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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: August 31, 2008

---------

sockmonkeyj1_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Mon Sep 01 2008 - 15:53:39 PDT


Re: The Troll - Where does all this hate & anger come from????
It comes from reading rags like the one that article was taken from. I am heartened to see that everyone saw it for what it was: the antithesis of art. Let's keep our minds open and our souls creative - for the record: graffiti is art - tagging is usually gang related communications and to the knowledgable never the twain should meet!
Jan
---- TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu> wrote:
> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Sunday, August 31, 2008.
>
> 1. Re: interesting article..
> 2. Advice for New K-8 Art Teacher
> 3. Re: interesting article..
> 4. Re: Advice for New K-8 Art Teacher
> 5. screen printing -- where to get T's
> 6. Re: interesting article..
> 7. Tape Sculptures
> 8. questions
> 9. Fw: first day of school assessments and georgio o'keefe
> 10. Re: interesting article..
> 11. Re: questions
> 12. Re: Fw: first day of school assessments and georgio o'keefe
> 13. Re: interesting article..
> 14. My apologies
> 15. Re: questions
> 16. Voice Thread. Have you tried it?
> 17. Re: Voice Thread. Have you tried it?
> 18. many eyes
> 19. Re: questions
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: interesting article..
> From: Jean King <kingjean@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 08:25:01 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> For several days I have been thinking about the very disturbing
> article that you mentioned as being "articulate on the subject" of
> graffiti.
>
> I must have missed out on something here. I haven't heard of
> "taggers" or graffiti artists killing people who try to stop them.
> Where and when did such a thing happen? How many times has it
> occurred? Are there gangs of killer taggers running our streets?
> Where are the facts? I couldn't find any in the article.
>
> The article you gave the URL to seems to be attempting to define
> differences in conservative and liberal thought processes and beliefs
> about graffiti and private property, among other things. The logic
> there is faulty at best. Then, somehow, the author turns to advocate
> shooting taggers. Have I missed something?
>
> The article advocates "shooting to wound". Interesting. I hope the
> righteous citizen who takes this to heart is an excellent shot.
> According to what the author of the article is suggesting, at the very
> least people will be hurt, if not killed, and not by killer taggers,
> but rather by self righteous conservatives. The general public is at
> risk of stray bullets and anyone could end up dead or injured. I
> don't know about you, but it seems irresponsible to encourage people
> to shoot people.
>
> If there are killer taggers, and again that is a big IF with no facts
> to support it, do you believe there should be vigilante squads to hunt
> them? I live in a large city with a great deal of graffiti. We have
> laws. We have police. I seem to recall somewhere hearing that it was
> not the best idea for me to take the law into my own hands. When I
> spot someone breaking the law, such as painting on my neighbor's
> fence, I call the police. That's what they are there for. Vandalism
> is vandalism. Private property is private property. There are laws
> dealing with graffiti and vandalism in my city. There are also gun
> laws.
>
> There is a difference between simply vandalizing property and creating
> art, at least in my mind, although not in the eyes of the law. Most
> of the graffiti that appears in my neighborhood is not very
> aesthetically pleasing, but some of it is truly thought provoking.
> Some of the graffiti in my neighborhood is done at the invitation of
> the property owner. But that aside, since when does graffiti create
> the need to shoot its creators?
>
> Years ago I used to read the National Enquirer because I found it
> humorous, that was, until I realized some people took it seriously.
> This article reminds me that some people believe anything they read.
>
> Jean King
> Houston, Texas
>
> On Aug 26, 2008, at 8:39 AM, Shannon McGraw wrote:
>
> > I remember a while ago, a discussion on graffiti. Taggers are now
> > killing people that try to stop them. I may be the only conservative
> > art teacher in America..but at the time, I said graffiti is not to be
> > admired and elevated to art. It's a crime, and giving crime a 'pass'
> > only allows it to grow; hence the fact that many are embolden to kill
> > those that try and stop them.
> > Here's someone more articulate on the subject.
