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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: August 09, 2007

---------

From: Ann Berman (aberman_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Mon Sep 17 2007 - 08:22:45 PDT


Hi,
I am no longer receiving the daily art digest. Could you please check my address and resend?
Thank you
Ann Berman
---------- Original Message ----------------------------------
From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest" <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Reply-To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Date: Fri, 10 Aug 2007 00:01:08 -0700

>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Thursday, August 09, 2007.
>
>1. Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 08, 2007
>2. Re: Photographs that have changed the world
>3. Re: Greek Mythology
>4. marbles in the bowl
>5. Free Eygptian materials
>6. Digital art software suggestions
>7. No more Free Egypt Stuff
>8. Setting up a classroom
>9. Monster Art Exchange Request
>10. High School Clay Sculpture Course
>11. Re: High School Clay Sculpture Course
>12. Re: Going to be gone for a few days? Edit your settings
>13. Re: Setting up a classroom
>14. Re: Setting up a classroom
>15. Re: High School Clay Sculpture Course
>16. Re: Leah~ Colorado Springs Art Teacher
>17. Re: High School Clay Sculpture Course
>18. Re: Setting up a classroom
>19. Apollo 10 transmit 1st color pictures
>20. book - artist in their studios
>21. Re: book - artist in their studios
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: teacherartexchange digest: August 08, 2007
>From: Ed Foster <elavinfoster@earthlink.net>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 09:56:43 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
>X-Message-Number: 1
>
>The first image of Earthrise over the lunar surface from the astronauts of Apollo 8.
>
>-----Original Message-----
>>From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>>Sent: Aug 9, 2007 3:01 AM
>>To: teacherartexchange digest recipients <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>>Subject: teacherartexchange digest: August 08, 2007
>>
>>TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Wednesday, August 08, 2007.
>>
>>1. Re: Photographs that have changed the world
>>2. Photographs that have changed the world
>>3. Re: Colorado Springs Art Teachers
>>4. RE: Middle School Curriculum Research
>>5. Greek Mythology...
>>6. Re: Greek Mythology...
>>7. furniture
>>8. Re: furniture
>>9. Book on Dean Mitchell
>>10. paintings discovered
>>11. Re: furniture
>>12. marble technique
>>13. Re: Greek Mythology...
>>14. Re: Greek Mythology...
>>15. Re: paintings discovered
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Re: Photographs that have changed the world
>>From: Patricia Knott <pknott_6@comcast.net>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 07:55:29 -0400
>>X-Message-Number: 1
>>
>>
>>On Aug 7, 2007, at 6:52 PM, Lucinda Shinn wrote:
>>
>>> I am making a list of "Photographs that have changed the world". I
>>> have pictures from the Vietnam war and Gettsburg. What photograph
>>> would you add? Lucinda
>>>
>>Lewis Hines- child labor photos
>>W. Eugene Smith -- Minamata
>>Eddie Adams -- Execution in Saigon
>>Muybridge's motion shots
>>the first pictures of human embryos ( not sure of the photographer)
>>
>>and not world changing - but I have to put in the still of Marylyn
>>from "the Seven Year itch"
>>
>>Patty
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Photographs that have changed the world
>>From: twoducks@aol.com
>>Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2007 08:12:00 -0400
>>X-Message-Number: 2
>>
>>
>>
>>On Aug 7, 2007, at 6:52 PM, Lucinda Shinn wrote:
>>
>>> I am making a list of "Photographs that have changed the world". I
>>> have pictures from the Vietnam war and Gettsburg. What photograph
>>> would you add?
>>
>>
>>May 10, 1969 in History
>>
>>Event:
>>Apollo 10 transmit 1st color pictures of Earth from space
>>
>>In 1946 a rocket sent back the very first views of Earth (White Sands
>>Proving Ground) in black and white.
>>
>>kathy douglas
>>k-3 massachusetts, retired
>>TAB Partnership
>>________________________________________________________________________
>>AOL now offers free email to everyone. Find out more about what's free
>>from AOL at AOL.com.
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Re: Colorado Springs Art Teachers
>>From: "leah rachlis" <leah@pcisys.net>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 07:27:55 -0600
>>X-Message-Number: 3
>>
>>Hi Sharon that's me - Leah who taught at GLOBE, I just registered my son at
>>Palmer (formerly Colorado Springs High School) so both my children are
>>enrolled in your alma mater!
>>
>>I can't wait to meet you!
