Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 11, 2008

---------

From: Sherry Syrie (ssyrie_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Fri Sep 12 2008 - 09:45:56 PDT


As a 6th grade art teacher, I do a realistic shoe drawing activity at
the beginning portion of the quarter that is GREAT for drawing what you
see (to the nearest stitch). First, the students learn about line and
what the 5 main kinds of lines mean (horizontal lines show "rest",
vertical lines show "strength" etc.), then we do an activity that
teaches about value and ways to show texture (we practice using
hatching, stippling, smearing, etc.) To begin drawing your shoe you
start with line, then when the skeleton of the shoe is complete and
looks proportionate and accurate, you add the details that fill your
shoe in. I check the shoes periodically and help the kids troubleshoot
how to show fabric, leather, shoe laces etc. Then, when they have a
beautiful, well drawn, accurate shoe, we turn the shoe into something
"Larger Than Life". The kids then add other extra details that make
their shoes become; whales, rocket ships, alligators, alien space
crafts...whatever. I require that the shoe is still visible (details
and all) yet it tends to "disappear" in the final, colored "Larger Than
Life" picture. It's a CRAZY, AWESOME project and the fact that it goes
from a realistic observational drawing of a shoe to an imaginative one
is the best!

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Friday, September 12, 2008 1:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 11, 2008

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, September 11, 2008.

1. Re: Teaching to Observe
2. Re: Teaching to Observe
3. Re: Teaching to Observe
4. Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
5. Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
6. Observation in 3D!!
7. Re: Observation in 3D!!
8. Re: Help! new preschool assignment
9. Re: Teaching to Observe
10. Re: Teaching to Observe
11. RE: Teaching to Observe
12. 9 - 11 Art on My Blog
13. RE: teaching to observe
14. Re: Teaching to Observe
15. Re: Re:teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
16. Subject: Teaching to Observe
17. Re: Subject: Teaching to Observe
18. RE: Subject: shading
19. Re: Teaching to Observe
20. Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
21. Re: Teaching to Observe
22. Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
23. Re: Subject: Teaching to Observe
24. Re: Subject: Teaching to Observe
25. Digital curriculum, resources, and workshops

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Teaching to Observe
From: Sharon <sharon@art-rageous.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 06:13:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

The second day of school I put the words "Observation", "Imagination"
and "Memory" on the board and had the kids give me definitions and
tell me the differences between them. They concluded that memory and
imagination are related because if you can't remember all the details
of something, imagination takes over.

Then I had them divide a piece of sketchbook paper in half. On the
top half, I had them draw a piece of popcorn from memory. On the
bottom half, I asked them to draw a circle and then turn it into an
M&M. (Some kids' memories were pretty good and they got the font
correct.) For good measure, I then had them draw, from memory, the
M&M cartoon characters.

I had them flip their papers over as I passed out napkins, gave them
popcorn and small snack size packages of M&Ms and had them draw from
observation. Of course their observational drawings were much more
realistic.

Might not be practical with large classes, but whenever I can involve
food (I've also used popcorn and Oreos or other familiar candy like
Hershey Kisses) I can usually get their attention. :-)

On Thu, Sep 11, 2008 at 1:47 AM, Chantal Pinnow <cpinnow@yisseoul.org>
wrote:
>
>
> Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
> see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class was
doing an
> observation painting of their open lockers. I got very frustrated with
kids
> who after a couple of days, didn't even have their locker open or
wouldn't
> rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on the first day.
Their
> answer was always "I know what it looks like." My question is "How do
you do
> an observation drawing if you aren't observing anything?" I understand
that
> some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are doing
observation
> paintings.
>
> I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what
something
> looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may notice
things
> are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just left and I
was a
> bit frustrated with them.
> Chantal