> >
> > http://townhall.com/columnists/DennisPrager/2008/08/26/on_shooting_tagge
> > rs_why_conservatives_and_liberals_differ?page=full&comments=true
> >
> > Shannon McGraw
> >
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Advice for New K-8 Art Teacher
> From: Kathleen Toomey <k_toomey2002@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 07:36:39 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Hi Everyone,
> Im new here. Im looking for any advice on planning and organizing lessons for my new teaching job. I've gotten my first job teaching art at a private school one day a week for grades K-8. I see each class once a week for 30 minute sessions( not alot of time!) Im just looking for some advice on where to begin the year. Ive taught prek and kindegarten aged art before as well as after school K-5 but have never had to devise lessons that progressed throughout the year. My question is: Do I begin with the basic elements and work through them through the year. Creating several lessons that extend on each element? I feel as if this would be benificial for the K-3 but the older children may already be very familiar with this. Can anyone give me advice on where to begin and what to progress to with each grade level? Can Grades 3 and 4 work at the same pace, same for 5 and 6????Any advice is appreciated!!
> Kathleen
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: interesting article..
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 08:41:55 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Yes - Graffiti can be are but most graffiti is just gangs tagging the
> neighborhoods. In Albuquerque, we have
> cut the tagger problem down to a manageable level. If we see graffiti
> we call the "Graffiti Hot Line" and a city
> crew removes or covers it the same on the next day. I use to describe
> tagging to my students as just like
> dogs lifting their hind legs to mark their territory. I believe all
> cities should check into our cities graffiti removal
> program. http://www.cabq.gov/solidwaste/outreach/graffiti
> Woody
>
> On Aug 31, 2008, at 7:25 AM, Jean King wrote:
>
> > For several days I have been thinking about the very disturbing
> > article that you mentioned as being "articulate on the subject" of
> > graffiti.
> >
> > I must have missed out on something here. I haven't heard of
> > "taggers" or graffiti artists killing people who try to stop them.
> > Where and when did such a thing happen? How many times has it
> > occurred? Are there gangs of killer taggers running our streets?
> > Where are the facts? I couldn't find any in the article.
> >
> > The article you gave the URL to seems to be attempting to define
> > differences in conservative and liberal thought processes and
> > beliefs about graffiti and private property, among other things.
> > The logic there is faulty at best. Then, somehow, the author turns
> > to advocate shooting taggers. Have I missed something?
> >
> > The article advocates "shooting to wound". Interesting. I hope
> > the righteous citizen who takes this to heart is an excellent
> > shot. According to what the author of the article is suggesting,
> > at the very least people will be hurt, if not killed, and not by
> > killer taggers, but rather by self righteous conservatives. The
> > general public is at risk of stray bullets and anyone could end up
> > dead or injured. I don't know about you, but it seems
> > irresponsible to encourage people to shoot people.
> >
> > If there are killer taggers, and again that is a big IF with no
> > facts to support it, do you believe there should be vigilante
> > squads to hunt them? I live in a large city with a great deal of
> > graffiti. We have laws. We have police. I seem to recall
> > somewhere hearing that it was not the best idea for me to take the
> > law into my own hands. When I spot someone breaking the law, such
> > as painting on my neighbor's fence, I call the police. That's what
> > they are there for. Vandalism is vandalism. Private property is
> > private property. There are laws dealing with graffiti and
> > vandalism in my city. There are also gun laws.
> >
> > There is a difference between simply vandalizing property and
> > creating art, at least in my mind, although not in the eyes of the
> > law. Most of the graffiti that appears in my neighborhood is not
> > very aesthetically pleasing, but some of it is truly thought
> > provoking. Some of the graffiti in my neighborhood is done at the
> > invitation of the property owner. But that aside, since when does
> > graffiti create the need to shoot its creators?
> >
> > Years ago I used to read the National Enquirer because I found it
> > humorous, that was, until I realized some people took it
> > seriously. This article reminds me that some people believe
> > anything they read.