>>
>>leah@pcisys.net
>>
>>
>>----- Original Message -----
>>From: "Sharon Henneborn" <henneborn@mac.com>
>>Sent: Tuesday, August 07, 2007 9:12 AM
>>Subject: Colorado Springs Art Teachers
>>
>>
>>> Colorado Springs Art Teachers,
>>>
>>> Ellen Silverman & I will be in Colorado Springs from August 15 to 21
>>>
>>> I am coming for 50th HS reunion
>>>
>>> I have lost the address of the art teacher in a private school who moved
>>> there from NY. We had many off-line discussions about joys &
>>> frustrations of teaching in Colorado Springs.
>>>
>>> Anyone going to be around during that time to sit and enjoy tea?
>>>
>>> respond off line please
>>> henneborn@mac.com
>>>
>>> Sharon ~ NJ
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: RE: Middle School Curriculum Research
>>From: "Karen Chilman" <kchilman@scsd2.k12.in.us>
>>Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2007 09:33:54 -0400
>>X-Message-Number: 4
>>
>>
>>
>>>>> "Judi Morgan" <judi.morgan@sgs.org> 7/18/2007 2:43 PM >>>
>>
>>
>>I am researching middle school art curriculums and would love to have
>>some input to the following questions:
>>
>>=20
>>How are your classes scheduled? (block, daily, trimester rotation, etc.) =
>>6th grade straight schedule, one hour per day for 6 weeks, 7th and 8th =
>>grade modified rolling block schedule...80 minutes per day, 4 days per =
>>week for 6 weeks ( the roll means you see the kids at different times of =
>>the day each day of the week. sounds confusing but is actually quite =
>>wonderful.
>>
>>How often does your curriculum connect with other subjects (i.e.
>>history/English, etc.) Many units are co created with other disciplines...e=
>>sp. social studies
>>What are the art requirements for your school? All grades, 6- 8 are =
>>required 6 weeks of art per year
>>Do you have an art club? yes
>>Do you assign homework such as sketchbook projects or...? no
>>What grades are included in your middle school? 6-8
>>Does the curriculum build upon preceding years or is each year
>>independent of the others? builds, but review is built in
>>Do you participate in competitions and/or exhibits outside of school? not =
>>many
>>Are you public or private? public
>>How do you assess? rubric, self-assessment
>>=20
>>
>>Thank you very much for your response to these. It will help me out
>>more than you can know.
>>
>>=20
>>
>>Judi Morgan
>>---
>>To unsubscribe go to=20
>>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html=20
>>
>>---
>>To unsubscribe go to=20
>>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Greek Mythology...
>>From: "Rie Create" <rie.create@gmail.com>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 16:22:42 -0400
>>X-Message-Number: 5
>>
>>Looking to teach Greek Mythology to high school students... in a
>>different way. Has anyone found a way to 'hook' the students on the
>>topic? Up until now I've taught elementary students... but they are
>>incredibly easy to enthuse ;-)
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Re: Greek Mythology...
>>From: Patricia Knott <pknott_6@comcast.net>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 16:52:41 -0400
>>X-Message-Number: 6
>>
>>
>>On Aug 8, 2007, at 4:22 PM, Rie Create wrote:
>>
>>> Looking to teach Greek Mythology to high school students... in a
>>> different way. Has anyone found a way to 'hook' the students on the
>>> topic? Up until now I've taught elementary students... but they are
>>> incredibly easy to enthuse ;-)
>>>
>>
>>Funny thing. I couldn't sleep this morning so I was making lists of
>>courses I would like to have in the art department. One was a
>>Mythology course.
>>I think a hook may be Joseph Campbell ( Hero with a Thousand Faces)
>>This website offers how Star Wars and Matrix fit into the Campbell
>>scheme.
>>
>>http://www.spookybug.com/origins/myth.html
>>
>>I could watch and watch the Bill Moyer's PBS interview with Campbell
>>over and over. It's too much for kids, but there could be wonderful
>>edited moments. Campbell in one episode, does talk about Lucas and
>>Star Wars
>>
>>The hook is the "archetypes" and there is a common underlying truth
>>through all cultures and ages. Look at comic book heros and see how
>>they correlate.
>>
>>Love the idea
>>
>>Patty
>>>
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: furniture
>>From: jjennifer west <jenniferjoycewest@yahoo.com>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 15:01:47 -0700 (PDT)
>>X-Message-Number: 7
>>
>>I know that this is a common question because I have
>>seen it posted before, but when you are putting
>>together an art room from scratch and have a decent
>>budget to work with, as far as furniture goes, what is
>>the best source/brand/etc. I have a grant for my art
>>room and want to make wise long-lasting decisions as
>>to how I spend it. this is my first year at the the
>>school and from what I understand, I can have some
>>"tough" students. I have heard a lot about
>>destruction of property and vandalism. While I am
>>obviously going to lay down the law and do everything
>>possible to be preventitive, I want to make sure that
>>whatever I buy isn't destroyed. I am mainly looking
>>at tables, stools/chairs, and a good drying rack. Any
>>help would be appreciated. Thanks! Jen
>>
>>
>> ____________________________________________________________________________________
>>Park yourself in front of a world of choices in alternative vehicles. Visit the Yahoo! Auto Green Center.