-- 
Sharon
www.art-rageous.net
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Teaching to Observe
From: "Gwen Copeland" <dain@heartoftn.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 06:34:48 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2
I usually start drawing classes with a memory/seen drawing of something 
fairly simple & well known - like pretzels or popcorn. I ask them to
fold a 
sheet of paper in half & draw one from memory after briefly talking
about 
the object. (They label this "Memory Drawing") Then I pass out the
actual 
thing - along with extras to eat while they're working. I tell them
they're 
not "drawing" but rather recording visual information that they see,
like a 
scientist who's discovered a new life form. Almost like a hypnotists, I 
quietly talk to them as they work telling them to notice how parts
overlap, 
how it's constructed, what they see to know what it feels like. The more
they see, the more they can record. Afterwards I ask them to compare the
2 
drawings; which is "best" & why? I explain that both can be good - have
some 
natural "Haring's" out there - but usually the seen drawing is voted
"the 
best" because it looks more life-like.
This is an old exercise from somewhere - but it seems to work -- & it's 
great to refer back to .
Gwen Copeland
 Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
> see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class was
doing 
> an
> observation painting of their open lockers. I got very frustrated with
> kids
> who after a couple of days, didn't even have their locker open or
wouldn't
> rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on the first day.
Their
> answer was always "I know what it looks like." My question is "How do
you 
> do
> an observation drawing if you aren't observing anything?" I understand
> that
> some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are doing
observation
> paintings.
>
> I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what
something
> looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may notice 
> things
> are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just left and I
was a
> bit frustrated with them.
> Chantal
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
dain@heartoftn.net
>
leave-551442-47231.206116d9f79049ae26fe3c8d62f135ff@lists.pub.getty.edu
> 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Teaching to Observe
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 06:43:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3
My favorite is to have them first draw an Oreo cookie from memory on a 
folded sheet of paper. Then I give them an actual cookie to draw on the 
other 1/2 of the paper. They are always amazed at the detail they see
once 
they have the actual product in front of them. THEN I won't allow them
to 
slack on me. If your students are supposed to be drawing from
observation & 
they start drawing from memory, I would just say "you drew from
observation 
on days 1 & 2, day 3 you drew from memory. Since the assignment was to
draw 
from observation you have earned 2/3 of the grade". Don't allow them to
make 
the rules.
~Michal
> Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
> see, not just what they think they know it looks like? 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
From: "Shannon Pultz" <shannonpultz@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 04:54:21 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4
Dear All,
I am putting together a thesis problem/proposal for the M Ed and would
very much appreciate any ideas. I've had difficulty thus far finding
peer-reviewed studies on the topic and am not seeking out other
directions to gather information.
I teach 9-12 at Pittsburgh's High School for Creative and Performing
Arts.
The district has decided to merge the high school with our arts magnet
6-8 "feeder" school. Starting next academic year we will have 6-12 in
the same building.
Currently, there is no curriculum at either school. Our department
coordinator has suggested we put one in place.
My thesis concerns visual art curriculum design and content for the
gifted and talented in a 6-12 school setting.
Any ideas on where to research, suggestions of art teachers to speak
to, districts with similar strong visual art focus, etc. would be
greatly appreciated.
THANKS!
Shannon
On Thu, Sep 11, 2008 at 1:00 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, September 10, 2008.
>
> 1. Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 2. loose graphite
> 3. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 4. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 5. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 6. A bit OT - call for help in TX
> 7. Help!  new preschool assignment
> 8. RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 9. RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 10. Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 11. Teaching to Observe
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 05:44:55 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> I think the custodian is being unreasonable.  If you don't want to
> clean, don't get a job cleaning!  I'm sure you do all you can to keep
> it contained, and it's not like you're always leaving messes for him
> to clean up.  It sounds like the VP realizes he's being unreasonable,
> too.
>
> I didn't know about the sticky mat.  That's a neat idea.
>
> Other than that, the only thing I could think of would be to keep a
> swiffer or something around and don't let the kids walk out until
> you've swiffer'd.  Maybe even have them remove their shoes and keep
> them by the classroom door, so that the stuff doesn't get onto the
> shoes and tracked out of the classroom.  If that doesn't make him
> happy, he's probably determined not to be and there isn't much you can
> do about it.
>
> -b-
>
>
>
> On Tue, Sep 9, 2008 at 10:37 PM, Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
wrote:
>>
>> I decided several things, like -loose graphite is awesome, and the
difference it made in this project is worth the trouble. It helped my
kids loosen up, their drawings look freer and more relaxed.
>>
>> The vice-principal called me at home tonight about this, and wanted
to know what they could buy me to help. They are trying to be helpful
and are not trying to get me to not use these projects. (She told me the
same custodian used to yell at her for using glitter) My actual
classroom custodian is awesome, and is not the least bit bothered, its
just the guy in the cafeteria. I guess I am just embarassed that this
was my first real interaction with the new principal.
>>
>> sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room and
not let it leak into the hall.
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> --
> Carpe You Some Diem!
> Website: http://www.rebeccaburch.com
> Store: http://carpeyousomediem.etsy.com
> Network: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccaburch
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: loose graphite
> From: Pam Wellington <loveart@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 10:56:42 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
>
> Dear Betty,
> When I use charcoal I give the students a dust pan and have them sweep
all the  looose charcoal which is on the table and any that landed on
the floor into the pan and into the trash.  HOWEVER, you never, ever
need to apologize for making a mess in the art room!  Don't ever
apologize to anyone for it!  Art classes are MESSY. The job of the
custodian is to CLEAN.  That is what he/she gets PAID to do.  It is
rediculous for any administrator to even give an ear to any custodian
complaining about having to clean up a legitimate mess made in any room!
But ART?!  Don't let it get to you.  The custodian who complained is the
one who should be in trouble, not you!  As long as the mess is
reasonable, not deliberate or over the top.
> Pam Wellington
> Art Dept. Chair
> Boiling Springs H.S
> Boiling Springs,Pa
>
>
>> Subject: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> From: Betty B
>> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2008 13:16:18 -0700 (PDT)
>> X-Message-Number: 2
>>
>> Before the school year started, I found my first-year journal, and I
wrote about how, when I did charcoal, the custodian told other teachers
she would quit if they didn't get rid of me. Well, it is 8 years later
and I haven't done charcoal or loose graphite since.
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Peshette, Alix" <apeshette@placercoe.k12.ca.us>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 09:30:12 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Betty,
> I'm glad to hear that the vice-principal called wanting to solve the
> problem with better equipment.  Like Ken, I don't know what loose
> graphite and charcoal are, but I can guess at the set-up and cleaning
> issues.  Some thoughts that come to mind are:
>
> Like glitter (I laughed out loud about your vice-principal's comments
on
> her glitter use), maybe the students need to be working in an
> environment that has an edge - like inside the lid of a paper box.
This
> way the graphite will have more containment.
>
> If this stuff has a tendency to be somewhat airborne, maybe it needs
to
> be used in what would be a "spray painting booth."  One can build one
> these with PVC pipe and fittings (no glue so that it can be
> disassembled) and a roll of plastic sheeting from the local hardware
big
> box store.  The booth can sit on a table top or be a full-size
walk-in.
>
>
> I totally appreciate the conundrum of messy art and custodians.  I
once
> did a three-week paper mache skeleton project for Dia de Los Muertos
> with 7th graders in a portable classroom that had carpeting.  The
> students' skeletons were fabulous, but the room was never quite the
> same!  LOL!  I was also very, very, very nice to my custodian for the
> rest of my time in that classroom!
>
> -Alix
> (former junior high art teacher)
>
>
> Alix E. Peshette
> Instructional Technology Coordinator
> Placer County Office of Education
> 360 Nevada St.
> Auburn, CA.  95603  USA
> 530-889-5976
> apeshette@placercoe.k12.ca.us
> http://www.placercoe.k12.ca.us
> Blog: http://www.k12hsn.org/edzone/blogs.php/alixpeshette/
> http://del.icio.us/artfully
>
> "Technology - opening minds with a new set of keys"
>
> NOTICE: This e-mail message, including any attachments, is for the
sole
> use of the intended recipient or recipients and may contain
confidential
> and/or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient
or
> agent thereof, be advised that you have received this e-mail in error
> and any use, dissemination, disclosure, forwarding, printing, copying,
> or any action taken in reliance on the contents of this e-mail is
> strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error, please
> notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail and delete the original
> message, attachments, and all copies of the original message from your
> system.
>
> Please note that any views and/or opinions presented in this e-mail
are
> solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of
the
> Placer County Office of Education.
>
> Finally, the recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments
for
> the presence of viruses. Although the Placer County Office of
Education
> has taken reasonable precautions to ensure no viruses are present in
> this e-mail, it accepts no liability for any loss or damage arising
from
> the use of this e-mail or attachments.
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Betty B [mailto:bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 7:38 PM
> Subject: Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
>
> I decided several things, like -loose graphite is awesome, and the
> difference it made in this project is worth the trouble. It helped my
> kids loosen up, their drawings look freer and more relaxed.
>
> The vice-principal called me at home tonight about this, and wanted to
> know what they could buy me to help. They are trying to be helpful and
> are not trying to get me to not use these projects. (She told me the
> same custodian used to yell at her for using glitter) My actual
> classroom custodian is awesome, and is not the least bit bothered, its
> just the guy in the cafeteria. I guess I am just embarassed that this
> was my first real interaction with the new principal.
>
> sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
and
> not let it leak into the hall.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 12:41:17 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
>
> "sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
and
> not let it leak into the hall."
>
> And that's the wonder and beauty of it all.
> Jan in Tampa
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 10:12:43 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> For those of you who don't use loose graphite - it is
> General's Graphite, "since 1889" I'll post some photos of finished
pieces later.
>
> It has gone ok so far today, telling the kids no more graphite, but
one troubled young man who loves art, and had an excellent drawing, just
totally shut down, as there was "no point" in going on. The others who
were behind were fine with using the ebony pencils. He put his drawing
in the trash and just sat staring unblinking all hour, tearing little
notecards up into tiny bits, which is what he does when stressed.
> So managing to not cry was my big accomplishment, but I did take his
drawing out of the trash and tomorrow hopefully they will have the
"carpenters felt" they think will work, and he can do it then.
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: A bit OT - call for help in TX
> From: Heather_Hayes@roundrockisd.org
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 13:08:22 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> I am helping to organize an art festival designed to benefit a group
> of refugees from Burma living in Austin. They're from a tribe that
> has a strong tradition of weaving, and they make beautiful handbags
> and related items.
>
> Anyway, part of the festival is gathering up other things sold by
> fair trade/charity type groups. We've lined up some paper bead
> jewelry made by women in Uganda, and possibly another group in
> Central America that helps kids leave gangs.
>
> Does anyone know of a fair trade arts/craft type of group that might
> want to participate in this? I know of 10,000 Villages, but they're
> too big and incorporated to join in on our festival.
>
> If you have any ideas for me, PLEASE EMAIL ME OFF-LIST!!! I don't
> want to clog up this list with unrelated posts.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Heather in TX
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: robin phillips <robinmcp@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
>
>
> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>
> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start a
preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the teacher
to get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped
for one 40 minute class a week.  These 4 year olds will have a full day
because there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to do
two half day sessions.  I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise
choice for any 4 year old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I
will have the option of going to their classroom or having them come to
mine - right now I'm planning to go there (no bathroom facilities in my
room), but I'd love to hear your thoghts on this.  Any help will be
appreciated - lessons, activities, etc.  I am having a hard time getting
excited about taking on an 8th prep!
> Looking forward to your feedback
>
> Robin in PA
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 23:18:55 +0000
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
>
>
> Hi Robin
>
>
>  If you are in a public school I would recommend that you go to your
union rep, and ask if this is possible. If your contract allows the 8th
prep without additional compensation or without some other
consideration, make sure it is written in for next time.  Our contract
pays if you have to teach an additional prep (and while money isn't the
only consideration, because time is a very valuable commodity, the money
makes BOE think twice before just thrusting extra preps on teachers).
Our contract also pays you if you have to "cover" a class during your
preparation period or during your duty period.
>
>
>
>
>
>  That said....
>
>
>
>
>
>  I would speak to the teacher and ask HER what she feels you should
accomplish with these 4 year olds as she should be an expert on that age
level and their energy,attention and interest levels.
>
>
>
>
>
>  San D
>
>> From: robinmcp@hotmail.com
>> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help! new preschool assignment
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
>>
>>
>>
>> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>>
>> Help! I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
preschoolers in about 2 weeks! Our school received a grant to start a
preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the teacher
to get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped
for one 40 minute class a week. These 4 year olds will have a full day
because there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to do
two half day sessions. I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise choice
for any 4 year old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I will have
the option of going to their classroom or having them come to mine -
right now I'm planning to go there (no bathroom facilities in my room),
but I'd love to hear your thoghts on this. Any help will be appreciated
- lessons, activities, etc. I am having a hard time getting excited
about taking on an 8th prep!
>> Looking forward to your feedback
>>
>> Robin in PA
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: "familyerickson" <familyerickson@cox.net>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:26:35 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Here's some things that worked for me with 3 year olds:
> purple crayon drawing based on the book   Harold and the Purple Crayon
> marble painting   show picture of Jackson Pollock
> circle printing with all kinds of lids, corks (use both empty circles
and
> filled in circles)
> ziplock baggies - squirt in red tempera in one corner, yellow in
another
> children massage and discover orange
> blue collage (construction pap., wrapping pap., magazine pages---all
blue)
> show pictures from Picasso's blue period
> playdough day - use the Crayola brand - learn to make balls, snakes,
> pancakes
> colored sand painting - can buy at walmart - do it on scraps of
matteboard
> covered with glue - teach them to use pincher fingers
> painting with matchbox cars
> paint with only pastel colors on pastel paper with q-tips
>
> Buy Mary Ann Kohls books   www.brightring.com
>
> Hope this helps.
> Cindy
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: robin phillips [mailto:robinmcp@hotmail.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 6:08 PM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help! new preschool assignment
>
>
>
>
> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>
> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
> preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start a
> preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the
teacher to
> get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped
for one
> 40 minute class a week.  These 4 year olds will have a full day
because
> there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to do two
half day
> sessions.  I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise choice for any 4
year
> old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I will have the option of
going
> to their classroom or having them come to mine - right now I'm
planning to
> go there (no bathroom facilities in my room), but I'd love to hear
your
> thoghts on this.  Any help will be appreciated - lessons, activities,
etc.
> I am having a hard time getting excited about taking on an 8th prep!
> Looking forward to your feedback
>
> Robin in PA
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!55
> 0F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.17/1655 - Release Date:
9/5/2008
> 7:05 PM
>
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.17/1655 - Release Date:
9/5/2008
> 7:05 PM
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 21:09:05 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> On Wed 10/09/08  7:07 PM , robin phillips robinmcp@hotmail.com sent:
>
>> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group
>> of 20 preschoolers in about 2 weeks!
>
________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
> I teach a group of 30 (split into 2 classes) of "Young Fives"
(basically pre-K or developmental K) for 40 minutes on a rotating
> schedule. They are a challenging, but very creative group of kiddos!
Be aware that many of them will not be able to hold a pair of
> scissors let alone write their own names. That being said, don't be
afraid to challenge them by introducing the elements &
> principles even at this young age! We talk about artists, listen to
music, read books- anything that may inspire creativity. I
> have found that if I break my lessons down into several smaller steps,
they tend not to get bored as easily. For instance, 10
> minutes of drawing followed by 10 minutes of cutting, finished by 10
minutes of gluing.
>
> Often, I send home a letter at the beginning of the year to the
parents explaining that at this age, art is more about the
> experience rather than the finished product, so they should not be
worried if their "Little Picasso" brings home something that is
> unrecognizable because they are definitely being creative. I also am
sure to post a sign at our annual art show that says "It's
> the Process, Not the Product!"
>
> You can see some of my students' artwork here:
> Primary Lines:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=88578
>
> Secondary Shapes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=88638
>
> Magic Glue Windows:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=98408
>
> Kandinsky Colors:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=108467
>
> Joseph Cornell Boxes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=81558
>
> Joan Miro Dreamscapes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=67640
>
> If you want to see more, follow the link below, in my signature. :)
> Good luck!!
>
> Denise Pannell
>
> http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=36837
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Teaching to Observe
> From: "Chantal Pinnow" <cpinnow@yisseoul.org>
> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 14:47:15 +0900
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
>
>
>  Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
> see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class was
doing an
> observation painting of their open lockers. I got very frustrated with
kids
> who after a couple of days, didn't even have their locker open or
wouldn't
> rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on the first day.
Their
> answer was always "I know what it looks like." My question is "How do
you do
> an observation drawing if you aren't observing anything?" I understand
that
> some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are doing
observation
> paintings.
>
> I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what