> >
> > Jean King
> > Houston, Texas
> >
> > On Aug 26, 2008, at 8:39 AM, Shannon McGraw wrote:
> >
> >> I remember a while ago, a discussion on graffiti. Taggers are now
> >> killing people that try to stop them. I may be the only conservative
> >> art teacher in America..but at the time, I said graffiti is not to be
> >> admired and elevated to art. It's a crime, and giving crime a 'pass'
> >> only allows it to grow; hence the fact that many are embolden to kill
> >> those that try and stop them.
> >> Here's someone more articulate on the subject.
> >>
> >> http://townhall.com/columnists/DennisPrager/2008/08/26/
> >> on_shooting_tagge
> >> rs_why_conservatives_and_liberals_differ?page=full&comments=true
> >>
> >> Shannon McGraw
> >>
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> Read My Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/August.html
>
> Watercolors on Note Cards
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Advice for New K-8 Art Teacher
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 09:04:15 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
> Kathleen,
> As you work through your first year - keep in mind that you will have
> many of these students for several years.
> When they come to you next year they will need new experiences to
> build upon the lessons from last year.
> As the years go by, you will see the knowledge and skills of the
> students develop and grow. In our middle school,
> as I retired, we were introducing "looping" for the regular teachers.
> Teachers moving with the students as they got older
> rather than teaching the same grade each year. There was a lot of
> resistance by teachers toward this change. I tried
> to explain that, as an art teacher, I have always been looping. I get
> a student in the 6th grade, then again in the 7th and
> the 8th. When I see them next year, they know me and my expectations.
> I know what concepts I exposed them to last year
> and I know what skill level they are at. So, I am in a good position
> to move them forward more easily because we know each other.
> You will find yourself in this sort of position as the years proceed.
> I urge you to plan to take full advantage of the situation.
> Woody
>
> On Aug 31, 2008, at 8:36 AM, Kathleen Toomey wrote:
>
> > Hi Everyone,
> > Im new here. Im looking for any advice on planning and organizing
> > lessons for my new teaching job. I've gotten my first job teaching
> > art at a private school one day a week for grades K-8. I see each
> > class once a week for 30 minute sessions( not alot of time!) Im
> > just looking for some advice on where to begin the year. Ive taught
> > prek and kindegarten aged art before as well as after school K-5
> > but have never had to devise lessons that progressed throughout the
> > year. My question is: Do I begin with the basic elements and work
> > through them through the year. Creating several lessons that extend
> > on each element? I feel as if this would be benificial for the K-3
> > but the older children may already be very familiar with this. Can
> > anyone give me advice on where to begin and what to progress to
> > with each grade level? Can Grades 3 and 4 work at the same pace,
> > same for 5 and 6????Any advice is appreciated!!
> > Kathleen
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> Read My Blog:
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog08/August.html
>
> Watercolors on Note Cards
> http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysWatercolor/NoteCards.html
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: screen printing -- where to get T's
> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 11:03:54 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
> I always do a screen printing project with my students and let them
> make their own T's. We used to get our shirts from a local graphics
> shop -- they always gave us a great discount on their "leftovers."
> But they're under new management now, and the deal is off.
>
> Anyone know a good, inexpensive shirt supplier?
>
> -b-
>
>
>
> --
> Carpe You Some Diem!
> Website: http://www.rebeccaburch.com
> Store: http://carpeyousomediem.etsy.com
> Network: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccaburch
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: interesting article..
> From: Gayle Parent <gayleparent@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 09:57:26 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> I agree. I have never seen tagging that could cause a death, unless
> it was the death of a tagger hanging over a bridge to put some words
> there for all to see. Where does this incredible hate/anger come
> from? Tagging is in my neighborhood too, and I don't like it, but I
> would rather help to give the tagger something better to do with his
> time. Don't kill him, or even wound him.
>
> Gayle
>
>
> On Aug 31, 2008, at 6:25 AM, Jean King wrote:
>
> > For several days I have been thinking about the very disturbing
> > article that you mentioned as being "articulate on the subject" of
> > graffiti.
