-8 children before, but not
always in a classroom setting (more like summer camp). I think one of
the easiest things for me, at least for this year and more on the
elementary side, is to break the school year into themes and/ or
units. Does anyone have suggestions for successful themes/ units/
lessons that have worked for them? Or could you lead me in the
direction of some good resources for developing my program?
Thanks and Happy School Year!
Sarah K.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: sketchbooks
From: jeryl HOLLINGSWORTH <hollingsworth005@bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 15:05:50 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 14
My 3rd - 6th graders make sketchbooks using the cheap paper folders with
prongs 
and pockets. I watch for the sales and get them for .05 at Staples at the 
beginning of the year. We hole punch about 25 sheets of copy paper and put
it in 
the folders. I use a different color for each class - they put their name
and 
class code on the cover and then can decorate. I like the pockets because
they 
can store notes or small projects there.  At the end of class, each table
group 
stacks their sketchbooks going the same direction and I pick them up as I
check 
their tables and supply baskets. I store the sketchbooks in the lid of a
copy 
paper box. I put each stack in the box alternating so before their next
class, I 
grab the box off from the shelf used to store their class' work. I have 4
sets 
of table groups so I just put a stack at each table and as they come in to
sit 
down they can quickly get their book and sit down and start on their
sketchbook 
assignment which is posted on the board (theoretically)!!
        Jeryl in SC
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Themes/ Unit/ Resource Ideas
From: "Pokojski, Kelly" <Kelly-Pokojski@cdolinc.net>
Date: Wed, 1 Sep 2010 17:08:58 -0500
X-Message-Number: 15
I teach in a very limited school also and I find that having art
supplies on the school supply list is essential...
Crayola 24 count colored pencils
Crayola 8 count water colors
I usually assign each grade anything from scissors to glue to erasers or
colored pencils...5.00 each grade is the average.
I teach elements of art with integrated art history in the lower grades
beginning with line and then projects surrounding a period of art and
artist for grades 5-8.
Lastly, I plan my art so the lessons are the same for grades 1/2, 3/4,
5/6 and 7/8...I teach in the Junior High also and I am a homeroom
teacher so I need to cut back on the number of different activities.
I also have two rooms so it's fun and unique as teaching goes.
I find that these great teachers have wonderful ideas and have posted
curriculums in the past...
Good luck.
Kelly-pokojski@cdolinc.net
-----Original Message-----
From: sarah k [mailto:sarah.kerns3@gmail.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, September 01, 2010 4:41 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Themes/ Unit/ Resource Ideas
Hello All,
I've been given the huge task of creating an awesome art program at
our new school. I have very limited materials and a great amount of
time with each class. I have worked with K-8 children before, but not
always in a classroom setting (more like summer camp). I think one of
the easiest things for me, at least for this year and more on the
elementary side, is to break the school year into themes and/ or
units. Does anyone have suggestions for successful themes/ units/
lessons that have worked for them? Or could you lead me in the
direction of some good resources for developing my program?
Thanks and Happy School Year!
Sarah K.
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END OF DIGEST
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sueossanna@optonline.net
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