something
> looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may notice
things
> are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just left and I
was a
> bit frustrated with them.
> Chantal
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
shannonpultz@gmail.com
leave-551442-225073.43cd8f7b9d268200decb3136f4336894@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
From: "Shannon Pultz" <shannonpultz@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 04:56:18 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5
Correction: Am NOW  seeking out other directions to gather informantion
On Thu, Sep 11, 2008 at 4:54 AM, Shannon Pultz <shannonpultz@gmail.com>
wrote:
> Dear All,
>
> I am putting together a thesis problem/proposal for the M Ed and would
> very much appreciate any ideas. I've had difficulty thus far finding
> peer-reviewed studies on the topic and am NOW seeking out other
> directions to gather information.
>
> I teach 9-12 at Pittsburgh's High School for Creative and Performing
Arts.
> The district has decided to merge the high school with our arts magnet
> 6-8 "feeder" school. Starting next academic year we will have 6-12 in
> the same building.
>
> Currently, there is no curriculum at either school. Our department
> coordinator has suggested we put one in place.
>
> My thesis concerns visual art curriculum design and content for the
> gifted and talented in a 6-12 school setting.
>
> Any ideas on where to research, suggestions of art teachers to speak
> to, districts with similar strong visual art focus, etc. would be
> greatly appreciated.
>
> THANKS!
> Shannon
>
> On Thu, Sep 11, 2008 at 1:00 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
>> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, September 10, 2008.
>>
>> 1. Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> 2. loose graphite
>> 3. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> 4. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> 5. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> 6. A bit OT - call for help in TX
>> 7. Help!  new preschool assignment
>> 8. RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
>> 9. RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
>> 10. Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
>> 11. Teaching to Observe
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 05:44:55 -0400
>> X-Message-Number: 1
>>
>> I think the custodian is being unreasonable.  If you don't want to
>> clean, don't get a job cleaning!  I'm sure you do all you can to keep
>> it contained, and it's not like you're always leaving messes for him
>> to clean up.  It sounds like the VP realizes he's being unreasonable,
>> too.
>>
>> I didn't know about the sticky mat.  That's a neat idea.
>>
>> Other than that, the only thing I could think of would be to keep a
>> swiffer or something around and don't let the kids walk out until
>> you've swiffer'd.  Maybe even have them remove their shoes and keep
>> them by the classroom door, so that the stuff doesn't get onto the
>> shoes and tracked out of the classroom.  If that doesn't make him
>> happy, he's probably determined not to be and there isn't much you
can
>> do about it.
>>
>> -b-
>>
>>
>>
>> On Tue, Sep 9, 2008 at 10:37 PM, Betty B
<bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>>>
>>> I decided several things, like -loose graphite is awesome, and the
difference it made in this project is worth the trouble. It helped my
kids loosen up, their drawings look freer and more relaxed.
>>>
>>> The vice-principal called me at home tonight about this, and wanted
to know what they could buy me to help. They are trying to be helpful
and are not trying to get me to not use these projects. (She told me the
same custodian used to yell at her for using glitter) My actual
classroom custodian is awesome, and is not the least bit bothered, its
just the guy in the cafeteria. I guess I am just embarassed that this
was my first real interaction with the new principal.
>>>
>>> sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in
the room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
and not let it leak into the hall.
>>>
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> Carpe You Some Diem!
>> Website: http://www.rebeccaburch.com
>> Store: http://carpeyousomediem.etsy.com
>> Network: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccaburch
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: loose graphite
>> From: Pam Wellington <loveart@hotmail.com>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 10:56:42 -0400
>> X-Message-Number: 2
>>
>>
>> Dear Betty,
>> When I use charcoal I give the students a dust pan and have them
sweep all the  looose charcoal which is on the table and any that landed
on the floor into the pan and into the trash.  HOWEVER, you never, ever
need to apologize for making a mess in the art room!  Don't ever
apologize to anyone for it!  Art classes are MESSY. The job of the
custodian is to CLEAN.  That is what he/she gets PAID to do.  It is
rediculous for any administrator to even give an ear to any custodian
complaining about having to clean up a legitimate mess made in any room!
But ART?!  Don't let it get to you.  The custodian who complained is the
one who should be in trouble, not you!  As long as the mess is
reasonable, not deliberate or over the top.
>> Pam Wellington
>> Art Dept. Chair
>> Boiling Springs H.S
>> Boiling Springs,Pa
>>
>>
>>> Subject: loose graphite/charcoal management
>>> From: Betty B
>>> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2008 13:16:18 -0700 (PDT)
>>> X-Message-Number: 2
>>>
>>> Before the school year started, I found my first-year journal, and I
wrote about how, when I did charcoal, the custodian told other teachers
she would quit if they didn't get rid of me. Well, it is 8 years later
and I haven't done charcoal or loose graphite since.
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> From: "Peshette, Alix" <apeshette@placercoe.k12.ca.us>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 09:30:12 -0700
>> X-Message-Number: 3
>>
>> Betty,
>> I'm glad to hear that the vice-principal called wanting to solve the
>> problem with better equipment.  Like Ken, I don't know what loose
>> graphite and charcoal are, but I can guess at the set-up and cleaning
>> issues.  Some thoughts that come to mind are:
>>
>> Like glitter (I laughed out loud about your vice-principal's comments
on
>> her glitter use), maybe the students need to be working in an
>> environment that has an edge - like inside the lid of a paper box.
This
>> way the graphite will have more containment.
>>
>> If this stuff has a tendency to be somewhat airborne, maybe it needs
to
>> be used in what would be a "spray painting booth."  One can build one
>> these with PVC pipe and fittings (no glue so that it can be
>> disassembled) and a roll of plastic sheeting from the local hardware
big
>> box store.  The booth can sit on a table top or be a full-size
walk-in.
>>
>>
>> I totally appreciate the conundrum of messy art and custodians.  I
once
>> did a three-week paper mache skeleton project for Dia de Los Muertos
>> with 7th graders in a portable classroom that had carpeting.  The
>> students' skeletons were fabulous, but the room was never quite the
>> same!  LOL!  I was also very, very, very nice to my custodian for the
>> rest of my time in that classroom!
>>
>> -Alix
>> (former junior high art teacher)
>>
>>
>> Alix E. Peshette
>> Instructional Technology Coordinator
>> Placer County Office of Education
>> 360 Nevada St.
>> Auburn, CA.  95603  USA
>> 530-889-5976
>> apeshette@placercoe.k12.ca.us
>> http://www.placercoe.k12.ca.us
>> Blog: http://www.k12hsn.org/edzone/blogs.php/alixpeshette/
>> http://del.icio.us/artfully
>>
>> "Technology - opening minds with a new set of keys"
>>
>> NOTICE: This e-mail message, including any attachments, is for the
sole
>> use of the intended recipient or recipients and may contain
confidential
>> and/or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient
or
>> agent thereof, be advised that you have received this e-mail in error
>> and any use, dissemination, disclosure, forwarding, printing,
copying,
>> or any action taken in reliance on the contents of this e-mail is
>> strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error,
please
>> notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail and delete the original
>> message, attachments, and all copies of the original message from
your
>> system.
>>
>> Please note that any views and/or opinions presented in this e-mail
are
>> solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of
the
>> Placer County Office of Education.
>>
>> Finally, the recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments
for
>> the presence of viruses. Although the Placer County Office of
Education
>> has taken reasonable precautions to ensure no viruses are present in
>> this e-mail, it accepts no liability for any loss or damage arising
from
>> the use of this e-mail or attachments.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Betty B [mailto:bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net]
>> Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 7:38 PM
>> Subject: Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
>>
>> I decided several things, like -loose graphite is awesome, and the
>> difference it made in this project is worth the trouble. It helped my
>> kids loosen up, their drawings look freer and more relaxed.
>>
>> The vice-principal called me at home tonight about this, and wanted
to
>> know what they could buy me to help. They are trying to be helpful
and
>> are not trying to get me to not use these projects. (She told me the
>> same custodian used to yell at her for using glitter) My actual
>> classroom custodian is awesome, and is not the least bit bothered,
its
>> just the guy in the cafeteria. I guess I am just embarassed that this
>> was my first real interaction with the new principal.
>>
>> sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
>> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
and
>> not let it leak into the hall.
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 12:41:17 -0400
>> X-Message-Number: 4
>>
>>
>> "sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in
the
>> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
and
>> not let it leak into the hall."
>>
>> And that's the wonder and beauty of it all.
>> Jan in Tampa
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 10:12:43 -0700 (PDT)
>> X-Message-Number: 5
>>
>> For those of you who don't use loose graphite - it is
>> General's Graphite, "since 1889" I'll post some photos of finished
pieces later.
>>
>> It has gone ok so far today, telling the kids no more graphite, but
one troubled young man who loves art, and had an excellent drawing, just
totally shut down, as there was "no point" in going on. The others who
were behind were fine with using the ebony pencils. He put his drawing
in the trash and just sat staring unblinking all hour, tearing little
notecards up into tiny bits, which is what he does when stressed.
>> So managing to not cry was my big accomplishment, but I did take his
drawing out of the trash and tomorrow hopefully they will have the
"carpenters felt" they think will work, and he can do it then.
>>
>>
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: A bit OT - call for help in TX
>> From: Heather_Hayes@roundrockisd.org
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 13:08:22 -0500
>> X-Message-Number: 6
>>
>> I am helping to organize an art festival designed to benefit a group
>> of refugees from Burma living in Austin. They're from a tribe that
>> has a strong tradition of weaving, and they make beautiful handbags
>> and related items.
>>
>> Anyway, part of the festival is gathering up other things sold by
>> fair trade/charity type groups. We've lined up some paper bead
>> jewelry made by women in Uganda, and possibly another group in
>> Central America that helps kids leave gangs.
>>
>> Does anyone know of a fair trade arts/craft type of group that might
>> want to participate in this? I know of 10,000 Villages, but they're
>> too big and incorporated to join in on our festival.
>>
>> If you have any ideas for me, PLEASE EMAIL ME OFF-LIST!!! I don't
>> want to clog up this list with unrelated posts.
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>> Heather in TX
>>
>>
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: Help!  new preschool assignment
>> From: robin phillips <robinmcp@hotmail.com>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
>> X-Message-Number: 7
>>
>>
>>
>> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>>
>> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of
20 preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start
a preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the
teacher to get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being
tapped for one 40 minute class a week.  These 4 year olds will have a
full day because there isn't enough money in the budget for
transportation to do two half day sessions.  I cannot imagine that a
full day is a wise choice for any 4 year old.... but that's how it's
going to happen! I will have the option of going to their classroom or
having them come to mine - right now I'm planning to go there (no
bathroom facilities in my room), but I'd love to hear your thoghts on
this.  Any help will be appreciated - lessons, activities, etc.  I am
having a hard time getting excited about taking on an 8th prep!
>> Looking forward to your feedback
>>
>> Robin in PA
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
>> From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 23:18:55 +0000
>> X-Message-Number: 8
>>
>>
>>
>> Hi Robin
>>
>>
>>  If you are in a public school I would recommend that you go to your
union rep, and ask if this is possible. If your contract allows the 8th
prep without additional compensation or without some other
consideration, make sure it is written in for next time.  Our contract
pays if you have to teach an additional prep (and while money isn't the
only consideration, because time is a very valuable commodity, the money
makes BOE think twice before just thrusting extra preps on teachers).
Our contract also pays you if you have to "cover" a class during your
preparation period or during your duty period.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>  That said....
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>  I would speak to the teacher and ask HER what she feels you should
accomplish with these 4 year olds as she should be an expert on that age
level and their energy,attention and interest levels.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>  San D
>>
>>> From: robinmcp@hotmail.com
>>> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
>>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help! new preschool assignment
>>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>>>
>>> Help! I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of
20 preschoolers in about 2 weeks! Our school received a grant to start a
preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the teacher
to get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped
for one 40 minute class a week. These 4 year olds will have a full day
because there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to do
two half day sessions. I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise choice
for any 4 year old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I will have
the option of going to their classroom or having them come to mine -
right now I'm planning to go there (no bathroom facilities in my room),
but I'd love to hear your thoghts on this. Any help will be appreciated
- lessons, activities, etc. I am having a hard time getting excited
about taking on an 8th prep!
>>> Looking forward to your feedback
>>>
>>> Robin in PA
>>>
>>> _________________________________________________________________
>>> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>>>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
>> From: "familyerickson" <familyerickson@cox.net>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:26:35 -0500
>> X-Message-Number: 9
>>
>> Here's some things that worked for me with 3 year olds:
>> purple crayon drawing based on the book   Harold and the Purple
Crayon
>> marble painting   show picture of Jackson Pollock
>> circle printing with all kinds of lids, corks (use both empty circles
and
>> filled in circles)
>> ziplock baggies - squirt in red tempera in one corner, yellow in
another
>> children massage and discover orange
>> blue collage (construction pap., wrapping pap., magazine pages---all
blue)
>> show pictures from Picasso's blue period
>> playdough day - use the Crayola brand - learn to make balls, snakes,
>> pancakes
>> colored sand painting - can buy at walmart - do it on scraps of
matteboard
>> covered with glue - teach them to use pincher fingers
>> painting with matchbox cars
>> paint with only pastel colors on pastel paper with q-tips
>>
>> Buy Mary Ann Kohls books   www.brightring.com
>>
>> Hope this helps.
>> Cindy
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: robin phillips [mailto:robinmcp@hotmail.com]
>> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 6:08 PM
>> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help! new preschool assignment
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>>
>> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of
20
>> preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start
a
>> preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the
teacher to
>> get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped
for one
>> 40 minute class a week.  These 4 year olds will have a full day
because
>> there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to do two
half day
>> sessions.  I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise choice for any
4 year
>> old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I will have the option
of going
>> to their classroom or having them come to mine - right now I'm
planning to
>> go there (no bathroom facilities in my room), but I'd love to hear
your
>> thoghts on this.  Any help will be appreciated - lessons, activities,
etc.
>> I am having a hard time getting excited about taking on an 8th prep!
>> Looking forward to your feedback
>>
>> Robin in PA
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!55
>> 0F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>> No virus found in this incoming message.
>> Checked by AVG.
>> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.17/1655 - Release Date:
9/5/2008
>> 7:05 PM
>>
>> No virus found in this outgoing message.
>> Checked by AVG.
>> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.17/1655 - Release Date:
9/5/2008
>> 7:05 PM
>>
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
>> From: Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 21:09:05 -0400
>> X-Message-Number: 10
>>
>> On Wed 10/09/08  7:07 PM , robin phillips robinmcp@hotmail.com sent:
>>
>>> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group
>>> of 20 preschoolers in about 2 weeks!
>>
________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
>> I teach a group of 30 (split into 2 classes) of "Young Fives"
(basically pre-K or developmental K) for 40 minutes on a rotating
>> schedule. They are a challenging, but very creative group of kiddos!
Be aware that many of them will not be able to hold a pair of
>> scissors let alone write their own names. That being said, don't be
afraid to challenge them by introducing the elements &
>> principles even at this young age! We talk about artists, listen to
music, read books- anything that may inspire creativity. I
>> have found that if I break my lessons down into several smaller
steps, they tend not to get bored as easily. For instance, 10
>> minutes of drawing followed by 10 minutes of cutting, finished by 10
minutes of gluing.
>>
>> Often, I send home a letter at the beginning of the year to the
parents explaining that at this age, art is more about the
>> experience rather than the finished product, so they should not be
worried if their "Little Picasso" brings home something that is
>> unrecognizable because they are definitely being creative. I also am
sure to post a sign at our annual art show that says "It's
>> the Process, Not the Product!"
>>
>> You can see some of my students' artwork here:
>> Primary Lines:
>> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=88578
>>
>> Secondary Shapes:
>> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=88638
>>
>> Magic Glue Windows:
>> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=98408
>>
>> Kandinsky Colors:
>> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=108467
>>
>> Joseph Cornell Boxes:
>> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=81558
>>
>> Joan Miro Dreamscapes:
>> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=67640
>>
>> If you want to see more, follow the link below, in my signature. :)
>> Good luck!!
>>
>> Denise Pannell
>>
>> http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=36837
>>
>>
>>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Subject: Teaching to Observe
>> From: "Chantal Pinnow" <cpinnow@yisseoul.org>
>> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 14:47:15 +0900
>> X-Message-Number: 11
>>
>>
>>
>>  Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
>> see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class was
doing an
>> observation painting of their open lockers. I got very frustrated
with kids
>> who after a couple of days, didn't even have their locker open or
wouldn't
>> rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on the first day.
Their
>> answer was always "I know what it looks like." My question is "How do
you do
>> an observation drawing if you aren't observing anything?" I
understand that
>> some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are doing
observation
>> paintings.
>>
>> I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what
something
>> looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may notice
things
>> are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just left and I
was a
>> bit frustrated with them.
>> Chantal
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>>
>> END OF DIGEST
>>
>> ---
shannonpultz@gmail.com
leave-551442-225073.43cd8f7b9d268200decb3136f4336894@lists.pub.getty.edu
>>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Observation in 3D!!
From: BigCrab99@aol.com
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 07:59:41 EDT
X-Message-Number: 6
Some really great ideas have been posted about  teaching kids to draw
from 
observation.  
     For a quick, one day, clay observation lesson for  my middle
schoolers, 
I place a large Snickers bar, with a bite taken out (by  me!!), on a
banding 
wheel in the middle of each table.  The kids are given  a small piece of
clay 
and a few modeling tools.  They are challenged to  mold, model, and form
the 
clay to look as much like the Snickers bar as  possible.  As they work,
I point 
out and ask questions to encourage them to  observe even more closely.  
Sometimes, an unbiased judge will select 5 or 6  of the best bars to be
treated to a 
Snickers bar.  There are bite size bars  for the rest.  Sometimes I use
this 
as an introductory lesson or at the end  for kids who finish a clay
project 
early.
Unfortunately, offering rewards for the best really motivates middle  
schoolers.  I'm not sure if it is a good idea, but it works.  At least
all kids who 
tried were rewarded in some way.
 