> >
> > I must have missed out on something here. I haven't heard of
> > "taggers" or graffiti artists killing people who try to stop them.
> > Where and when did such a thing happen? How many times has it
> > occurred? Are there gangs of killer taggers running our streets?
> > Where are the facts? I couldn't find any in the article.
> >
> > The article you gave the URL to seems to be attempting to define
> > differences in conservative and liberal thought processes and
> > beliefs about graffiti and private property, among other things.
> > The logic there is faulty at best. Then, somehow, the author turns
> > to advocate shooting taggers. Have I missed something?
> >
> > The article advocates "shooting to wound". Interesting. I hope
> > the righteous citizen who takes this to heart is an excellent
> > shot. According to what the author of the article is suggesting,
> > at the very least people will be hurt, if not killed, and not by
> > killer taggers, but rather by self righteous conservatives. The
> > general public is at risk of stray bullets and anyone could end up
> > dead or injured. I don't know about you, but it seems
> > irresponsible to encourage people to shoot people.
> >
> > If there are killer taggers, and again that is a big IF with no
> > facts to support it, do you believe there should be vigilante
> > squads to hunt them? I live in a large city with a great deal of
> > graffiti. We have laws. We have police. I seem to recall
> > somewhere hearing that it was not the best idea for me to take the
> > law into my own hands. When I spot someone breaking the law, such
> > as painting on my neighbor's fence, I call the police. That's what
> > they are there for. Vandalism is vandalism. Private property is
> > private property. There are laws dealing with graffiti and
> > vandalism in my city. There are also gun laws.
> >
> > There is a difference between simply vandalizing property and
> > creating art, at least in my mind, although not in the eyes of the
> > law. Most of the graffiti that appears in my neighborhood is not
> > very aesthetically pleasing, but some of it is truly thought
> > provoking. Some of the graffiti in my neighborhood is done at the
> > invitation of the property owner. But that aside, since when does
> > graffiti create the need to shoot its creators?
> >
> > Years ago I used to read the National Enquirer because I found it
> > humorous, that was, until I realized some people took it
> > seriously. This article reminds me that some people believe
> > anything they read.
> >
> > Jean King
> > Houston, Texas
> >
> > On Aug 26, 2008, at 8:39 AM, Shannon McGraw wrote:
> >
> >> I remember a while ago, a discussion on graffiti. Taggers are now
> >> killing people that try to stop them. I may be the only conservative
> >> art teacher in America..but at the time, I said graffiti is not to be
> >> admired and elevated to art. It's a crime, and giving crime a 'pass'
> >> only allows it to grow; hence the fact that many are embolden to kill
> >> those that try and stop them.
> >> Here's someone more articulate on the subject.
> >>
> >> http://townhall.com/columnists/DennisPrager/2008/08/26/
> >> on_shooting_tagge
> >> rs_why_conservatives_and_liberals_differ?page=full&comments=true
> >>
> >> Shannon McGraw
> >>
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go tohttp://www.getty.edu/education/
> > teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Tape Sculptures
> From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 13:07:41 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> Last year my students had a blast making tape sculptures. I think
> we're going to do it again, soon.
>
> We made a "howto video" here:
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1dKgjav5KPE&feature=email
>
> Becky
>
>
>
> --
> Carpe You Some Diem!
> Website: http://www.rebeccaburch.com
> Store: http://carpeyousomediem.etsy.com
> Network: http://www.linkedin.com/in/rebeccaburch
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: questions
> From: suzanne rowe <mtsuz@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 14:15:07 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> Hello All,
>
> This is my first year teaching art and I am new at
> this school. My duties are split between SpEd and Art. I only have MS
> students for two classes a week for 6 weeks twice a year (about 24
> hours total) and grade school students once a week for 4 weeks three
> times a year (approximately 12 hours).
>
> I did an art language and interest inventory
> the first day of class with my MS students. From the results of the
> inventory the previous teacher did not cover basic art language or
> practices, critiques, and from what some have told me did a lot of
> copying type work. I also had the students take some time to do a
> drawing exercise so I could see where their drawing skills are.