>>http://autos.yahoo.com/green_center/
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Re: furniture
>>From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 17:20:27 -0500
>>X-Message-Number: 8
>>
>>What age group are you shopping for? My primary classroom had much different
>>needs as far as opposed to my high school students.
>>~Michal
>>
>>
>>>I know that this is a common question because I have
>>> seen it posted before, but when you are putting
>>> together an art room from scratch and have a decent
>>> budget to work with, as far as furniture goes, what is
>>> the best source/brand/etc. I have a grant for my art
>>> room and want to make wise long-lasting decisions as
>>> to how I spend it. this is my first year at the the
>>> school and from what I understand, I can have some
>>> "tough" students. I have heard a lot about
>>> destruction of property and vandalism. While I am
>>> obviously going to lay down the law and do everything
>>> possible to be preventitive, I want to make sure that
>>> whatever I buy isn't destroyed. I am mainly looking
>>> at tables, stools/chairs, and a good drying rack. Any
>>> help would be appreciated. Thanks! Jen
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Book on Dean Mitchell
>>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 16:31:10 -0600
>>X-Message-Number: 9
>>
>>from: Alice Thorson, art critic Kansas City Star
>>
>>As exposure goes, Dean Mitchell is having a stellar summer. In mid-=20
>>May he opened an exhibit of new work, =93Celebrating New Orleans,=94 at =20=
>>
>>Bryant Galleries in New Orleans. Now Mitchell is working out the =20
>>details for one-person museum shows at the Cornell Museum in Delray, =20
>>Fla., and the Canton Museum of Art in Canton, Ohio.
>>
>>But the most gratifying recognition of his life and work is a new =20
>>children=92s book, Against All Odds: Artist Dean Mitchell=92s Story, by =20=
>>
>>Betty R. James.
>>
>>=93The lady who wrote it is from my hometown (of Quincy, Fla.),=94 =20
>>Mitchell said. =93She=92s a teacher and her husband is superintendent of =
>>=20
>>schools in the Gadsden County area. She was taken by my whole story =20
>>and thought it was pretty miraculous.=94
>>
>>=93I grew up in Pepper Hill,=94 Mitchell said, =93a poor section where =
>>art =20
>>was not looked on by anybody as a way of making a living. I=92m such an =20=
>>
>>unlikely candidate to have gotten this far in the art world.=94
>>
>>Father & Son Publishing in Tallahassee, Fla., will release the book =20
>>soon, Mitchell said.
>>
>>But he won=92t be in Kansas City when it comes out.
>>
>>This summer Mitchell sold his house in Kansas. He will be settling =20
>>permanently in Tampa, Fla., to be closer to family and his Southern =20
>>roots.
>>
>>
>>
>>For a link to the publisher: http://www.fatherson.com/=20
>>book_details.asp?id=3D25959
>>
>> =
>>Woody
>>
>>For those who have not heard of Dean Mitchell:
>>
>>http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/studio/studio_artist.asp?artistid=3D45
>>
>>and his art:
>>
>>http://www.greenwichworkshop.com/thumbnails/default.asp?=20
>>a=3D45&detailtype=3Dartist
>>
>>
>>Read My Blog:
>>http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog/July07.html#NewestEntry
>>
>>Woody Duncan
>>woodyduncan@comcast.net
>>
>>January 19, 2009 Be Patience America
>>
>>Join the Campaign Now
>>John Edwards for President
>>http://johnedwards.com/splash/
>>
>>Read My Blog:
>>http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog/July07.html#NewestEntry
>>
>>Woody Duncan
>>woodyduncan@comcast.net
>>
>>January 19, 2009 Be Patience America
>>
>>Join the Campaign Now
>>John Edwards for President
>>http://johnedwards.com/splash/
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: paintings discovered
>>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 16:39:26 -0600
>>X-Message-Number: 10
>>
>>My High School finds two valuable paintings in the Social Hall. Read
>>the details on the
>>paintings above the fireplaces at Wyandotte High School.
>>
>>http://www.topix.net/content/kri/2007/07/valuable-paintings-not-for-
>>sale-kck-school-board-decides
>>
>>Woody Duncan
>>woodyduncan@comcast.net
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Re: furniture
>>From: jjennifer west <jenniferjoycewest@yahoo.com>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 15:49:29 -0700 (PDT)
>>X-Message-Number: 11
>>
>>This is a middle school classroom that is shaped like
>>a rectangle as opposed to a square. Thanks, Jen
>>--- "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com> wrote:
>>
>>> What age group are you shopping for? My primary
>>> classroom had much different
>>> needs as far as opposed to my high school students.