**************Psssst...Have you heard the news? There's a new fashion
blog, 
plus the latest fall trends and hair styles at StyleList.com.      
(http://www.stylelist.com/trends?ncid=aolsty00050000000014)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Observation in 3D!!
From: Sharon <sharon@art-rageous.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 09:31:33 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7
Sounds like a great idea!  Only thing I'd caution is avoiding any type
of candy with peanuts, due to potential allergies. :-)
On Thu, Sep 11, 2008 at 7:59 AM,  <BigCrab99@aol.com> wrote:
> Some really great ideas have been posted about  teaching kids to draw
from
> observation.
>     For a quick, one day, clay observation lesson for  my middle
schoolers,
> I place a large Snickers bar, with a bite taken out (by  me!!), on a
banding
> wheel in the middle of each table.  The kids are given  a small piece
of clay
> and a few modeling tools.  They are challenged to  mold, model, and
form the
> clay to look as much like the Snickers bar as  possible.  As they
work, I point
> out and ask questions to encourage them to  observe even more closely.
> Sometimes, an unbiased judge will select 5 or 6  of the best bars to
be treated to a
> Snickers bar.  There are bite size bars  for the rest.  Sometimes I
use this
> as an introductory lesson or at the end  for kids who finish a clay
project
> early.
> Unfortunately, offering rewards for the best really motivates middle
> schoolers.  I'm not sure if it is a good idea, but it works.  At least
all kids who
> tried were rewarded in some way.
.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
-- 
Sharon
www.art-rageous.net
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
From: Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 07:15:35 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8
I served as the grievance chair of my teachers union, and I successfully
defended a group of fellow specialists who were being told they would
have to take on a group of pre-school special needs students (autistic)
without additional compensation and cutting into their contractual
planning time.  The way this case was won was on several fronts:  ALL
teachers, K-5, were guaranteed the same planning time in the contract,
the teachers were contracted to teach K-5, not pK through 5, and some of
the students in the autistic program were 2 years old!  This was not
only a violation of the contract, it was outside the range of expertise
of the teacher's certification, something that was also addressed in the
contract.  Never underestimate the power of good contract language!
If you have a good working knowledge of your contract language, put it
to work for you--that is what contracts are for.  If language doesn't
exist, start pushing the union to get it in there, or serve as a
negotiator yourself to make sure it does.  If you choose to not be
proactive, it is likely you will continue to be less of an art educator
and more of a planning time provider.  It's your choice.
      