> For
> the most part they didn't have any concepts of shading, value, and most
> did not seem to possess even a basic understanding of drawing. This
> teacher also let his student run wild. I know that every class tries a
> new teacher, I have been teaching in SpEd for 5 years. But these guys
> have been trained to think they do not have to pay attention or listen
> to instructions. I was initially told my class sizes would be 15 but
> they are 25, a big difference for instruction purposes, especially for
> new concepts.
>
> My
> question is does anyone have any suggestions on lesson plans or books
> that I could use as resources to get this group going from the ground
> up? I would like to start with drawing skills; my feeling is that a
> good drawing foundation is the basic for all art application. I am not
> fond of drawing but over the years and through my education have come
> to the conclusion it is necessary to become a proficient artist. My
> areas of interest and expertise lie in functional ceramics and abstract
> painting. I did let the MS principal know of my findings. From her
> response I would say that is why they have a new art teacher, the admin
> was aware of this situation.
>
> Not having a
> full year every day of art class is a new concept for me. I student
> taught in a class that met every day for MS-High school and once a week
> all year long for GS. How does one cram all the things students need to
> know into such a short time frame?! =) I know a lot of you face this
> situation. Any help, advice, and suggestions would be greatly
> appreciated.
>
> One other thought also, I am looking to implement art history
> into the lessons for 7th and 8th graders. In Montana, from my
> experience, most art history is taught in these grades. Does anyone
> have suggestions on a suitable curriculum book for this purpose? I
> talked to our curriculum person and there is none in place that she
> knows of. I have done some research online and some programs look very
> promising, but until you try them, get feed back on them it is
> sometimes hard to tell how efficient they really are.
>
> Thank
> you all in advance.
> Suzanne M. Rowe
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Fw: first day of school assessments and georgio o'keefe
> From: Christina Carroll <chrisinitalia@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 14:27:55 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
>
>
> i am really nervous starting school. i will be teaching 8th grade in a public school ( taught years in a private school) . it was suggested that i give an assessment to start off the year. i am looking for an interesting art assessment, never given one before. also does anyone have any lesson plans using clay and Giorgio O'Keeffe?
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: interesting article..
> From: mwhiteec@cablemodem.com.ec
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 17:09:31 -0500 (ECT)
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> I don't think I've ever seen the original poster of this article contribute in a positive
> manner to our forum. It seems it's always an extreme article full of hatred. Consider her a
> troll.
>
> Maggie
>
> > Where does this incredible hate/anger come
> > from?
> >
> > Gayle
> >
> >
> > On Aug 31, 2008, at 6:25 AM, Jean King wrote:
> >
> >> For several days I have been thinking about the very disturbing
> >> article that you mentioned as being "articulate on the subject" of
> >> graffiti.
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: questions
> From: "deb m." <artistpunk@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 18:29:17 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
> The Art Teachers Book of Lists is an invaluable resource for first
> year teachers.....
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Fw: first day of school assessments and georgio o'keefe
> From: Juile Jacobusse <jacobusse@charter.net>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 19:44:54 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
> One neat pre and post assessment I did before was to have students draw
> a self portrait at the beg. of the year and then one at the end of the
> year and compared and contrasted them to see their growth.
>
> Christina Carroll wrote:
> > i am really nervous starting school. i will be teaching 8th grade in a public school ( taught years in a private school) . it was suggested that i give an assessment to start off the year. i am looking for an interesting art assessment, never given one before. also does anyone have any lesson plans using clay and Giorgio O'Keeffe?
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: interesting article..
> From: Gayle Parent <gayleparent@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 17:11:53 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
> OK! : )
>
> Gayle
>
>
> On Aug 31, 2008, at 3:09 PM, mwhiteec@cablemodem.com.ec wrote:
>
> > I don't think I've ever seen the original poster of this article
> > contribute in a positive
> > manner to our forum. It seems it's always an extreme article full
> > of hatred. Consider her a
> > troll.
> >
> > Maggie
> >
> >> Where does this incredible hate/anger come
> >> from?