>>> ~Michal
>>>
>>>
>>> >I know that this is a common question because I
>>> have
>>> > seen it posted before, but when you are putting
>>> > together an art room from scratch and have a
>>> decent
>>> > budget to work with, as far as furniture goes,
>>> what is
>>> > the best source/brand/etc. I have a grant for my
>>> art
>>> > room and want to make wise long-lasting decisions
>>> as
>>> > to how I spend it. this is my first year at the
>>> the
>>> > school and from what I understand, I can have some
>>> > "tough" students. I have heard a lot about
>>> > destruction of property and vandalism. While I am
>>> > obviously going to lay down the law and do
>>> everything
>>> > possible to be preventitive, I want to make sure
>>> that
>>> > whatever I buy isn't destroyed. I am mainly
>>> looking
>>> > at tables, stools/chairs, and a good drying rack.
>>> Any
>>> > help would be appreciated. Thanks! Jen
>>>
>>>
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>>
>>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ____________________________________________________________________________________
>>Fussy? Opinionated? Impossible to please? Perfect. Join Yahoo!'s user panel and lay it on us. http://surveylink.yahoo.com/gmrs/yahoo_panel_invite.asp?a=7
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: marble technique
>>From: "Foell, Marlyn@RHS" <FoellM@brevard.k12.fl.us>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 18:57:44 -0400
>>X-Message-Number: 12
>>
>>Could someone elaborate? Is this done in conjunction with glaze or could it
>>be done right on bisque? what cone?
>>thanks
>>marlyn
>>
>>Due to Florida's broad public records law, most written communications to or
>>from government employees regarding public education are public records.
>>Therefore, this e-mail communication may be subject to public disclosure.
>>
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Re: Greek Mythology...
>>From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 16:29:57 -0700 (PDT)
>>X-Message-Number: 13
>>
>>
>>Just a thought,
>>
>>Greek Mythology is one of those subjects that can grab
>>any student older to younger. The stories of how they
>>came about. The relationships they have with each
>>other. Its like a modern day soap opera. Using art to
>>give students visual representation of what they talk
>>about is vital. Maybe have students recreate the Gods
>>as they would be today: look how the Gods of the
>>Greeks represented how they idolized themselves to be,
>>how do we see ourselves today and how would that be
>>represented in Gods of today.
>>
>>Jeff (Minnesota)
>>--- Rie Create <rie.create@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Looking to teach Greek Mythology to high school
>>> students... in a
>>> different way. Has anyone found a way to 'hook' the
>>> students on the
>>> topic? Up until now I've taught elementary
>>> students... but they are
>>> incredibly easy to enthuse ;-)
>>>
>>> ---
>>> To unsubscribe go to
>>>
>>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>____________________________________________________________________________________
>>Sick sense of humor? Visit Yahoo! TV's
>>Comedy with an Edge to see what's on, when.
>>http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/222
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Re: Greek Mythology...
>>From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
>>Date: Wed, 8 Aug 2007 20:26:16 -0500
>>X-Message-Number: 14
>>
>>Not suitable for school, but a good tie-in is the new movie "300". The
>>history channel has a video on "300" that is school appropriate, and while
>>not art related, would be a good background video to show.
>>~Michal
>>
>>> Just a thought,
>>>
>>> Greek Mythology is one of those subjects that can grab
>>> any student older to younger. The stories of how they
>>> came about. The relationships they have with each
>>> other. Its like a modern day soap opera. Using art to
>>> give students visual representation of what they talk
>>> about is vital. Maybe have students recreate the Gods
>>> as they would be today: look how the Gods of the
>>> Greeks represented how they idolized themselves to be,
>>> how do we see ourselves today and how would that be
>>> represented in Gods of today.
>>
>>
>>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>>Subject: Re: paintings discovered
>>From: Sharon Henneborn <henneborn@mac.com>
>>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 00:23:10 -0400
>>X-Message-Number: 15
>>
>>That is cool Woody!
>>Sharon
>>On Aug 8, 2007, at 6:39 PM, Woody Duncan wrote:
>>
>>> My High School finds two valuable paintings in the Social Hall.
>>> Read the details on the
>>> paintings above the fireplaces at Wyandotte High School.
>>>
>>> http://www.topix.net/content/kri/2007/07/valuable-paintings-not-for-
>>> sale-kck-school-board-decides
>>>
>>> Woody Duncan
>>> woodyduncan@comcast.net
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>---
>>
>>END OF DIGEST
>>
>>---
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Photographs that have changed the world
>From: cans54@netscape.net
>Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2007 12:30:27 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 2
>
>I would consider any of the WPA photos thought provoking along with any
>Ansel Adams images to provide an environmentalist point of view.