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Teaching to Observe
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 08:50:23 -0600
X-Message-Number: 9
I'm sure you will get lots of good advice - but my two cents is:
Always start with a very simple object so they won't be distracted
by clutter. When they start to draw "what they see" then add additional
items. But insist that they ignore everything but the one item they
are drawing before tackling the next. When I have students draw
a vase of flowers I insist that the work on one shape (leaf or
pedal) at a time - then moving to the adjacent shape. Do read
Dr. Betty Edwards "Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain".
It's chock full of logical steps to teach observational drawing
skills.
						Woody
On Sep 10, 2008, at 11:47 PM, Chantal Pinnow wrote:
>
>
>  Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they  
> ACTUALLY
> see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class was  
> doing an
> observation painting of their open lockers. I got very frustrated  
> with kids
> who after a couple of days, didn't even have their locker open or  
> wouldn't
> rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on the first  
> day. Their
> answer was always "I know what it looks like." My question is "How  
> do you do
> an observation drawing if you aren't observing anything?" I  
> understand that
> some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are doing  
> observation
> paintings.
>
> I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what  
> something
> looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may  
> notice things
> are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just left and I  
> was a
> bit frustrated with them.
> Chantal
>
Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
Read My Blog:
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/September.html
Watercolors on Note Cards
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Teaching to Observe
From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 08:52:01 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 10
That is a really good lesson and I wish I was teaching still so that I
could use it.  I am signing up to Sub this year and I might bring these
items to a class and do it if things are right.
thanks,
Ken Schwab
San Jose, CA
--- On Thu, 9/11/08, Sharon <sharon@art-rageous.net> wrote:
> From: Sharon <sharon@art-rageous.net>
> Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] Teaching to Observe
> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Date: Thursday, September 11, 2008, 3:13 AM
> The second day of school I put the words
> "Observation", "Imagination"
> and "Memory" on the board and had the kids give
> me definitions and
> tell me the differences between them.  They concluded that
> memory and
> imagination are related because if you can't remember
> all the details
> of something, imagination takes over.
> 
> Then I had them divide a piece of sketchbook paper in half.
>  On the
> top half, I had them draw a piece of popcorn from memory. 
> On the
> bottom half, I asked them to draw a circle and then turn it
> into an
> M&M.  (Some kids' memories were pretty good and
> they got the font
> correct.)  For good measure, I then had them draw, from
> memory, the
> M&M cartoon characters.
> 
> I had them flip their papers over as I passed out napkins,
> gave them
> popcorn and small snack size packages of M&Ms and had
> them draw from
> observation.  Of course their observational drawings were
> much more
> realistic.
> 
> Might not be practical with large classes, but whenever I
> can involve
> food (I've also used popcorn and Oreos or other
> familiar candy like
> Hershey Kisses) I can usually get their attention.  :-)
> 
> 
> 
> On Thu, Sep 11, 2008 at 1:47 AM, Chantal Pinnow
> <cpinnow@yisseoul.org> wrote:
> >
> >
> >  Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw
> what they ACTUALLY
> > see, not just what they think they know it looks like?
> My class was doing an
> > observation painting of their open lockers. I got very
> frustrated with kids
> > who after a couple of days, didn't even have their
> locker open or wouldn't
> > rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on
> the first day. Their
> > answer was always "I know what it looks
> like." My question is "How do you do
> > an observation drawing if you aren't observing
> anything?" I understand that
> > some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are
> doing observation
> > paintings.
> >
> > I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you
> know what something
> > looks like, but when you actually take time to observe
> you may notice things
> > are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class
> just left and I was a
> > bit frustrated with them.
> > Chantal
> 
> -- 
> Sharon
> www.art-rageous.net
> 
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to 
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Teaching to Observe
From: <Laura.Drietz@k12.sd.us>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 11:07:52 -0500
X-Message-Number: 11
A couple things I have done:
Drawing "puzzles" (this is an activity I always have available to have
students work on if they finish projects early.) I take pictures and cut
them into squares. Number the pieces, then mix them up. They re-create
the picture by drawing it piece by piece, they won't know what the
picture is until they get their "puzzle" put together by drawing all the
boxes. This idea I took from the book "Learning to Draw Lifeline
Portraits from Photographs" by Lee Hammond. It taught ME so much when I
did the activity in her book that I modified it for my students. It
works at every grade level, just make pictures more difficult, cut it
into more pieces, etc.
Another I do is for when we do portrait drawing. I have students draw a
"generic" face from memory. Then a "real person" from memory, and
finally, draw a real person from either a picture or by looking at them.
They are amazed when they notice how important it is to look at what you
are drawing. We do a lot of discussion on how different the "generic"
person looks from the final "real" person. And how there really isn't a
specific shape that works for any part of the human face, you have to
observe how each element is different on the particular person you are
drawing.
Also, drawing a picture upside down is always good to develop
observation skills. You can't just draw upside down from memory, you
have to look at it carefully.
Laura Drietz
Art Teacher
Brookings Middle School
E-mail laura.drietz@k12.sd.us
-----Original Message-----
From: Chantal Pinnow [mailto:cpinnow@yisseoul.org]
Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2008 12:47 AM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Teaching to Observe
 Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class
was doing an observation painting of their open lockers. I got very
frustrated with kids who after a couple of days, didn't even have their
locker open or wouldn't rearrange their books the same way as they drew
it on the first day. Their answer was always "I know what it looks
like." My question is "How do you do an observation drawing if you
aren't observing anything?" I understand that some artwork is from
memory or imagination, but we are doing observation paintings.
I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what
something looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may
notice things are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just
left and I was a bit frustrated with them.
Chantal
---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: 9 - 11 Art on My Blog
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 12:44:47 -0600
X-Message-Number: 12
Today is a day to remember all those brave men and women who lost  
their lives trying to save others
in New York, Washington DC, and in the air over Pennsylvania. Please  
remember the thousands of
innocents who died in that senseless act seven years ago. I was  
teaching when it happened and the
news hit our middle school hard. I dealt with it the next day by  
having my students do visual examples
of the words that described the things they hold dear. We put up a  
showcase around the concept of
just lighting that "one little candle." I wanted my students to  
consider those things that were most
important to them - rather than talk about hate and revenge.
	
Woody
On my blog for 9/11/08 - I posted images of the art my students  
created in response to 9/11:
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/September.html
I'm a product of the 60's and my liberal bias was imposed upon my  
students right after that
terrible act. The way we choose to teach others to heal is a  
reflection of our values as teachers.
Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
Read My Blog:
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/September.html
Watercolors on Note Cards
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: teaching to observe
From: robin phillips <robinmcp@hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 15:14:33 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13
Chantal,
I'm not sure what age level you are refering to.  All of my students in
grades 3-6 do a 5 minute drawing in their sketchbooks upon entering the
room.  This segment of "Silent Sustained Sketching" is based purely on
observation.  One technique I use is a viewfinder, to "frame" the still
life objects so that they can see how the shapes relate to the edges of
the paper.  Students are instructed to keep their heads still so that
the view doesn't change.  We practice every class and I add techniques
each year as they progress.  Blind contour line drawing and upside down
drawing help them to be more observant.  After discussions about the
picture plane, I also use sheets of plexiglass and dry erase markers and
let them trace the setup of the still life when they are having a hard
time with it.  Sometimes, just that will give them a deeper
understanding of how a line "goes". By 6th grade I cut apart a photo and
they each draw an unidentifiable piece and we put it together.  They are
amazed at themselves and by this time agree with me that drawing truly
does begin with "SEE"!  Then we tackle a self portrait and the results
are always awesome.  By the way, when someone insists that drawing from
their imagination is what some of the famous artists do, I break out my
Picasso power point with some of his early portraits and let them see
that he was a MASTER at observation before he progressed into his cubist
period!
Good luck and keep them drawing!
Robin in PA
_________________________________________________________________
Want to do more with Windows Live? Learn 10 hidden secrets from Jamie.
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Teaching to Observe
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 12:23:20 -0700
X-Message-Number: 14
Why don't you pick something that they are totally unfamiliar with so
that they really
have to keep looking.  Their locker is too familiar.
>>> "Chantal Pinnow" <cpinnow@yisseoul.org> 9/10/2008 10:47 pm >>>
 Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class was
doing an
observation painting of their open lockers. I got very frustrated with
kids
who after a couple of days, didn't even have their locker open or
wouldn't
rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on the first day.
Their
answer was always "I know what it looks like." My question is "How do
you do
an observation drawing if you aren't observing anything?" I understand
that
some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are doing observation
paintings.
I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what
something
looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may notice
things
are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just left and I was
a
bit frustrated with them.
Chantal
---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
-*Scanned by ECSD GWAVA*-
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Re:teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
From: "Dulcius" <dulcius@mailnew.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 17:23:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15
Hi Shannon,
I work at Toledo School for the Arts, which is 6-12th grade.  If you are
interested, I believe the school is in the process of putting together a
curriculum package that others could use.  Look up the website if you
are 
interested, and to get contact information.  It is: www.ts4arts.org.
-Lydia in Toledo
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Shannon Pultz" <shannonpultz@gmail.com>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2008 7:54 AM
Subject: Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September
10, 
2008
> Dear All,
>
> I am putting together a thesis problem/proposal for the M Ed and would
> very much appreciate any ideas. I've had difficulty thus far finding
> peer-reviewed studies on the topic and am not seeking out other
> directions to gather information.
>
> I teach 9-12 at Pittsburgh's High School for Creative and Performing
Arts.
> The district has decided to merge the high school with our arts magnet
> 6-8 "feeder" school. Starting next academic year we will have 6-12 in
> the same building.
>
> Currently, there is no curriculum at either school. Our department
> coordinator has suggested we put one in place.
>
> My thesis concerns visual art curriculum design and content for the
> gifted and talented in a 6-12 school setting.
>
> Any ideas on where to research, suggestions of art teachers to speak
> to, districts with similar strong visual art focus, etc. would be
> greatly appreciated.
>
> THANKS!
> Shannon
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Subject: Teaching to Observe
From: Boots13@aol.com
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 18:18:14 EDT
X-Message-Number: 16
I make sure my students are sitting directly in front of what they are  
drawing.
I also have a list of "Observational Drawing Cmmmandments" on chart
paper 
that I made and we went over, like looking at the object 80% and looking
"down" 
20%, etc. They do detailed contour drawings of their book-bags on  
mini-easels on the desk. 
They find that when I walk around and say "where is  that in your
bookbag?" 
or "where is that in your drawing?" 
Not sure if this  helped......
Does anyone have a handout that might help introduce shading? What are
the  
best artists to use as reference?
 