> >>
> >> Gayle
> >>
> >>
> >> On Aug 31, 2008, at 6:25 AM, Jean King wrote:
> >>
> >>> For several days I have been thinking about the very disturbing
> >>> article that you mentioned as being "articulate on the subject" of
> >>> graffiti.
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: My apologies
> From: Gayle Parent <gayleparent@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 17:22:14 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 14
>
> My apologies for that last post. Obviously it was an error. Live
> and learn.
>
> Gayle
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: questions
> From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 17:59:25 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 15
>
>
> Suzanne,
>
> All hope is not lost.
>
> Since they lack an art vocabulary you might consider looking for posters in art supply books that show examples of the Elements and Principles of Design. They have great drawing, painting, ceramic, collage, printmaking posters that also have art vocabulary attached. Having these up and around for students to reference to is important. They also provide a visual reference when you use these words in class.
>
> There are great DVD's that cover the same subjects.
>
> As far as starting with a base drawing lesson I would suggest maybe look at line development exercises: contour lines, blind contour, crosshatching, thick, thin, directional line, perspective (MS students). Using shapes and develop them into actual objects, using shapes to develop forms (shading/simulated texture can be introduced here). You are teaching drawing but breaking it down into its simplest form.
>
> Since art was not taken seriously before you have that "mind set" to change. This is where you need to show them what kind of art you can do. Seeing that you produce art lends an air of value to you as the teacher.
>
> Show them what other MS students have done in art classes. Pull things from the internet as motivation or inspiration to strive to do good work. Assure them you can take them on a great journey to find their artistic talent.
>
> MS students (boys) particularly need hands on construction work to do. Cardboard constructions, ceramics, machines etc.
>
> Connect your Art History/Cultural Art History to information and project making. African Mask using cardboard, Ceramic Vessels using Southwestern Native American Styles, Portraits using Van Goghs color mixing technique,
> Chinese Brush painting etc. The list goes on. The key I found with art history is connect it to a art making experience.
>
> Jeff (Minnesota)
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Voice Thread. Have you tried it?
> From: occasm@aol.com
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 21:00:03 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 16
>
> Hello,
> I've been away for a while due more to the fact that my aol would
> bounce back posts. Working with a new setup now. So hopefully I am back.
> Last Spring I took a tech workshop and was introduced to Voice
> Thread. It seems like a wonderful tool and if you haven't heard about
> it's certainly worth a look.
> With this site you can post artwork and have students post feedback
> and comments. They can even use their cellphone to post comments. I
> hate gimmicky stuff but it might make critiques more fun. Especially in
> the middle grades.
> See it at:
> http://voicethread.com/
>
>
> Mike Sacco
> Paul J. Gelinas JHS
> Setauket, Ny
> http://www.3villagecsd.k12.ny.us/artsgelinas/index.htm
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Voice Thread. Have you tried it?
> From: play2cre8 <play2cre8@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 21:21:19 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 17
>
> I used Voicethread with my students last Spring - there were some
> glitches, and some things I wish I could monitor (like our
> wikispaces), but it was fun for them to use... and several went home
> and did it themselves for personal/family projects... so I guess it
> was a success.
> When I took the class to the lab to upload we couldn't sign on at the
> same time... just locked up, either from our end or theirs... but we
> could record/text as a group when I introduced it to the class.
> Very easy to use - I paid $60 for a private Voicethread...I didn't
> want everyone to be able to see it - the kids were still lax about
> what they put on... too much information!
> I would probably sign in as myself and let little kids 'talk' through
> my sign-in.... I had all of my 7th graders do a visual griot project -
> have fun with it -
>
> On Sun, Aug 31, 2008 at 9:00 PM, <occasm@aol.com> wrote:
> > Hello,
> > I've been away for a while due more to the fact that my aol would bounce
> > back posts. Working with a new setup now. So hopefully I am back.
> > Last Spring I took a tech workshop and was introduced to Voice Thread. It
> > seems like a wonderful tool and if you haven't heard about it's certainly
> > worth a look.