>How are you planning on using the list?
>Cyndi (Illinois)
>
>
>-----Original Message-----
>From: Lucinda Shinn <lshinn38@yahoo.com>
>To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
><teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Sent: Tue, 7 Aug 2007 5:52 pm
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] Photographs that have changed the world
>
>
>
>I am making a list of "Photographs that have changed the world". I have
>pictures
> from the Vietnam war and Gettsburg. What photograph would you add?
>Lucinda
>
>
>
>_________________________________________________________________________
>___________
>Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story.
>Play
>Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.
>http://sims.yahoo.com/
>
>---
>To unsubscribe go to
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>________________________________________________________________________
>Check Out the new free AIM(R) Mail -- Unlimited storage and
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>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Greek Mythology
>From: June Covington <jcovington2@mac.com>
>Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2007 10:00:59 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 3
>
>I love using Myth (from all over the world) in the art room. You can hardly look at art history if you don't know the stories.
>
>This summer, I read a set of books by Dan Simmon: Olympos and Illium... absolutely great. Post-apocalyptic, battle of troy, shakespeare and proust. Probably okay for older high school kids. They are making the rounds of my son's friends. I can only recommend them as good fun reads, but it would be great to include them as summer reading for juniors.
>
>I always have a copy of Delaires (sp?) Mythology books in the room for my elementary kids to consult. Everyone looks at them.
>
>June Covington
>
>tree&leaf gallery
>http://www.cafepress.com/treeandleaf
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: marbles in the bowl
>From: "Randy Menninghaus" <india99@infionline.net>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 13:03:27 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 4
>
>I do not know if it is food safe. I find the glass marble melts and becomes
>part of the surface glaze of the inside of the bowl. Thye were most
>effective in clear glazed bowls that were made of white clay. I think it
>really made kids understand that glaze contains components of glass
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Free Eygptian materials
>From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 14:53:54 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 5
>
>Hi all,
>I have been busy sorting out the 'to be filled' pile....and have come across
>several copies of a large package that I put together when I ran a workshop
>last year called "Mummy-Mia!". The Egyptian art history handouts are
>appropraite for Grade 9/10 visual arts, as well as much younger grades (some
>sheets are blank masters for story writing in elementary school for
>example). Where I teach, Egypt is also in the grade 5 curriculum.
>
>I have at least 3 piles of materials, that I would rather send out to
>people, rather than just recycle.
>
>If you would like to receive a pile of paper in the mail....please e-mail me
>DIRECTLY at suestevens@rogers.com with your complete mailing adddress
>(don't reply to the list) FIRST COME, FIRST SERVE!!!! :)
>Please tell me what grade you teach, and then I can send you the appropriate
>package, and send someone else the rest.
>
>I will mail the packages when I am back at school (early September), but I
>will notify those who will get them.
>
>Sue
>Head of Visual Arts
>Woodstock Collegiate Institute
>www.tvdsb.on.ca/woodstock/art
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Digital art software suggestions
>From: leah@pcisys.net
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 19:09:35 GMT
>X-Message-Number: 6
>
>Hello out there -
>
>If anyone gets this message really soon (1:00 in colorado) I am walking
>in at 2:00 with a wish list for my new boss as to what software I want.
>
>So I plan to ask for CS3 - but I may need some back up suggestions!
>
>Please please please call me: 719 331 9332 with any ideas - I just
>learned about alice.com, which is a free computer animation package given
>away by Carnigie Mellon - how cool is that!!!
>
>Leah
>
>---------------------------------------------
>This message was sent using Endymion MailMan.
>http://www.endymion.com/products/mailman/
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: No more Free Egypt Stuff
>From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 15:48:26 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 7
>
>Sorry folks,
>No more free stuff right now. Seven packages in the end have been spoken
>for.
>Might have more later....and I have LOTS more sorting to do....
>
>Sue
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Setting up a classroom
>From: jjennifer west <jenniferjoycewest@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 16:13:18 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 8
>
>Sorry to bug, but I only had one response to my former
>question asking for more specifics about my situation,
>I thought I might give it one more try. I am an
>experienced teacher coming into a new public middle
>school. Students are 6th-8th grade, and there is a
>large sum of money from a grant just waiting for me.
>The art room is archaic and needs just about
>everything replaced. I want to start with tables and
>chairs, but am concerned about tales of destructive
>students. Apparently many of my soon to be students
>are quite fond of breaking everything and anything and
>are very creative in how they do so. Obviously this
>is an issue to be addressed on a larger level, but
>because of this, I am unsure of the type of furniture
>I should purchase. Is a steel table better than wood,
>or laminate? Should I buy stools or plastic molded
>chairs? I'm interested in hearing from people about
>thier experiences with students and art room furniture.
