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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 17, 2009

---------

From: Daniel Murren (djmurren_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Sep 19 2009 - 13:11:48 PDT


I am planning to do a lesson on Wayne Thiebaud "Paint a cake". It will be
done on drawing paper with cheap thin acrylic paint. Is there a way to make
the paint thicker to add frosting flowers? I don't want anything too thick
that might fall off the paper. I showed my 6th. and 7th. grade students a
YouTube video done by CBS Sunday morning show and they were so excited to
start drawing their ideas for cakes.
Sue Murren

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Friday, September 18, 2009 4:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 17, 2009

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, September 17, 2009.

1. Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2009
2. keeping track of 25 classes-long post
3. K-8 Planner Help
4. K-8 Planner Help
5. Re: keeping track of 25 classes-long post
6. Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2009
7. RE: keeping track of 25 classes-long post
8. Help! I need a memory boost
9. RE: Help! I need a memory boost
10. RE: Help! I need a memory boost
11. If you have a moment, would you vote for my student?
12. Re: K-8 Planner Help
13. Re: Re: K-8 Planner Help
14. Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2009
15. RE: Re: K-8 Planner Help

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2009
From: Mollie <mollieomara@verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 07:51:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

HI
I use an excel doc. and like to input when I get home - when you get
good at it you can input very fast and color code grades.
mollie o'mara
the epiphany school
On Sep 17, 2009, at 4:00 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
digest wrote:

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, September 16, 2009.
>
> 1. K-8 Planner Help
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: K-8 Planner Help
> From: "Roshanda Burtscher" <rburtsch@artbyro.com>
> Date: Wed, 16 Sep 2009 18:17:03 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Hi all. I'm a long time lurker, but this is my first post. I am a
> first year
> teacher at a charter school in Ohio, teaching k-8 art. Things have
> been
> going pretty good so far, but I am having trouble keeping track of
> what each
> class is doing. I have a total of 25 classes (I meet with them 1 day a
> week). I have been using a chart to write everything down but it
> just isn't
> working for me. I was wondering if anyone might have some ideas for
> me or a
> suggestion for a k-8 planner. I looked online but couldn't find
> anything.
>
> Thanks for everything I've already learned from this great group!
> Roshanda
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
mollieomara@verizon.net
leave-645723-334180.4c097f14d2be84395877ca203a633030@lists.pub.getty.edu

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: keeping track of 25 classes-long post
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 12:30:16 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2

I might not be the one to address this, as I have never taught elementary
school or have had the situation you have. I do have some questions for you
and perhaps in asking them, it may prompt you to think about a way to
organize.
 
1. Is it possible for all of the 1st graders (for example) to be working on
LINE, and thus narrowing down for you what each "grade" is working on and
making it easier for you to remember what they are doing?
 
2. Is it possible for you to map out your "semester" (or however the time is
broken up) NOW, so that you know that the next idea the 1st graders would be
working on would be SHAPE (for example), so that if one 1st grade finishes
before the next, you know that the next piece they will be working on would
be SHAPE?
 
3. Could you set up each class (again I'lls ay 1st graders) to be associated
with an artist, so that for example if you did choose to do LINE with 1st
graders, they would be working on something like a Juan Miro or KLee, thus
associating each class with an artist in your organization of ideas?
 
4. Your state should have standards that they expect students to reach
certain goals by certain grades (I know New Jersey does). We charted the
standards so that we know what is expected for the end of each grade level.
The elementary school art teachers concentrate on those goals which are
wrapped around the elements and principles, so that all 1st graders would be
accomplished in line for example at the end (along with the other art
standards required for them to know). So if you see 25 classes a week, and 5
of them are 1st grade, they would all start with line, then shape, then
form, then color, etc and art history would be included by associating with
an artist for each of the the E & P (which specific ones are expected to be
covered by the standards).
 
My comments are precipitated by the fact that I gave my Beginning drawing
students (in high school and they are in grades 9-12) a pretest to see what
they know. They were asked to draw a building, a person, a tree, a fence,
and a mode of transportation. Their drawings were horrible (and I know that
I hear them all say "I can't draw"), without any overlapping, plopped in the
center of the paper, no perspective, lollipop trees, box cars, midget people
with smiley faces and of course the obligator sun with lines coming off, in
the corner of the paper. I will be giving them the same assignment during
their final exam at the end of the course.
 
This pretest indicates a few things to me.
 