> > With this site you can post artwork and have students post feedback and
> > comments. They can even use their cellphone to post comments. I hate
> > gimmicky stuff but it might make critiques more fun. Especially in the
> > middle grades.
> > See it at:
> > http://voicethread.com/
> >
> >
> > Mike Sacco
> > Paul J. Gelinas JHS
> > Setauket, Ny
> > http://www.3villagecsd.k12.ny.us/artsgelinas/index.htm
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: many eyes
> From: play2cre8 <play2cre8@gmail.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 21:26:24 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 18
>
> the New York Times had a very interesting article about the Watson
> Research Center at IBM and their 'many eyes' website -
>
> http://www.nytimes.com/2008/08/31/technology/31novel.html?scp=1&sq=many%20eyes&st=cse
>
>
> visualizing information - I wish I had known this could have been a
> career - I think I would have liked it!
> Enjoy
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: questions
> From: trish ackerman <dacke8175@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sun, 31 Aug 2008 20:28:30 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 19
>
> If they are lacking in basic drawing skills, you could open each class with a sketching for 8 min and explain to them how to get started, concentrate on texture one day, shading another, overlapping..... etc. I do this with all my classes since not everyone comes in at the same time and it sets a good tone for the class.
>
> Trish Ackerman
> http://artisticjourneys-trish.blogspot.com/
> Core Knowledge Charter School Middle School Art,Parker, Colorado
>
>
> --- On Sun, 8/31/08, suzanne rowe <mtsuz@yahoo.com> wrote:
> From: suzanne rowe <mtsuz@yahoo.com>
> Subject: [teacherartexchange] questions
> To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> Date: Sunday, August 31, 2008, 3:15 PM
>
> Hello All,
>
> This is my first year teaching art and I am new at
> this school. My duties are split between SpEd and Art. I only have MS
> students for two classes a week for 6 weeks twice a year (about 24
> hours total) and grade school students once a week for 4 weeks three
> times a year (approximately 12 hours).
>
> I did an art language and interest inventory
> the first day of class with my MS students. From the results of the
> inventory the previous teacher did not cover basic art language or
> practices, critiques, and from what some have told me did a lot of
> copying type work. I also had the students take some time to do a
> drawing exercise so I could see where their drawing skills are.
> For
> the most part they didn't have any concepts of shading, value, and most
> did not seem to possess even a basic understanding of drawing. This
> teacher also let his student run wild. I know that every class tries a
> new teacher, I have been teaching in SpEd for 5 years. But these guys
> have been trained to think they do not have to pay attention or listen
> to instructions. I was initially told my class sizes would be 15 but
> they are 25, a big difference for instruction purposes, especially for
> new concepts.
>
> My
> question is does anyone have any suggestions on lesson plans or books
> that I could use as resources to get this group going from the ground
> up? I would like to start with drawing skills; my feeling is that a
> good drawing foundation is the basic for all art application. I am not
> fond of drawing but over the years and through my education have come
> to the conclusion it is necessary to become a proficient artist. My
> areas of interest and expertise lie in functional ceramics and abstract
> painting. I did let the MS principal know of my findings. From her
> response I would say that is why they have a new art teacher, the admin
> was aware of this situation.
>
> Not having a
> full year every day of art class is a new concept for me. I student
> taught in a class that met every day for MS-High school and once a week
> all year long for GS. How does one cram all the things students need to
> know into such a short time frame?! =) I know a lot of you face this
> situation. Any help, advice, and suggestions would be greatly
> appreciated.
>
> One other thought also, I am looking to implement art history
> into the lessons for 7th and 8th graders. In Montana, from my
> experience, most art history is taught in these grades. Does anyone
> have suggestions on a suitable curriculum book for this purpose? I
> talked to our curriculum person and there is none in place that she
> knows of. I have done some research online and some programs look very
> promising, but until you try them, get feed back on them it is
> sometimes hard to tell how efficient they really are.
>
> Thank
> you all in advance.
> Suzanne M. Rowe
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---

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