>
>
>
>____________________________________________________________________________________
>Choose the right car based on your needs. Check out Yahoo! Autos new Car Finder tool.
>http://autos.yahoo.com/carfinder/
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Monster Art Exchange Request
>From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 18:13:56 -0500
>X-Message-Number: 9
>
>I just spent the past 3 days in video conferencing workshops and I am ready
>to start school! The ideas are flying!!! Many of you may have participated
>in Monster Exchange. I am giving a call out to anyone who wishes to
>participate in this with me. While it entails hands-on projects in the
>classroom, there won't be any costs. My plan: Middle School art classes will
>create a 3-D (or 2-D if there is enough interest) monster using easy to find
>classroom materials (mainly recycleables). They will then write a detailed
>description of their monster, which will be swapped with another school. The
>students will create the new monster based solely on the written
>descriptions. IF you have access to Video Conferencing equipment (there are
>several ways this can be accomplished if you don't have the high dollar
>equipment but want to particpate - I can walk you through it, then we will
>connect for the students to share their monsters and to see how close they
>got. If you don't want to do the video conferencing part digital photos
>would be sent to me and I will post them (the original monster, the
>description, and the monster created based on that description) on a
>website. I would like to have this completed by Halloween. I don't have my
>numbers yet, but if most of it is electronic, if more than one school
>participates we can balance it out so all students participate. Flat work
>may be easier to manage for the first go-round, but I'm open to ideas. Let
>me know if you're interested! And if you're not "techy" don't be afraid to
>join in - this can be high-tech or low- it'll work either way!
>
>~Michal
>3-12 Kansas Art Teacher
>HS Digital Communications
>Technology Integration Specialist
>http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>http://spotlight.digication.com/maustin
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: High School Clay Sculpture Course
>From: "Margaret Angstadt" <mangstadt@rssu.org>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 19:15:31 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 10
>
>A new school year soon arrives, and I am teaching a one semester Clay
>Sculpture course (high school). I'm looking for ideas from all you
>who may teach this.
>In advance, I thank you!
>Peggy
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: High School Clay Sculpture Course
>From: jjennifer west <jenniferjoycewest@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 16:48:31 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 11
>
>If I assume that this is a beginner's class and that
>you are working in a ceramics studio with a kiln, you
>could structure the class is a variety of ways
>depending on drive, budget, your own famililiarity
>with clay, and the ability of your students. You may
>wish to start with some small projects exploring
>different building techniques such as slab, coil, coil
>and scrape, and combinations of these processes. have
>students sketch out plans for various projects such as
>creating a shoe, hat, or utalitarian object in slab
>form, then create a template in paper, and from there
>construct it in clay, etc. You could introduce
>different types of clay (red clay, stoneware, etc.),
>and various glazing techniques and products such as
>underglaze, slip casting, raku, etc. Or you may take
>the opportunity to do a class based on public artwork
>and use the course to create a sculpture for your
>school's courtyard, library, etc. This is obviously
>the more difficult way to go if you cannot rely on
>your students to follow through with complete help.
>I've done two different ceramic murals at two
>different schools, one with support, the other on my
>own. If you choose to do a project like this alone,
>just make sure that you start small. Don't be too
>abitious and you can taylor future classes based on
>that experience. Hope that helps.
>--- Margaret Angstadt <mangstadt@rssu.org> wrote:
>
>> A new school year soon arrives, and I am teaching a
>> one semester Clay
>> Sculpture course (high school). I'm looking for
>> ideas from all you
>> who may teach this.
>> In advance, I thank you!
>> Peggy
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>>
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
>
>
>
>____________________________________________________________________________________
>Yahoo! oneSearch: Finally, mobile search
>that gives answers, not web links.
>http://mobile.yahoo.com/mobileweb/onesearch?refer=1ONXIC
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Going to be gone for a few days? Edit your settings
>From: Jenna Kang <jkang@srvusd.net>
>Date: Thu, 09 Aug 2007 17:05:53 -0700
>X-Message-Number: 12
>
>Hi Judy,
>
>Did you get this message from me? I am not sure if my emails get delivered
>properly. Please let me know. Thank you.
>
>Jenna
>
>
>On 7/3/07 6:34 AM, "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Greetings TeacherArtExchange Members,
>>
>> I have received many "auto replies" this summer after I post. Folks
>> telling me they are out of the office for a few days.....
>>
>> Rather than send us auto replies each time we post, change your list
>> settings to receive the digest - or go on no mail while you are away.
>> I recommend digest so you can still see the conversations. Your auto
>> reply to the digest will not post as they have a Lyris command to
>> block those.
>>
>> Got to:
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/login.html
>> enter your email address and password.
>>
>> When you return, you can switch back to individual posts.