Thanks!!
terri
 
**************Psssst...Have you heard the news? There's a new fashion
blog, 
plus the latest fall trends and hair styles at StyleList.com.      
(http://www.stylelist.com/trends?ncid=aolsty00050000000014)
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Subject: Teaching to Observe
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 16:51:34 -0600
X-Message-Number: 17
On Sep 11, 2008, at 4:18 PM, Boots13@aol.com wrote:
> I make sure my students are sitting directly in front of what they  
> are  drawing.
> I also have a list of "Observational Drawing Cmmmandments" on  
> chart  paper
> that I made and we went over, like looking at the object 80% and  
> looking  "down"
> 20%, etc.
I would add that they should not move their eyes from the original  
position they
began observing/drawing from. Any move higher, lower or to the side  
will shift
the relationship of any lines in relation to each other. Of course  
they should
never move the object they are drawing. This is always an issue when  
more
than one student is drawing the same object. I try to get them to  
copy the lines,
ie edges they see before them - trying never to think about what the  
object is
so they are using only the right brain. Silence during these drawing  
lessons
is important. Words will trigger the left brain. If you play music at  
some point
be sure there are no lyrics. I preferred jazz or Native American  
flute music.
Good observational drawing is simply copying what you see before you.
In the Renaissance, artists traced the 3-D world before them on a  
sheet of
glass keeping their point of view constant by resting their face  
against a
brace attached to the sheet of glass. This kept them from moving their
eyes. Also, you might suggest that students draw with one eye closed
to restrict binocular vision.
					Good Luck, Woody
Do stress that you are teaching them how to see rather than how to draw.
> They do detailed contour drawings of their book-bags on
> mini-easels on the desk.
> They find that when I walk around and say "where is  that in your  
> bookbag?"
> or "where is that in your drawing?"
> Not sure if this  helped......
> Does anyone have a handout that might help introduce shading? What  
> are the
> best artists to use as reference?
>
> Thanks!!
> terri
>
>
>
>
> **************Psssst...Have you heard the news? There's a new  
> fashion blog,
> plus the latest fall trends and hair styles at StyleList.com.
> (http://www.stylelist.com/trends?ncid=aolsty00050000000014)
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
Read My Blog:
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/September.html
Watercolors on Note Cards
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
January 19, 2009 Be Patience America
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Subject: shading
From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 22:53:20 +0000
X-Message-Number: 18
I approach shading like the photographers Ansel Adams and Edward Weston
did, through the Zone system. I have each student do a value scale (10
steps from white to black). They keep the value scale and when we do our
first drawing they are told that all 10 values must be evident in their
finished drawings. I then give them a lightbulb which they place on a
white piece of paper. They draw the lightbulb, and 'shade' it using all
10 values. As for the "act of shading" I do not allow my students to
smear with their finger, or use a tortillion stump, they must manipulate
their pencils on the paper for the values, alone. As a class we talk
about light sources on the lightbulbs that they each have in front of
them. Then they are charged to draw the lightbulb. I go around and they
hear me say that they can not shade until their drawing is finished.
Once they have established the drawing then they are charged to look for
the "lightest lights, and the darkest darks" and carefully render the
values.
San D
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Teaching to Observe
From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 19:20:51 -0400
X-Message-Number: 19
>Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
>see, not just what they think they know it looks like? . . .
>Chantal
WHY DRAW FROM OBSERVATION?
All people wish they could draw better. Young students who are not given
the secrets of how to learn to observe end up with a crisis of
confidence and lose interest in art. Starting in K and grade 1 helps.
Even though the national standards do not specifically list this skill
(a mistake in my opinion), learning how to learn to observe from the
real things and from the live plants and creatures should be one of the
required learning abilities. First graders learn to read books, but they
often are not taught the skills to read their surroundings. Of course
they should also be encouraged to use their imaginations and experiences
in their artwork.
There have been some excellent responses so far on this list involving
tasting and drawing.  I also agree with much of what Betty Edwards
suggests (except for the copying parts that can easily be done from real
things in the classroom).  Studies have shown the value of multi-sensory
motivation.  Artwork tends to be better and more expressive when more
than vision is involved when observing and experiencing.  Additionally,
given choice of subjects, I suspect that children will be more
responsive to some subjects than others. I ask children to use blinders
for their practice sessions so that they remember not keep looking at
the paper.  After practice, I often allow drawing without blinders, but
remind them to observe (not look at paper) while the pencil is in
motion. I also ask them do air practice prior to actual drawing.
SUBJECT MATTER
To avoid left brain memory drawings (cliche), I agree that we should
select subjects that the student has not previously drawn and for which
there is not a left brain schema. To avoid frustration, it also must be
easy enough. Often a difficult subject can be made easy by asking
students to select a small, but interesting part (student choice using a
viewfinder) from the whole for preliminary practice.
IS IT ART?
Everybody wishes they could draw better, but accurate observation
drawing may or may not be art. Some photography is not art. Some drawing
is largely descriptive and explanatory, and has very little aesthetic,
expressive, interpretive, surrealist, or symbolic qualities. Therefore,
in drawing I try to encourage individual differences based on interests,
passions, troubles, questions, ideas, and even accidents and mistakes.
The best artists who have great observation skills are quite
recognizable because they allow their own signature style to come
through. Mixing observation techniques sometimes works.  Observation
gesture drawing in combination with observation contour drawing is an
example of having to make choices that is more apt to lead to artistic
expression. Art is also produced out of memory (prior experiences) and
from our imaginations.
THESE ARE WEB PAGES WITH OBSERVATION DRAWING LESSONS AND IDEAS:
The skills needed to draw anything (partly taken from a talk by Betty
Edwards):
www.goshen.edu/art/ed/drawingskills.html
I have used rabbits, chickens, pigs, cats, and dogs using blinders. 
www.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/lessons/rabbit.html
Drawing people and portaits.
www.bartelart.com/arted/figure&portrait.html
Drawing as warm-ups.
www.goshen.edu/art/ed/ritual.html
(warm-up list) www.goshen.edu/art/ed/d-list.html
How to adjust the difficulty level.
www.goshen.edu/art/ed/easydraw.html
Shading ideas.
www.goshen.edu/art/ed/shading.html
Viewfinders, on location, mistakes, gesture drawing.
www.goshen.edu/art/ed/draw.html
Viewfinders.
www.goshen.edu/art/ed/westv.html
www.goshen.edu/art/ed/talent.html
Blinders.
www.goshen.edu/art/ed/blindergame.html
 