1. Not all students had an art experience recently, and since we have only a
9 week art experience for 7-8th graders, their exposure was limited on that
level. Also if you are in 12th grade and you haven't had it since 7-8th
grade it's been awhile.
 
2. Students may be getting the elements and principles, as well as figure
work, face work, landscape work, etc, but in a way that is not building one
skill or idea on another, but as separate "projects" in their art classes.
So when asked (as in the pretest) to gleen what they know (i.e. perspective,
figure work, drawing from observation) they can't make the distinction of
what the project was actually teaching them.
 
3. High Schoolers typically "blow off" this type of pretest as a meaningless
assignment.
 
4. I am sure there are a myriad of other reasons why the drawings were
awful, but 1-3 are my top three.
 
I then critiqued their finished work, and in the process said "this is what
you will learn to do in this class" as if to indicate, "don't worry about
your pretest, you will learn to do this in this class". Their after drawings
are always much better, and they are always amazed at what they can do and
learn how to do.
 
San D
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: K-8 Planner Help
From: Robin Gianis <rgianis@bridgehampton.k12.ny.us>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 09:06:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

I do grades K-12 in one small school. I think it is a challenge, your
schedule, but I know after 7 years here that eventually I will have my
schedule memorized. I make a grid with my weekly schedule by time periods
(moving from upper page to bottom) and then by days(going across). Luckily
my schedule only changes slightly from A days to b days, but is otherwise
the same week to week. I do my weekly plan book in a similar fashion, noting
lesson objectives for each class, as well as duties, etc...
Hope this helps.
Robin in Bridgehampton, NY

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Thursday, September 17, 2009 4:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2009

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, September 16, 2009.

1. K-8 Planner Help

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: K-8 Planner Help
From: "Sue Cosgrove" <cosgrovs@cisdmail.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 08:23:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

Hello. Here is what I have started doing. I make an 8 1/2 X 11 example
of all of my projects. Take photos of the 3D stuff. I write the
directions on the back and laminate them. Then I keep these in a
notebook.

I have created a generic lesson plan according to my district's specs
for each of my broad areas specific to each grade level. Each of these
generic lesson plans has the state curricular info in it too. I just
leave the materials list and instructions out of the lesson plans. I
slip my laminated example with instructions in the notebook in the
lesson plan. This way I don't have to write a whole new lesson plan for
each new project. And when my district changes formats for their lesson
plans (which they love to do) I can just change a few pages and it works
with all my projects over the years.

My goal is to have a notebook headed with drawing lesson plans for all
levels. Then have a painting notebook etc. I keep the current lesson
plan and example on my desk in case I am evaluated. Also I have a
project wall with each grade level labeled. I hang the example under
the tag for the grade level. Students and I always know what they are
doing and know what their brothers and sisters are doing as well.

Sue Cosgrove
Art Teacher
Carroll Elementary School
817-949-4353

Success is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm.
b
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: keeping track of 25 classes-long post
From: bmarder@somerville.mec.edu
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 11:43:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

I teach K-8 and use a planning book.
I organize strands of lessons for each grade loosely connected to the
curriculum topics. I teach 30 classes each week.

Examples of specific lessons:
K studies people in the community-so we make city mural -each
student's picture has elements they cut and attach to the mural.

Grade 1 studies holidays so we make crafts and pictures that relate to
holidays around the world

Grade 2 studies Christopher Columbus so we paint ships in different
weatehr conditions

Grade 3 astudies rocks and minerals so we make "rock" stars

Grade 4 studies water and land mass so we make random waterways by
blowing blue paint through a straw and painting land mass around it

Grade 5 studies Am. history so we create native American crafts and
American folk art

etc for each grade. I connect various artists to the above ideas and
teach the students some art history along with the hands on segment.

I keep a planning book because i have one class after another six times a
day
I keep table plans and srpead sheets of studnet progress
Gettin goragnized takes up a lot of time at the start of the school
year but saves so much time down the road
Hope that helps
Barbara from Boston
They create fire engines and police trucks etcQuoting San D Hasselman
<shasselman@hotmail.com>:

>
> I might not be the one to address this, as I have never taught
> elementary school or have had the situation you have. I do have some
> questions for you and perhaps in asking them, it may prompt you to
> think about a way to organize.
>
> 1. Is it possible for all of the 1st graders (for example) to be
> working on LINE, and thus narrowing down for you what each "grade"
> is working on and making it easier for you to remember what they
> are doing?
>
> 2. Is it possible for you to map out your "semester" (or however the
> time is broken up) NOW, so that you know that the next idea the 1st
> graders would be working on would be SHAPE (for example), so that
> if one 1st grade finishes before the next, you know that the next
> piece they will be working on would be SHAPE?
>
> 3. Could you set up each class (again I'lls ay 1st graders) to be
> associated with an artist, so that for example if you did choose to
> do LINE with 1st graders, they would be working on something like a
> Juan Miro or KLee, thus associating each class with an artist in
> your organization of ideas?
>
> 4. Your state should have standards that they expect students to
> reach certain goals by certain grades (I know New Jersey does). We
> charted the standards so that we know what is expected for the end
> of each grade level. The elementary school art teachers concentrate
> on those goals which are wrapped around the elements and principles,
> so that all 1st graders would be accomplished in line for example
> at the end (along with the other art standards required for them to
> know). So if you see 25 classes a week, and 5 of them are 1st
> grade, they would all start with line, then shape, then form, then
> color, etc and art history would be included by associating with an
> artist for each of the the E & P (which specific ones are expected
> to be covered by the standards).
>
> My comments are precipitated by the fact that I gave my Beginning
> drawing students (in high school and they are in grades 9-12) a
> pretest to see what they know. They were asked to draw a building, a
> person, a tree, a fence, and a mode of transportation. Their
> drawings were horrible (and I know that I hear them all say "I can't
> draw"), without any overlapping, plopped in the center of the
> paper, no perspective, lollipop trees, box cars, midget people with
> smiley faces and of course the obligator sun with lines coming off,
> in the corner of the paper. I will be giving them the same
> assignment during their final exam at the end of the course.
>
> This pretest indicates a few things to me.
>
> 1. Not all students had an art experience recently, and since we
> have only a 9 week art experience for 7-8th graders, their exposure
> was limited on that level. Also if you are in 12th grade and you
> haven't had it since 7-8th grade it's been awhile.
>
> 2. Students may be getting the elements and principles, as well as
> figure work, face work, landscape work, etc, but in a way that is
> not building one skill or idea on another, but as separate
> "projects" in their art classes. So when asked (as in the pretest)
> to gleen what they know (i.e. perspective, figure work, drawing from
> observation) they can't make the distinction of what the project
> was actually teaching them.
>
> 3. High Schoolers typically "blow off" this type of pretest as a
> meaningless assignment.
>
> 4. I am sure there are a myriad of other reasons why the drawings
> were awful, but 1-3 are my top three.
>
> I then critiqued their finished work, and in the process said "this
> is what you will learn to do in this class" as if to indicate,
> "don't worry about your pretest, you will learn to do this in this
> class". Their after drawings are always much better, and they are
> always amazed at what they can do and learn how to do.
>
> San D
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2009
From: Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 08:46:27 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 6

I used to try to use a standard teacher's planner, but because they are
geared toward academic classrooms, that didn't work out. I just decided to
create my own system. I laid out a grid system with a column for class
times on the left, and boxes with each class labeled with the homeroom
teacher laid out horizontally across the page. I constructed what I would
call "two weeks at a glance", enabling me to quickly see which groups I
would teach each day and which step in a project I was teaching. On the
bottom of the page, I put a place for days and dates. This was laid out in
legal size, easily xeroxed and bound into a booklet. I did not find it
necessary to get too detailed in each box, just indicate the name of the
project. If you are interested, contact me off-list and I will send you an
example.

--- On Thu, 9/17/09, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:

> From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2009
> To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Date: Thursday, September 17, 2009, 4:00 AM
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for
> Wednesday, September 16, 2009.
>
> 1. K-8 Planner Help
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: K-8 Planner Help
> From: "Roshanda Burtscher" <rburtsch@artbyro.com>
> Date: Wed, 16 Sep 2009 18:17:03 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Hi all. I'm a long time lurker, but this is my first post.
> I am a first year
> teacher at a charter school in Ohio, teaching k-8 art.
> Things have been
> going pretty good so far, but I am having trouble keeping
> track of what each
> class is doing. I have a total of 25 classes (I meet with
> them 1 day a
> week). I have been using a chart to write everything down
> but it just isn't
> working for me. I was wondering if anyone might have some
> ideas for me or a
> suggestion for a k-8 planner. I looked online but couldn't
> find anything.
>
> Thanks for everything I've already learned from this great
> group!
> Roshanda
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
leave-645723-51973.e914db7a13fcf852a53fed682f3df33d@lists.pub.getty.edu
>

      

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: keeping track of 25 classes-long post
From: "Pokojski, Kelly" <Kelly-Pokojski@cdolinc.net>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 11:14:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 7

I teach in a small school, 13 art classes a week and 10 to 15 classes in
another subject (social studies) so I find that it is easier to teach
the same lesson in bulk, I teach the same lesson to 1/2 3/4 5/6 and 7/8,
with my schedule it works best. There are many days normally that I
don't have a plan period so this also helps with set up and clean up. I
usually have 5 minutes between classes.