>>
>> Regards,
>>
>> Judy Decker
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Setting up a classroom
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 20:11:10 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 13
>
>jjennifer west wrote:
>
>>. . . Apparently many of my soon to be students
>>are quite fond of breaking everything and anything and
>>are very creative in how they do so. Obviously this
>>is an issue to be addressed on a larger level, but
>>because of this, I am unsure of the type of furniture
>>I should purchase. Is a steel table better than wood,
>>or laminate? Should I buy stools or plastic molded
>>chairs? . . .
>
>This response is not exactly what you are asking for, but it may provide some ideas and principles to consider in making the choices.
>
>E. Paul Torrance tells a story of a school vandal that was privately taken aside and given the responsibility of protecting school property. He says this student turned into a defender of the school and the vandalism problems were solved. I believe that when we design everything to be indestructible and damage proof, we cannot hope to teach the values of caring, of aesthetics, and of beauty.
>
>If for budget reasons, we select laminates, I believe it is more honest for them to be beautifully designed plastic that looks like plastic. This could include patterns and solid colors that are designed by good designers. To me, it is worse if plastic laminates look like wood, stone, or tile because they tend to foster pretence and visual dishonesty in the environment. Fake wood tables and vinyl sided houses are very unpleasant to me because they try to be what they are not. In my opinion there is enough fakery, pretence, and dishonesty in the our visual worlds and the art room should avoid it when we have the option to make a choice. To be dishonest in finance or in a resume is illegal. In relationships it is toxic. I think dishonesty is also toxic in our visual environments? I like working or eating at a table that shows the marks of previous users, so long as these marks are not the result of intentional damage or vandalism. All this previous wear and tear genera
 l
> ly adds character. Plastic looks best to me if it is handled by a good designer that does not copy other materials.
>
>Most public school lunch rooms have the design, acoustics, and furnishings to provide the ambiance of factory farms for animal feeding rather than places for civil discourse and having a pleasant meal with friends. I see many art rooms that are better. They strive to make a better statement about ourselves. At least we can have some nice pottery and other artwork in our environment. Those of us with gardens can have fresh flowers in an original vase on our desks in September---because we care about such things. It is part of what we teach.
>
>Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
>Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
>studio phone: 574-533-0171??
>http://www.bartelart.com
>http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
>"Art is me when I am myself." ... a kindergarten girl when asked, "What is art?"
>"You can't never know how to do it before you never did it before." ... a kindergarten boy working with clay for the first time.
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Setting up a classroom
>From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 17:20:31 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 14
>
>For many years I had desk in my room with flip up tops
>like drawing tables. These did not last due to wear
>and tear.
>
>I went to large rectangluar tables. The legs are
>adjustable so I can make them higher or lower
>depending on the types of chair I purchase. The tops
>are a very hard laminate that is almost impossible to
>carve in.
>
>I use to have stools but came to realize for students
>that cannot sit still they do not work well (they fall
>off them). So I bought chairs with a hard plastic
>seat and a back rest that hits the middle of their
>back. The legs are reinforced all the way around and
>in the middle and I made sure the feet do not come
>off/break off.
>
>I have a tile floor so the tables and chairs work
>well. They are five years old this fall and still
>look in excellent condition.
>
>I hope that helps.
>
>Jeff (Minnesota)
>
>
>
>
>____________________________________________________________________________________
>Sick sense of humor? Visit Yahoo! TV's
>Comedy with an Edge to see what's on, when.
>http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/222
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: High School Clay Sculpture Course
>From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 20:26:57 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 15
>
>>A new school year soon arrives, and I am teaching a one semester Clay
>>Sculpture course (high school). I'm looking for ideas from all you
>>who may teach this.
>>In advance, I thank you!
>>Peggy
>
>In my experience, live models in the form of animals, birds, lizards, people, etc. have always been highly motivational, teach observation skills, and avoids the need to copy. Hollow forms are first produced by wrapping clay over crushed newspaper cores that are shaped a bit like the animal body and taped into a form that is close to the final form. The paper allows shrinkage and does not have to be removed.
>
>For ideas of a more imaginary nature see these two sites.
>
>Abstract expressionism
>http://www.goshen.edu/%7Emarvinpb/lessons/express.html
>
>Surrealism
>http://www.goshen.edu/%7Emarvinpb/lessons/clanimal.html
>
>Marvin
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Leah~ Colorado Springs Art Teacher
>From: Sharon Henneborn <henneborn@mac.com>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 20:27:56 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 16
>
>Leah, I have emailed you off line but concerned you are not receiving.
>
>On Aug 8, 2007, at 9:27 AM, leah rachlis wrote:
>
>> Hi Sharon that's me - Leah who taught at GLOBE, I just registered
>> my son at Palmer (formerly Colorado Springs High School) so both my
>> children are enrolled in your alma mater!