Cubism as process.
www.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/lessons/cubism.html
Remembering and holding on to what is learned.
www.bartelart.com/arted/transfer.html
A preschooler draws from observation.
www.bartelart.com/orchid.html
Marvin
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
From: "Phyllis Beinart" <beinart@verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 19:39:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 20
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients" 
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Thursday, September 11, 2008 4:00 AM
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, September 10, 2008.
>
> 1. Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 2. loose graphite
> 3. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 4. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 5. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 6. A bit OT - call for help in TX
> 7. Help!  new preschool assignment
> 8. RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 9. RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 10. Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 11. Teaching to Observe
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 05:44:55 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> I think the custodian is being unreasonable.  If you don't want to
> clean, don't get a job cleaning!  I'm sure you do all you can to keep
> it contained, and it's not like you're always leaving messes for him
> to clean up.  It sounds like the VP realizes he's being unreasonable,
> too.
>
> I didn't know about the sticky mat.  That's a neat idea.
>
> Other than that, the only thing I could think of would be to keep a
> swiffer or something around and don't let the kids walk out until
> you've swiffer'd.  Maybe even have them remove their shoes and keep
> them by the classroom door, so that the stuff doesn't get onto the
> shoes and tracked out of the classroom.  If that doesn't make him
> happy, he's probably determined not to be and there isn't much you can
> do about it.
>
> -b-
>
>
>
> On Tue, Sep 9, 2008 at 10:37 PM, Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> wrote:
>>
>> I decided several things, like -loose graphite is awesome, and the 
>> difference it made in this project is worth the trouble. It helped my
>> kids loosen up, their drawings look freer and more relaxed.
>>
>> The vice-principal called me at home tonight about this, and wanted
to 
>> know what they could buy me to help. They are trying to be helpful
and 
>> are not trying to get me to not use these projects. (She told me the
same 
>> custodian used to yell at her for using glitter) My actual classroom 
>> custodian is awesome, and is not the least bit bothered, its just the
guy 
>> in the cafeteria. I guess I am just embarassed that this was my first
>> real interaction with the new principal.
>>
>> sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
>> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
and 
>> not let it leak into the hall.
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> --
> Carpe You Some Diem!
> Website: http://www.rebeccaburch.com
> Store: http://carpeyousomediem.etsy.com
> Network: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccaburch
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: loose graphite
> From: Pam Wellington <loveart@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 10:56:42 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
>
> Dear Betty,
> When I use charcoal I give the students a dust pan and have them sweep
all 
> the  looose charcoal which is on the table and any that landed on the 
> floor into the pan and into the trash.  HOWEVER, you never, ever need
to 
> apologize for making a mess in the art room!  Don't ever apologize to 
> anyone for it!  Art classes are MESSY. The job of the custodian is to 
> CLEAN.  That is what he/she gets PAID to do.  It is rediculous for any
> administrator to even give an ear to any custodian complaining about 
> having to clean up a legitimate mess made in any room!  But ART?!
Don't 
> let it get to you.  The custodian who complained is the one who should
be 
> in trouble, not you!  As long as the mess is reasonable, not
deliberate or 
> over the top.
> Pam Wellington
> Art Dept. Chair
> Boiling Springs H.S
> Boiling Springs,Pa
>
>
>> Subject: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> From: Betty B
>> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2008 13:16:18 -0700 (PDT)
>> X-Message-Number: 2
>>
>> Before the school year started, I found my first-year journal, and I 
>> wrote about how, when I did charcoal, the custodian told other
teachers 
>> she would quit if they didn't get rid of me. Well, it is 8 years
later 
>> and I haven't done charcoal or loose graphite since.
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Peshette, Alix" <apeshette@placercoe.k12.ca.us>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 09:30:12 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Betty,
> I'm glad to hear that the vice-principal called wanting to solve the
> problem with better equipment.  Like Ken, I don't know what loose
> graphite and charcoal are, but I can guess at the set-up and cleaning
> issues.  Some thoughts that come to mind are:
>
> Like glitter (I laughed out loud about your vice-principal's comments
on
> her glitter use), maybe the students need to be working in an
> environment that has an edge - like inside the lid of a paper box.
This
> way the graphite will have more containment.
>
> If this stuff has a tendency to be somewhat airborne, maybe it needs
to
> be used in what would be a "spray painting booth."  One can build one
> these with PVC pipe and fittings (no glue so that it can be
> disassembled) and a roll of plastic sheeting from the local hardware
big
> box store.  The booth can sit on a table top or be a full-size
walk-in.
>
>
> I totally appreciate the conundrum of messy art and custodians.  I
once
> did a three-week paper mache skeleton project for Dia de Los Muertos
> with 7th graders in a portable classroom that had carpeting.  The
> students' skeletons were fabulous, but the room was never quite the
> same!  LOL!  I was also very, very, very nice to my custodian for the
> rest of my time in that classroom!
>
> -Alix
> (former junior high art teacher)
>
>
> Alix E. Peshette
> Instructional Technology Coordinator
> Placer County Office of Education
> 360 Nevada St.
> Auburn, CA.  95603  USA
> 530-889-5976
> apeshette@placercoe.k12.ca.us
> http://www.placercoe.k12.ca.us
> Blog: http://www.k12hsn.org/edzone/blogs.php/alixpeshette/
> http://del.icio.us/artfully
>
> "Technology - opening minds with a new set of keys"
>
> NOTICE: This e-mail message, including any attachments, is for the
sole
> use of the intended recipient or recipients and may contain
confidential
> and/or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient
or
> agent thereof, be advised that you have received this e-mail in error
> and any use, dissemination, disclosure, forwarding, printing, copying,
> or any action taken in reliance on the contents of this e-mail is
> strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error, please
> notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail and delete the original
> message, attachments, and all copies of the original message from your
> system.
>
> Please note that any views and/or opinions presented in this e-mail
are
> solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of
the
> Placer County Office of Education.
>
> Finally, the recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments
for
> the presence of viruses. Although the Placer County Office of
Education
> has taken reasonable precautions to ensure no viruses are present in
> this e-mail, it accepts no liability for any loss or damage arising
from
> the use of this e-mail or attachments.
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Betty B [mailto:bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 7:38 PM
> Subject: Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
>
> I decided several things, like -loose graphite is awesome, and the
> difference it made in this project is worth the trouble. It helped my
> kids loosen up, their drawings look freer and more relaxed.
>
> The vice-principal called me at home tonight about this, and wanted to
> know what they could buy me to help. They are trying to be helpful and
> are not trying to get me to not use these projects. (She told me the
> same custodian used to yell at her for using glitter) My actual
> classroom custodian is awesome, and is not the least bit bothered, its
> just the guy in the cafeteria. I guess I am just embarassed that this
> was my first real interaction with the new principal.
>
> sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
and
> not let it leak into the hall.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 12:41:17 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
>
> "sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
and
> not let it leak into the hall."
>
> And that's the wonder and beauty of it all.
> Jan in Tampa
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 10:12:43 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> For those of you who don't use loose graphite - it is
> General's Graphite, "since 1889" I'll post some photos of finished
pieces 
> later.
>
> It has gone ok so far today, telling the kids no more graphite, but
one 
> troubled young man who loves art, and had an excellent drawing, just 
> totally shut down, as there was "no point" in going on. The others who
> were behind were fine with using the ebony pencils. He put his drawing
in 
> the trash and just sat staring unblinking all hour, tearing little 
> notecards up into tiny bits, which is what he does when stressed.
> So managing to not cry was my big accomplishment, but I did take his 
> drawing out of the trash and tomorrow hopefully they will have the 
> "carpenters felt" they think will work, and he can do it then.
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: A bit OT - call for help in TX
> From: Heather_Hayes@roundrockisd.org
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 13:08:22 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> I am helping to organize an art festival designed to benefit a group
> of refugees from Burma living in Austin. They're from a tribe that
> has a strong tradition of weaving, and they make beautiful handbags
> and related items.
>
> Anyway, part of the festival is gathering up other things sold by
> fair trade/charity type groups. We've lined up some paper bead
> jewelry made by women in Uganda, and possibly another group in
> Central America that helps kids leave gangs.
>
> Does anyone know of a fair trade arts/craft type of group that might
> want to participate in this? I know of 10,000 Villages, but they're
> too big and incorporated to join in on our festival.
>
> If you have any ideas for me, PLEASE EMAIL ME OFF-LIST!!! I don't
> want to clog up this list with unrelated posts.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Heather in TX
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: robin phillips <robinmcp@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
>
>
> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>
> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
> preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start a
> preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the
teacher to 
> get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped
for 
> one 40 minute class a week.  These 4 year olds will have a full day 
> because there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to
do 
> two half day sessions.  I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise
choice 
> for any 4 year old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I will
have 
> the option of going to their classroom or having them come to mine -
right 
> now I'm planning to go there (no bathroom facilities in my room), but
I'd 
> love to hear your thoghts on this.  Any help will be appreciated - 
> lessons, activities, etc.  I am having a hard time getting excited
about 
> taking on an 8th prep!
> Looking forward to your feedback
>
> Robin in PA
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 23:18:55 +0000
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
>
>
> Hi Robin
>
>
>  If you are in a public school I would recommend that you go to your
union 
> rep, and ask if this is possible. If your contract allows the 8th prep
> without additional compensation or without some other consideration,
make 
> sure it is written in for next time.  Our contract pays if you have to
> teach an additional prep (and while money isn't the only
consideration, 
> because time is a very valuable commodity, the money makes BOE think
twice 
> before just thrusting extra preps on teachers). Our contract also pays
you 
> if you have to "cover" a class during your preparation period or
during 
> your duty period.
>
>
>
>
>
>  That said....
>
>
>
>
>
>  I would speak to the teacher and ask HER what she feels you should 
> accomplish with these 4 year olds as she should be an expert on that
age 
> level and their energy,attention and interest levels.
>
>
>
>
>
>  San D
>
>> From: robinmcp@hotmail.com
>> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help! new preschool assignment
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
>>
>>
>>
>> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>>
>> Help! I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
>> preschoolers in about 2 weeks! Our school received a grant to start a
>> preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the
teacher 
>> to get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being
tapped 
>> for one 40 minute class a week. These 4 year olds will have a full
day 
>> because there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to
do 
>> two half day sessions. I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise
choice 
>> for any 4 year old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I will
have 
>> the option of going to their classroom or having them come to mine - 
>> right now I'm planning to go there (no bathroom facilities in my
room), 
>> but I'd love to hear your thoghts on this. Any help will be
appreciated - 
>> lessons, activities, etc. I am having a hard time getting excited
about 
>> taking on an 8th prep!
>> Looking forward to your feedback
>>
>> Robin in PA
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: "familyerickson" <familyerickson@cox.net>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:26:35 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Here's some things that worked for me with 3 year olds:
> purple crayon drawing based on the book   Harold and the Purple Crayon
> marble painting   show picture of Jackson Pollock
> circle printing with all kinds of lids, corks (use both empty circles
and
> filled in circles)
> ziplock baggies - squirt in red tempera in one corner, yellow in
another
> children massage and discover orange
> blue collage (construction pap., wrapping pap., magazine pages---all
blue)
> show pictures from Picasso's blue period
> playdough day - use the Crayola brand - learn to make balls, snakes,
> pancakes
> colored sand painting - can buy at walmart - do it on scraps of
matteboard
> covered with glue - teach them to use pincher fingers
> painting with matchbox cars
> paint with only pastel colors on pastel paper with q-tips
>
> Buy Mary Ann Kohls books   www.brightring.com
>
> Hope this helps.
> Cindy
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: robin phillips [mailto:robinmcp@hotmail.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 6:08 PM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help! new preschool assignment
>
>
>
>
> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>
> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
> preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start a
> preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the
teacher to
> get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped
for 
> one
> 40 minute class a week.  These 4 year olds will have a full day
because
> there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to do two
half 
> day
> sessions.  I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise choice for any 4
> year
> old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I will have the option of
> going
> to their classroom or having them come to mine - right now I'm
planning to
> go there (no bathroom facilities in my room), but I'd love to hear
your
> thoghts on this.  Any help will be appreciated - lessons, activities,
etc.
> I am having a hard time getting excited about taking on an 8th prep!
> Looking forward to your feedback
>
> Robin in PA
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>
http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-cn
s!55
> 0F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.17/1655 - Release Date:
9/5/2008
> 7:05 PM
>
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.17/1655 - Release Date:
9/5/2008
> 7:05 PM
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 21:09:05 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> On Wed 10/09/08  7:07 PM , robin phillips robinmcp@hotmail.com sent:
>
>> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group
>> of 20 preschoolers in about 2 weeks!
>
________________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
> I teach a group of 30 (split into 2 classes) of "Young Fives"
(basically 
> pre-K or developmental K) for 40 minutes on a rotating
> schedule. They are a challenging, but very creative group of kiddos!
Be 
> aware that many of them will not be able to hold a pair of
> scissors let alone write their own names. That being said, don't be
afraid 
> to challenge them by introducing the elements &
> principles even at this young age! We talk about artists, listen to
music, 
> read books- anything that may inspire creativity. I
> have found that if I break my lessons down into several smaller steps,
> they tend not to get bored as easily. For instance, 10
> minutes of drawing followed by 10 minutes of cutting, finished by 10 
> minutes of gluing.
>
> Often, I send home a letter at the beginning of the year to the
parents 
> explaining that at this age, art is more about the
> experience rather than the finished product, so they should not be
worried 
> if their "Little Picasso" brings home something that is
> unrecognizable because they are definitely being creative. I also am
sure 
> to post a sign at our annual art show that says "It's
> the Process, Not the Product!"
>
> You can see some of my students' artwork here:
> Primary Lines:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=88578
>
> Secondary Shapes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=88638
>
> Magic Glue Windows:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=98408
>
> Kandinsky Colors:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=108467
>
> Joseph Cornell Boxes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=81558
>
> Joan Miro Dreamscapes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=67640
>
> If you want to see more, follow the link below, in my signature. :)
> Good luck!!
>
> Denise Pannell
>
> http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=36837
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Teaching to Observe
> From: "Chantal Pinnow" <cpinnow@yisseoul.org>
> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 14:47:15 +0900
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
>
>
> Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
> see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class was
doing 
> an
> observation painting of their open lockers. I got very frustrated with
> kids
> who after a couple of days, didn't even have their locker open or
wouldn't
> rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on the first day.
Their
> answer was always "I know what it looks like." My question is "How do
you 
> do
> an observation drawing if you aren't observing anything?" I understand
> that
> some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are doing
observation
> paintings.
>
> I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what
something
> looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may notice 
> things
> are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just left and I
was a
> bit frustrated with them.
> Chantal
>
>Drawing from observation is hard if you have not done it a lot and if
you 
>are not a art student.
  An open locker is a great idea....but maybe to hard.  Talk about the
steps 
and do a demonstation.
 I think it is better to start with one object that is interesting like
a 
bicycle.  Let the whole class
 work at the same time so that the students who are more motivated will
lead 
the momentum, also take a break
and do a crit before they are done so they can see each others work and
get 
ideas.
-Phyllis
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
beinart@verizon.net
>
leave-551442-317122.86ad64c1a7d094949f576aae26c7a6a4@lists.pub.getty.edu
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Teaching to Observe
From: Sharon <sharon@art-rageous.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 19:42:57 -0400
X-Message-Number: 21
>>Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they
ACTUALLY
>>see, not just what they think they know it looks like? . . .
>>Chantal
Another thing I do with my Art 1 students is have them "draw what they
feel".  This helps them better understand the concept of contour
drawing.
http://www.art-rageous.net/DrawWhatUFeelGame.html
Paper lunch bags are numbered, and each bag contains one small,
strange item (a dinosaur key chain, an old-style fuse, guitar string
winder and other things they probably won't be able to identify by
touch).
They put their "non-drawing" hand into the bag and then draw the
object based on their sense of touch.  When they finish drawing an
item, they return the bag to the table and get another.  They spend
about 1/2 an hour with this exercise and it really does help them
"get" it.
-- 
Sharon
www.art-rageous.net
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: September 10, 2008
From: kathleenpdoherty@comcast.net
Date: Fri, 12 Sep 2008 00:33:12 +0000
X-Message-Number: 22
Hi Robin
This past summer on the first day of summer school I found out about an
hour before class was to start that I would not be teaching middle
school students art but pre-k and kindergarten students.  I hadn't
taught students that young in more than 20 years.  After quite a bit of
very quick reorganization the program worked out well.  I concentrated
on painting with the children.  They rarely get the proper feedback in
their classrooms concerning their painting. We rearranged the schedule
slightly and I taught two half hour classes a period instead of an hour
class.  This was just enough time to discuss a topic with the students,
maybe show a few pictures on the projector illustrating our topic
(fireworks, at the beach, etc), talk about shapes and colors, get them
started painting, paint, clean up, and the on to the next group.  The
teaching assistant came with each class, giving me another hand in
handing out supplies and cleaning up.  We all had a great time and we
all learned a lot
.  I only used the primary colors and black and white and the students
picked up color mixing very quickly.  We used washable paint so we
didn't have to spend time with smocks or aprons.  I didn't hav a
bathroom in the room - it wasn't a problem.  It was a very enjoyable
experience.  "Experience & Art: Teaching Children to Paint," by Nancy R
Smith, et al.  is a great book to read for painting with young, and not
so young, children.
Kathy 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Subject: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: robin phillips <robinmcp@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 7
> 
> 
> 
> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
> 
> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
> preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start a
preschool 
> class in our elementary building and in order for the teacher to get
her 
> contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped for one
40 minute 
> class a week.  These 4 year olds will have a full day because there
isn't enough 
> money in the budget for transportation to do two half day sessions.  I
cannot 
> imagine that a full day is a wise choice for any 4 year old.... but
that's how 
> it's going to happen! I will have the option of going to their
classroom or 
> having them come to mine - right now I'm planning to go there (no
bathroom 
> facilities in my room), but I'd love to hear your thoghts on this.
Any help 
> will be appreciated - lessons, activities, etc.  I am having a hard
time getting 
> excited about taking on an 8th prep!
> Looking forward to your feedback
> 
> Robin in PA
> 
> _________________________________________________________________
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Subject: Teaching to Observe
From: Ann Heineman <aiheineman@prodigy.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 20:58:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 23
Hi Woody and Group,
	With blocking an eye for me, you would certainly get some
interesting  
drawing!  I lack binocular vision and stereopsis due to ocular  
misalignment, and with that I have an eye movement disorder called  
"latent nystagmus." So when an eye is covered, the world for me shakes/ 
jerks side to side and my vision is greatly impaired. Even when I use  
both eyes, following a moving object is difficult. It takes me longer  
to focus. In school/college I struggled, for example, with life  
drawing, bubble test sheets and any sport activity involving a ball.   
So be aware and sensitive that some students may have difficulty with  
certain activities in your classes.
			Wishing everyone a great school year!  Keep your
ideas flowing on  
this list.  I still enjoy being in the loop even though I am retired.
				Ann-on-y-mouse in Columbus
				Art teacher, K-5, retired 6 years
	