I love my grade book its big bold and simple

ELAN Combination Plan and Record Book
Edition PR-7-6

The others are way to filled with stuff and decoration I don't want.

I also have a binder with all my lessons/powerpoints by grade so I can
look at the powerpoints or lesson I wrote or downloaded from the
internet. The dividers have pockets so I can put stuff in that I think I
might need.

Lastly I have a crate for each combination of classes and the materials
that I will need for the project so I can just bring it out and set up
and put them back since my projects usually take 5 plus weeks.

Take care.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Help! I need a memory boost
From: Tina Vercelli <tvercelli@ardmore.k12.ok.us>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 14:41:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 8

A couple of years ago I had an ad for a group that rented life-size
reproductions of Van goghs, Kalhos, and Picassos to display in schools. For
the life of me I can't remember what company does it! I think it's one of
the big Art supply catalogs but I could be wrong. Anyone out there know what
I'm talking about?

Thanks
TinaV

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Help! I need a memory boost
From: <Laura.Drietz@k12.sd.us>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 15:13:45 -0500
X-Message-Number: 9

Teacher's Discovery is the first one that came to my mind:

http://www.teachersdiscovery-foreignlanguage.com/template.asp?content=search
_display.asp&SKW=tlex%2Cmurr&CAT=711

Laura Drietz
Art Teacher
Brookings Middle School
E-mail laura.drietz@k12.sd.us

A couple of years ago I had an ad for a group that rented life-size
reproductions of Van goghs, Kalhos, and Picassos to display in schools. For
the life of me I can't remember what company does it! I think it's one of
the big Art supply catalogs but I could be wrong. Anyone out there know what
I'm talking about?

Thanks
TinaV

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Help! I need a memory boost
From: Cheryl Lloyd <clloyd@ceres.k12.ca.us>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 13:43:50 -0700
X-Message-Number: 10

I used Teacher's Discovery last year for our fine arts night and loved it.
Very impressive displays.
Cheri Lloyd
Ceres, CA

Teacher's Discovery is the first one that came to my mind:

http://www.teachersdiscovery-foreignlanguage.com/template.asp?content=search
_display.asp&SKW=tlex%2Cmurr&CAT=71

A couple of years ago I had an ad for a group that rented life-size
reproductions of Van goghs, Kalhos, and Picassos to display in schools. For
the life of me I can't remember what company does it! I think it's one of
the big Art supply catalogs but I could be wrong. Anyone out there know what
I'm talking about?