>>
>> I can't wait to meet you!
>>
>> leah@pcisys.net
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: High School Clay Sculpture Course
>From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 17:35:51 -0700 (PDT)
>X-Message-Number: 17
>
>Peggy,
>
>If this is a beginners class then you would have to at
>least take time introducing them to ceramic
>techniques, clay types, tools, and glaze or painting
>techniques. Once those have been practiced and
>experienced you could move on to projects.
>
>You could base projects on realistic, biomorphic,
>structural forms. Borrow from the past; pilars,
>statues, bust, fountains, buildings etc. Looking at
>works from cultures: Japan, South American, Native
>American, African etc.
>
>Some possibilites.
>
>Jeff (Minnesota)
>
>
> ____________________________________________________________________________________
>Fussy? Opinionated? Impossible to please? Perfect. Join Yahoo!'s user panel and lay it on us. http://surveylink.yahoo.com/gmrs/yahoo_panel_invite.asp?a=7
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: Setting up a classroom
>From: BigCrab99@aol.com
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 21:56:45 EDT
>X-Message-Number: 18
>
>My middle school art classroom is set up with large wooden tables that seat
>four students. These tables are about 30 years old and still look okay.
>Tables that have cubbies for books underneath only provide kids with a place to
>stuff trash and wrappers! My students sit on stools that have wooden seats
>with metal legs. I like stools because they are different from regular
>classrooms.
>Two very important considerations for the art classroom are good storage and
> adequate sink space. I have two very large sinks with three spigots each.
>You'll need a good drying rack and space to store and dry clay projects
>under construction. It is also helpful to have extra worktables to accommodate
>your paper cutter, presses, or other supplies. A horizontal flat file for
>storing art prints is an asset too.
>Set up your classroom like a studio and treat your kids like artists! They
>just might rise to meet your expectations!
>
>
>
>
>************************************** Get a sneak peek of the all-new AOL at
>http://discover.aol.com/memed/aolcom30tour
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Apollo 10 transmit 1st color pictures
>From: "leah rachlis" <leah@pcisys.net>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 20:25:03 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 19
>
>wasn't that August 10... I seem to remember being in summer camp at the
>time...
>
>
>> May 10, 1969 in History
>>
>> Event:
>> Apollo 10 transmit 1st color pictures of Earth from space
>>
>> In 1946 a rocket sent back the very first views of Earth (White Sands
>> Proving Ground) in black and white.
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: book - artist in their studios
>From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 22:33:18 -0400
>X-Message-Number: 20
>
>Yea! School starts tomorrow! Just have to say it a few more times...=20
>
>Has anyone heard of or seen this book - it was mentioned in the recent
>Smithsonian. It was out in May -=20
>
>Ellen=20
>
>
>
>Artists in Their Studios, Images from the Smithsonian's Archives of
>American Art by Liza Kirwin with Joan Lord
>
>
>Artists in Their Studios offers a unique glimpse at the lives and studio
>spaces of more than seventy-five important American artists from the
>late nineteenth century to the present. With rarely seen photographs and
>primary source materials-letters, lists of painting supplies,
>handwritten notes, exhibition announcements, and other personal
>effects-from the Archives of American Art, this beautiful book brings
>the reader into each studio space, providing an intimate perspective on
>each artist at work and exploring topics such as artists working abroad,
>artists and their models, and the studio as a social space. A separate
>section containing complete transcripts of all of the supplementary
>materials further enriches this collectible volume. Among the artists
>featured are: Alexander Calder, William Merritt Chase, Chuck Close,
>Willem de Kooning, Richard Diebenkorn, Arthur Wesley Dow, Marcel
>Duchamp, Helen Frankenthaler, Louise Nevelson, Jackson Pollock, Robert
>Rauschenberg, John Singer Sargent, Andy Warhol, and N. C. Wyeth.=20
>
>The author, Liza Kirwin is the curator of manuscripts and Joan Lord is a
>curatorial assistant at the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian
>Institution=20
>
>
>
>
>----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>Subject: Re: book - artist in their studios
>From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
>Date: Thu, 9 Aug 2007 21:03:33 -0600
>X-Message-Number: 21
>
>The book is on Amazon.
>http://www.amazon.com/Artists-Their-Studios-Smithsonians-Archives/dp/
>0061150126/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-9945945-2181210?
>ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186714624&sr=1-1
>Used copies are available for $19.75.
> Woody
>
>On Aug 9, 2007, at 8:33 PM, Sears, Ellen wrote:
>
>> Artists in Their Studios
>
>Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
>Read My Blog:
>http://www.taospaint.com/WoodysBlog/July07.html#NewestEntry
>
>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>---
>
>END OF DIGEST
>
>---
>
 

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