				
  It takes a while for my eyes to focus on things.
	
On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:51 PM, Woody Duncan wrote:
>
> c.
> Good observational drawing is simply copying what you see before you.
> In the Renaissance, artists traced the 3-D world before them on a  
> sheet of
> glass keeping their point of view constant by resting their face  
> against a
> brace attached to the sheet of glass. This kept them from moving their
> eyes. Also, you might suggest that students draw with one eye closed
> to restrict binocular vision.
> 					Good Luck, Woody
> Do stress that you are teaching them how to see rather than how to  
> draw.
>
>> They do detailed contour drawings of their book-bags on
>> mini-easels on the desk.
>> They find that when I walk around and say "where is  that in your  
>> bookbag?"
>> or "where is that in your drawing?"
>> Not sure if this  helped......
>> Does anyone have a handout that might help introduce shading? What  
>> are the
>> best artists to use as reference?
>>
>> Thanks!!
>> terri
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> **************Psssst...Have you heard the news? There's a new  
>> fashion blog,
>> plus the latest fall trends and hair styles at StyleList.com.
>> (http://www.stylelist.com/trends?ncid=aolsty00050000000014)
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
> Read My Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/September.html
>
> Watercolors on Note Cards
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>
> January 19, 2009 Be Patience America
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go
tohttp://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: Subject: Teaching to Observe
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 20:17:45 -0600
X-Message-Number: 24
Ann - Thank you for the point. I hope we are all flexible with the  
various needs of our students.
I've had several color blind students who needed adjustments in  
assignments.
								Woody
On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:58 PM, Ann Heineman wrote:
> Hi Woody and Group,
> 	With blocking an eye for me, you would certainly get some  
> interesting drawing!  I lack binocular vision and stereopsis due to  
> ocular misalignment, and with that I have an eye movement disorder  
> called "latent nystagmus." So when an eye is covered, the world for  
> me shakes/jerks side to side and my vision is greatly impaired.  
> Even when I use both eyes, following a moving object is difficult.  
> It takes me longer to focus. In school/college I struggled, for  
> example, with life drawing, bubble test sheets and any sport  
> activity involving a ball.  So be aware and sensitive that some  
> students may have difficulty with certain activities in your classes.
>
> 			Wishing everyone a great school year!  Keep your
ideas flowing  
> on this list.  I still enjoy being in the loop even though I am  
> retired.
>
> 				Ann-on-y-mouse in Columbus
> 				Art teacher, K-5, retired 6 years
> 	
>
> 				
>  It takes a while for my eyes to focus on things.
> 	
> On Sep 11, 2008, at 6:51 PM, Woody Duncan wrote:
>
>>
>> c.
>> Good observational drawing is simply copying what you see before you.
>> In the Renaissance, artists traced the 3-D world before them on a  
>> sheet of
>> glass keeping their point of view constant by resting their face  
>> against a
>> brace attached to the sheet of glass. This kept them from moving  
>> their
>> eyes. Also, you might suggest that students draw with one eye closed
>> to restrict binocular vision.
>> 					Good Luck, Woody
>> Do stress that you are teaching them how to see rather than how to  
>> draw.
>>
>>> They do detailed contour drawings of their book-bags on
>>> mini-easels on the desk.
>>> They find that when I walk around and say "where is  that in your  
>>> bookbag?"
>>> or "where is that in your drawing?"
>>> Not sure if this  helped......
>>> Does anyone have a handout that might help introduce shading?  
>>> What are the
>>> best artists to use as reference?
>>>
>>> Thanks!!
>>> terri
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> **************Psssst...Have you heard the news? There's a new  
>>> fashion blog,
>>> plus the latest fall trends and hair styles at StyleList.com.
>>> (http://www.stylelist.com/trends?ncid=aolsty00050000000014)
>>>
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>> Read My Blog:
>> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/September.html
>>
>> Watercolors on Note Cards
>> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
>>
>> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>>
>> January 19, 2009 Be Patience America
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go tohttp://www.getty.edu/education/ 
>> teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go tohttp://www.getty.edu/education/ 
> teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
         mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
Read My Blog:
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/September.html
Watercolors on Note Cards
http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Digital curriculum, resources, and workshops
From: Claire d'Anthes <cdanthes@verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 22:05:03 -0700
X-Message-Number: 25
Hi, all!
Like someone else who recently wrote in, I'm teaching digital this  
year.  It's really fun, but my skills are not yet where they should be.
(Let's hear it for admin who thinks that because you can teach drawing,
ceramics, painting, 2-D, ESL, and French, beginning and advanced in all
classes, tyou can certainly also effectively teach digital at the h.s  
level with 6 weeks prep).  I don't want my better students to miss  
out.. I've seen Ken Scwab's and H. Olejarz's wonderful websites, but if
anyone else has any projects, books, workshops, tutorial blogs,  
websites, etc. to share, my students and I would really appreciate  
this.  I will share back.
Thanks,
Claire
cdanthes@dphs.org
On Sep 11, 2008, at 1:00 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, September 10, 2008.
>
> 1. Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 2. loose graphite
> 3. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 4. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 5. RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> 6. A bit OT - call for help in TX
> 7. Help!  new preschool assignment
> 8. RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 9. RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 10. Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
> 11. Teaching to Observe
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 05:44:55 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> I think the custodian is being unreasonable.  If you don't want to
> clean, don't get a job cleaning!  I'm sure you do all you can to keep
> it contained, and it's not like you're always leaving messes for him
> to clean up.  It sounds like the VP realizes he's being unreasonable,
> too.
>
> I didn't know about the sticky mat.  That's a neat idea.
>
> Other than that, the only thing I could think of would be to keep a
> swiffer or something around and don't let the kids walk out until
> you've swiffer'd.  Maybe even have them remove their shoes and keep
> them by the classroom door, so that the stuff doesn't get onto the
> shoes and tracked out of the classroom.  If that doesn't make him
> happy, he's probably determined not to be and there isn't much you can
> do about it.
>
> -b-
>
>
>
> On Tue, Sep 9, 2008 at 10:37 PM, Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> wrote:
>>
>> I decided several things, like -loose graphite is awesome, and the  
>> difference it made in this project is worth the trouble. It helped my
>> kids loosen up, their drawings look freer and more relaxed.
>>
>> The vice-principal called me at home tonight about this, and wanted  
>> to know what they could buy me to help. They are trying to be helpful
>> and are not trying to get me to not use these projects. (She told me
>> the same custodian used to yell at her for using glitter) My actual  
>> classroom custodian is awesome, and is not the least bit bothered,  
>> its just the guy in the cafeteria. I guess I am just embarassed that
>> this was my first real interaction with the new principal.
>>
>> sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
>> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room
>> and not let it leak into the hall.
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
> --
> Carpe You Some Diem!
> Website: http://www.rebeccaburch.com
> Store: http://carpeyousomediem.etsy.com
> Network: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccaburch
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: loose graphite
> From: Pam Wellington <loveart@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 10:56:42 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
>
> Dear Betty,
> When I use charcoal I give the students a dust pan and have them sweep
> all the  looose charcoal which is on the table and any that landed on
> the floor into the pan and into the trash.  HOWEVER, you never, ever  
> need to apologize for making a mess in the art room!  Don't ever  
> apologize to anyone for it!  Art classes are MESSY. The job of the  
> custodian is to CLEAN.  That is what he/she gets PAID to do.  It is  
> rediculous for any administrator to even give an ear to any custodian
> complaining about having to clean up a legitimate mess made in any  
> room!  But ART?!  Don't let it get to you.  The custodian who  
> complained is the one who should be in trouble, not you!  As long as  
> the mess is reasonable, not deliberate or over the top.
> Pam Wellington
> Art Dept. Chair
> Boiling Springs H.S
> Boiling Springs,Pa
>
>
>> Subject: loose graphite/charcoal management
>> From: Betty B
>> Date: Tue, 9 Sep 2008 13:16:18 -0700 (PDT)
>> X-Message-Number: 2
>>
>> Before the school year started, I found my first-year journal, and I
>> wrote about how, when I did charcoal, the custodian told other  
>> teachers she would quit if they didn't get rid of me. Well, it is 8  
>> years later and I haven't done charcoal or loose graphite since.
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
> http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-
> cns!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Peshette, Alix" <apeshette@placercoe.k12.ca.us>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 09:30:12 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Betty,
> I'm glad to hear that the vice-principal called wanting to solve the
> problem with better equipment.  Like Ken, I don't know what loose
> graphite and charcoal are, but I can guess at the set-up and cleaning
> issues.  Some thoughts that come to mind are:
>
> Like glitter (I laughed out loud about your vice-principal's comments
> on
> her glitter use), maybe the students need to be working in an
> environment that has an edge - like inside the lid of a paper box.   
> This
> way the graphite will have more containment.
>
> If this stuff has a tendency to be somewhat airborne, maybe it needs
to
> be used in what would be a "spray painting booth."  One can build one
> these with PVC pipe and fittings (no glue so that it can be
> disassembled) and a roll of plastic sheeting from the local hardware  
> big
> box store.  The booth can sit on a table top or be a full-size
walk-in.
>
>
> I totally appreciate the conundrum of messy art and custodians.  I
once
> did a three-week paper mache skeleton project for Dia de Los Muertos
> with 7th graders in a portable classroom that had carpeting.  The
> students' skeletons were fabulous, but the room was never quite the
> same!  LOL!  I was also very, very, very nice to my custodian for the
> rest of my time in that classroom!
>
> -Alix
> (former junior high art teacher)
>
>
> Alix E. Peshette
> Instructional Technology Coordinator
> Placer County Office of Education
> 360 Nevada St.
> Auburn, CA.  95603  USA
> 530-889-5976
> apeshette@placercoe.k12.ca.us
> http://www.placercoe.k12.ca.us
> Blog: http://www.k12hsn.org/edzone/blogs.php/alixpeshette/
> http://del.icio.us/artfully
>
> "Technology - opening minds with a new set of keys"
>
> NOTICE: This e-mail message, including any attachments, is for the
sole
> use of the intended recipient or recipients and may contain  
> confidential
> and/or privileged information. If you are not the intended recipient
or
> agent thereof, be advised that you have received this e-mail in error
> and any use, dissemination, disclosure, forwarding, printing, copying,
> or any action taken in reliance on the contents of this e-mail is
> strictly prohibited. If you have received this e-mail in error, please
> notify the sender immediately by reply e-mail and delete the original
> message, attachments, and all copies of the original message from your
> system.
>
> Please note that any views and/or opinions presented in this e-mail
are
> solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of  
> the
> Placer County Office of Education.
>
> Finally, the recipient should check this e-mail and any attachments
for
> the presence of viruses. Although the Placer County Office of
Education
> has taken reasonable precautions to ensure no viruses are present in
> this e-mail, it accepts no liability for any loss or damage arising  
> from
> the use of this e-mail or attachments.
>
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Betty B [mailto:bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 7:38 PM
> Subject: Re: loose graphite/charcoal management
>
> I decided several things, like -loose graphite is awesome, and the
> difference it made in this project is worth the trouble. It helped my
> kids loosen up, their drawings look freer and more relaxed.
>
> The vice-principal called me at home tonight about this, and wanted to
> know what they could buy me to help. They are trying to be helpful and
> are not trying to get me to not use these projects. (She told me the
> same custodian used to yell at her for using glitter) My actual
> classroom custodian is awesome, and is not the least bit bothered, its
> just the guy in the cafeteria. I guess I am just embarassed that this
> was my first real interaction with the new principal.
>
> sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room  
> and
> not let it leak into the hall.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 12:41:17 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
>
> "sigh. Art leaks! Whatever I do, I can't guarantee it will stay in the
> room - its like telling the band to keep the music inside their room  
> and
> not let it leak into the hall."
>
> And that's the wonder and beauty of it all.
> Jan in Tampa
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: loose graphite/charcoal management
> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 10:12:43 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> For those of you who don't use loose graphite - it is
> General's Graphite, "since 1889" I'll post some photos of finished  
> pieces later.
>
> It has gone ok so far today, telling the kids no more graphite, but  
> one troubled young man who loves art, and had an excellent drawing,  
> just totally shut down, as there was "no point" in going on. The  
> others who were behind were fine with using the ebony pencils. He put
> his drawing in the trash and just sat staring unblinking all hour,  
> tearing little notecards up into tiny bits, which is what he does when
> stressed.
> So managing to not cry was my big accomplishment, but I did take his  
> drawing out of the trash and tomorrow hopefully they will have the  
> "carpenters felt" they think will work, and he can do it then.
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: A bit OT - call for help in TX
> From: Heather_Hayes@roundrockisd.org
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 13:08:22 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> I am helping to organize an art festival designed to benefit a group
> of refugees from Burma living in Austin. They're from a tribe that
> has a strong tradition of weaving, and they make beautiful handbags
> and related items.
>
> Anyway, part of the festival is gathering up other things sold by
> fair trade/charity type groups. We've lined up some paper bead
> jewelry made by women in Uganda, and possibly another group in
> Central America that helps kids leave gangs.
>
> Does anyone know of a fair trade arts/craft type of group that might
> want to participate in this? I know of 10,000 Villages, but they're
> too big and incorporated to join in on our festival.
>
> If you have any ideas for me, PLEASE EMAIL ME OFF-LIST!!! I don't
> want to clog up this list with unrelated posts.
>
> Thanks!
>
> Heather in TX
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: robin phillips <robinmcp@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
>
>
> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>
> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
> preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start a
> preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the  
> teacher to get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are  
> being tapped for one 40 minute class a week.  These 4 year olds will  
> have a full day because there isn't enough money in the budget for  
> transportation to do two half day sessions.  I cannot imagine that a  
> full day is a wise choice for any 4 year old.... but that's how it's  
> going to happen! I will have the option of going to their classroom or
> having them come to mine - right now I'm planning to go there (no  
> bathroom facilities in my room), but I'd love to hear your thoghts on
> this.  Any help will be appreciated - lessons, activities, etc.  I am
> having a hard time getting excited about taking on an 8th prep!
> Looking forward to your feedback
>
> Robin in PA
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
> http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-
> cns!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: San D Hasselman <shasselman@hotmail.com>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 23:18:55 +0000
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
>
>
> Hi Robin
>
>
>   If you are in a public school I would recommend that you go to your
> union rep, and ask if this is possible. If your contract allows the  
> 8th prep without additional compensation or without some other  
> consideration, make sure it is written in for next time.  Our contract
> pays if you have to teach an additional prep (and while money isn't  
> the only consideration, because time is a very valuable commodity, the
> money makes BOE think twice before just thrusting extra preps on  
> teachers). Our contract also pays you if you have to "cover" a class  
> during your preparation period or during your duty period.
>
>
>
>
>
>   That said....
>
>
>
>
>
>   I would speak to the teacher and ask HER what she feels you should  
> accomplish with these 4 year olds as she should be an expert on that  
> age level and their energy,attention and interest levels.
>
>
>
>
>
>   San D
>
>> From: robinmcp@hotmail.com
>> To: teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu
>> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help! new preschool assignment
>> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:07:50 -0400
>>
>>
>>
>> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>>
>> Help! I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
>> preschoolers in about 2 weeks! Our school received a grant to start a
>> preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the  
>> teacher to get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are  
>> being tapped for one 40 minute class a week. These 4 year olds will  
>> have a full day because there isn't enough money in the budget for  
>> transportation to do two half day sessions. I cannot imagine that a  
>> full day is a wise choice for any 4 year old.... but that's how it's
>> going to happen! I will have the option of going to their classroom  
>> or having them come to mine - right now I'm planning to go there (no
>> bathroom facilities in my room), but I'd love to hear your thoghts on
>> this. Any help will be appreciated - lessons, activities, etc. I am  
>> having a hard time getting excited about taking on an 8th prep!
>> Looking forward to your feedback
>>
>> Robin in PA
>>
>> _________________________________________________________________
>> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
>> http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com- 
>> Blog-cns!550F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: "familyerickson" <familyerickson@cox.net>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 19:26:35 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> Here's some things that worked for me with 3 year olds:
> purple crayon drawing based on the book   Harold and the Purple Crayon
> marble painting   show picture of Jackson Pollock
> circle printing with all kinds of lids, corks (use both empty circles
> and
> filled in circles)
> ziplock baggies - squirt in red tempera in one corner, yellow in  
> another
> children massage and discover orange
> blue collage (construction pap., wrapping pap., magazine pages---all  
> blue)
> show pictures from Picasso's blue period
> playdough day - use the Crayola brand - learn to make balls, snakes,
> pancakes
> colored sand painting - can buy at walmart - do it on scraps of  
> matteboard
> covered with glue - teach them to use pincher fingers
> painting with matchbox cars
> paint with only pastel colors on pastel paper with q-tips
>
> Buy Mary Ann Kohls books   www.brightring.com
>
> Hope this helps.
> Cindy
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: robin phillips [mailto:robinmcp@hotmail.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, September 10, 2008 6:08 PM
> To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] Help! new preschool assignment
>
>
>
>
> Dear Fellow ArtsEdNet Friends,
>
> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group of 20
> preschoolers in about 2 weeks!  Our school received a grant to start a
> preschool class in our elementary building and in order for the  
> teacher to
> get her contractual 40 minute prep, the specialists are being tapped  
> for one
> 40 minute class a week.  These 4 year olds will have a full day
because
> there isn't enough money in the budget for transportation to do two  
> half day
> sessions.  I cannot imagine that a full day is a wise choice for any 4
> year
> old.... but that's how it's going to happen! I will have the option of
> going
> to their classroom or having them come to mine - right now I'm  
> planning to
> go there (no bathroom facilities in my room), but I'd love to hear
your
> thoghts on this.  Any help will be appreciated - lessons, activities,
> etc.
> I am having a hard time getting excited about taking on an 8th prep!
> Looking forward to your feedback
>
> Robin in PA
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Get more out of the Web. Learn 10 hidden secrets of Windows Live.
> http://windowslive.com/connect/post/jamiethomson.spaces.live.com-Blog-
> cns!55
> 0F681DAD532637!5295.entry?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_domore_092008
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> No virus found in this incoming message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.17/1655 - Release Date:  
> 9/5/2008
> 7:05 PM
>
> No virus found in this outgoing message.
> Checked by AVG.
> Version: 7.5.526 / Virus Database: 270.6.17/1655 - Release Date:  
> 9/5/2008
> 7:05 PM
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Help!  new preschool assignment
> From: Denise Pannell <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
> Date: Wed, 10 Sep 2008 21:09:05 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> On Wed 10/09/08  7:07 PM , robin phillips robinmcp@hotmail.com sent:
>
>> Help!  I just found out that I will be "teaching" art to a group
>> of 20 preschoolers in about 2 weeks!
>
_______________________________________________________________________ 
> _______________________________________________________
> I teach a group of 30 (split into 2 classes) of "Young Fives"  
> (basically pre-K or developmental K) for 40 minutes on a rotating
> schedule. They are a challenging, but very creative group of kiddos!  
> Be aware that many of them will not be able to hold a pair of
> scissors let alone write their own names. That being said, don't be  
> afraid to challenge them by introducing the elements &
> principles even at this young age! We talk about artists, listen to  
> music, read books- anything that may inspire creativity. I
> have found that if I break my lessons down into several smaller steps,
> they tend not to get bored as easily. For instance, 10
> minutes of drawing followed by 10 minutes of cutting, finished by 10  
> minutes of gluing.
>
> Often, I send home a letter at the beginning of the year to the  
> parents explaining that at this age, art is more about the
> experience rather than the finished product, so they should not be  
> worried if their "Little Picasso" brings home something that is
> unrecognizable because they are definitely being creative. I also am  
> sure to post a sign at our annual art show that says "It's
> the Process, Not the Product!"
>
> You can see some of my students' artwork here:
> Primary Lines:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=88578
>
> Secondary Shapes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=88638
>
> Magic Glue Windows:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=98408
>
> Kandinsky Colors:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=108467
>
> Joseph Cornell Boxes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=81558
>
> Joan Miro Dreamscapes:
> http://www.artsonia.com/museum/gallery.asp?exhibit=67640
>
> If you want to see more, follow the link below, in my signature. :)
> Good luck!!
>
> Denise Pannell
>
> http://www.artsonia.com/schools/school.asp?id=36837
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Teaching to Observe
> From: "Chantal Pinnow" <cpinnow@yisseoul.org>
> Date: Thu, 11 Sep 2008 14:47:15 +0900
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
>
>
>  Does anyone have a good example to teach kids to draw what they  
> ACTUALLY
> see, not just what they think they know it looks like? My class was  
> doing an
> observation painting of their open lockers. I got very frustrated with
> kids
> who after a couple of days, didn't even have their locker open or  
> wouldn't
> rearrange their books the same way as they drew it on the first day.  
> Their
> answer was always "I know what it looks like." My question is "How do
> you do
> an observation drawing if you aren't observing anything?" I understand
> that
> some artwork is from memory or imagination, but we are doing  
> observation
> paintings.
>
> I would like a way to show them that you may THINK you know what  
> something
> looks like, but when you actually take time to observe you may notice
> things
> are quite different. Sorry for the rant. That class just left and I  
> was a
> bit frustrated with them.
> Chantal
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
> cdanthes@verizon.net
> leave-551442 
> -65505.57b35ccfeb76b13960e04d32e2e2a040@lists.pub.getty.edu
>
---
END OF DIGEST
---
ssyrie@cheneysd.org
leave-552084-317167.368d5ae9c9e98b1f8b325dba41b3639c@lists.pub.getty.edu
---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html