Thanks
TinaV

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: If you have a moment, would you vote for my student?
From: Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 17:53:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11
Kaylee1182, Sherwood, Ohio
 has been selected has a finalist for this week's "Artist of the Week" on
Artsonia.
 The finalist who receives the most online votes between now and Saturday
 September 19 will be selected as our "Artist of the Week."
 You can vote once a day here:
 http://www.artsonia.com/aotw/vote/0/6035628
Funny story- my principal today said that she voted and then asked me, "What
was that thing she made?" lol. Art really is subjective. It was a Nevelson
sculpture that little Kaylee made in kindergarten last year. She had moved
away before it was finished, but she has moved back to our district and her
parents signed the release for Artsonia, so I put it on the site. It
certainly goes to show that the "Artist Of The Week" program on Artsonia is
totally random. I would really appreciate your vote so that Kaylee can get
that $50 gift card for some art goodies and I wouldn't mind the $100 toward
a new printing press!
Thank you so much!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: K-8 Planner  Help
From: Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 18:20:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12
Hello! Fellow Ohio art teacher here.
I use binders for each grade level to keep the actual lesson plans that I
write up. In the front of the binder is an index of the lessons that I am
doing for the year. 
For example:
Fourth Grade 2009-2010
1. Name Kaleidoscopes- marker
2. Native American Pottery- mixed media collage- Social Studies & Art
3. Leaves- Air dry clay & Magic Metallics- Science & Art
4. Aminah Robinson Quilts- sewing project- Ohio Artist
5. Romare Bearden- collage- Music & Art
6. Art Career Postage Stamp- Sharpie marker
7. Winter Birch Trees- watercolor 
8. Musical Mandalas- CDs & Sharpie Marker- Art & Math 
9. Picasso Portraits- printing
10. Woodburning or Texture Board- gouache
11. Andy Warhol Color Theory Animals- tempera
12. Natasha Wescoat Flowers- colored pencil drawing
13. Elijah Pierce- Assemblage- Ohio Artist
14. Clay- Cityscapes 
15. Tech- Black & White with a Touch of Color- Digital Photography
16. Tech- iMovie & Garage band
These are the lessons I hope to cover in the year- of course, we know that
doesn't always happen! I keep the lesson plans, handouts, small photos or
examples, all in these binders, in clear sleeves, so that they can be
removed if necessary. Large examples are kept in big portfolios.
For the day to day lesson plans, I still use the standard "teacher issued
lesson plan book" and write down what step of the lesson we are doing on
that day. With fourth grade, for example, we are working on the Name
Kaleidoscopes, so my lesson plans (in the little square) for today looked
like this:
- finish coating the back of the name square with Ebony
- fold large white paper into fourths
- transfer name designs to large square paper
- trace in black Sharpie
My principal knows about my binders at this point, but only makes me turn in
my lesson plan book. Less work for her, I guess. :)
I hope that answers your question- I kinda wrote a lot of info here!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Re: K-8 Planner  Help
From: Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 18:36:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13
Here is an artistic lesson plan book, filled with drawings:
http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?listing_id=29461857
25% of the sales are given to arts in education, but I don't know if the
book is very practical. Pretty cool, but practical?
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 16, 2009
From: "Angela Davidson" <addartistic@msn.com>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 18:33:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 14
Roshanda:
I teach PK-12 art.  I have HS and MS in the mornings on an A-B Block 
Schedule.  I have Elementary on a 6 day schedule in the afternoons.  I 
created my own 6 day Calendar/Planner with a page for each of my 6 day 
schedule.  Day A1, B2, A3.. etc.  I have a page for each day based on the 
the times of the classes with my lunch schedule. I print it 2 sided with 
hole punches and put it in a binder on my desk. I print off a semesters work
of pages. I have spaces at the top to pencil in the day and date.  I pencil 
in my plans for each class a couple weeks a head.  After I have a class, I 
pencil in any notes of things I need to remember specific to that group on 
the day I have them next.  It works very well and keeps me on track. It also
is helpful for the sub.  I took the liberty to email you a copy of my 
schedule.
Hope that helps!
Angela D.
Martensdale-St. Marys
Iowa
> 1. K-8 Planner  Help
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> Hi all. I'm a long time lurker, but this is my first post. I am a first 
> year
> teacher at a charter school in Ohio, teaching k-8 art. Things have been
> going pretty good so far, but I am having trouble keeping track of what 
> each
> class is doing. I have a total of 25 classes (I meet with them 1 day a
> week). I have been using a chart to write everything down but it just 
> isn't
> working for me. I was wondering if anyone might have some ideas for me or 
> a
> suggestion for a k-8 planner. I looked online but couldn't find anything.
>
> Thanks for everything I've already learned from this great group!
> Roshanda
>
>
> 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Re: K-8 Planner  Help
From: Cheryl Lloyd <clloyd@ceres.k12.ca.us>
Date: Thu, 17 Sep 2009 19:46:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 15
Hi Roshanda,
I also use an excel spreadsheet that I make myself with boxes for each
period.  My students come to me at strange times like 10:05-10:50, so I
never remember who is coming and when.  I keep it to one page with simple
notes about the lessons (lesson objective, materials, etc.)  Then I have
color coded file folders with print outs of the lesson plans, rubrics, and
examples.  I keep them on my desk in a hanging file crate.  I have them
organized by grade level colored coded.  There nametags are the same color.
I also use sketchbooks where students write down notes about the lesson and
paste small photos of artists, works, examples.  I keep these printed and
copied in library pockets that I glue to the front of the file folder.  
This seems to work well for me.  I only work with about 15 classes a week,so
it is a manageable system.  
I love hearing everyone else's ideas on this topic.  Organization is such an
important topic in teaching and I love all these BFOs (Blinding Flash of the
Obvious).  I am constantly amazed at how many times a day I think, that's
great...why didn't I think of that years ago?  Thanks everyone...keep em'
coming.  
Cheri Lloyd
Ceres, CA  
---
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