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RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 18, 2006

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From: Heather Ryall (hryall_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Sep 28 2006 - 08:09:15 PDT


From: Lynne Ryall
Subject: Erasers?
I tell students to use their old lines to help them make their new
lines- they provide a framework for helping the students to see
proportion. If the students wish to use an eraser afterwards to get rid
of their old lines they may do so, but often it is better just to start
off sketching very lightly so the old lines form part of the texture in
the picture. I like the idea of using the blue pencil crayon. I'm going
to try that!

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2006 3:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 18, 2006

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Monday, September 18, 2006.

1. Erasers@#?$!
2. Re: Erasers@#?$!
3. Re: Favorite Art Supplies
4. Reminder to ALWAYS check links on IAD
5. Re: Erasers@#?$!
6. Re: Erasers@#?$!
7. digital artist demonstrating diverse talent
8. ambient noise
9. Sumerian art lesson
10. Re: ambient noise
11. Re: Sumerian art lesson
12. Re: Erasers@#?$!
13. RE: Sumerian art lesson
14. Story on line for Peace Day

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Subject: Erasers@#?$!
From: "leah from work" <leah@pcisys.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 09:15:21 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

> #1 ERASER - Staedler-Mars white vinyl. A good eraser is the best
> psychological defense against the debilitating fear of mistakes. I may
be
> best to teach students to wait until they have found the correct line
> before erasing. I saw this well illustrated in an early Picasso
> self-portrait.

I have been fighting the eraser wars for 6 years now - and this year I
have
started the ERASER FREE ZONE... I wonder if I am not making a big
mistake.

When I had regular pencils with erasers - (which were horrible anyway)
kids
squabbled over which pencils had an eraser - when I put out seperate
erasers
they were used for everything from mini footballs to nose and ear plugs
(don't ask).

I find they ruin the drawing surface anyway - and spend huge amounts of
breath explaining to my kids the benefit of drawing lightly - we even
start
EVERY project with a "light line contest" (who can draw so lightly you
can
barely see it).

Last year I discovered Ticonderoga 308 No. 2/HB big fat pencils which
come
with NO ERASER - and took this as a sign - that I should eliminate
erasers
from my classroom..

We have discussed various options for dealing with "mistakes" such as
incorporating it into the design - ignoring the offending line as it
will be
colored over later - and as the very last resort (the other side of the
paper!).

So far - there has been minimal drama, and my kids are starting to draw
lightly instead of digging into their paper with their pencils, and then

shredding the surface with the easers - but now I fear I may be
damaging
their delicate collective psyche by not allowing for mistakes....

any thoughts?

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Erasers@#?$!
From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 11:44:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Have them draw with blue colored pencil or crayon. The blue lines
fade into the picture when color is added much better than black. If
they really must, they can go back and add black lines later on, but
I've found that students really love this method. I learned this from
a lady who illustrates books and goes around to area schools to give
demonstrations. It works best if you start with a light-ish blue
(like cerulean) to do your sketching, then make darker lines (with the
same pencil) that you want to keep, then start coloring. She doesn't
commit to any lines until almost the final step, when she goes back in
with black (or sometimes purple) to add definition where it's needed.
By then, you can't find the mistakes. They've already melted into the
picture!

Hope this helps!

Becky

On 9/18/06, leah from work <leah@pcisys.net> wrote:
>
> > #1 ERASER - Staedler-Mars white vinyl. A good eraser is the best
> > psychological defense against the debilitating fear of mistakes. I
may be
> > best to teach students to wait until they have found the correct
line
> > before erasing. I saw this well illustrated in an early Picasso
> > self-portrait.
>
>
>
> I have been fighting the eraser wars for 6 years now - and this year I
have
> started the ERASER FREE ZONE... I wonder if I am not making a big
mistake.
>
> When I had regular pencils with erasers - (which were horrible anyway)
kids
> squabbled over which pencils had an eraser - when I put out seperate
erasers
> they were used for everything from mini footballs to nose and ear
plugs
> (don't ask).
>
> I find they ruin the drawing surface anyway - and spend huge amounts
of
> breath explaining to my kids the benefit of drawing lightly - we even
start
> EVERY project with a "light line contest" (who can draw so lightly you
can
> barely see it).
>
> Last year I discovered Ticonderoga 308 No. 2/HB big fat pencils which
come
> with NO ERASER - and took this as a sign - that I should eliminate
erasers
> from my classroom..
>
> We have discussed various options for dealing with "mistakes" such as
> incorporating it into the design - ignoring the offending line as it
will be
> colored over later - and as the very last resort (the other side of
the
> paper!).
>
> So far - there has been minimal drama, and my kids are starting to
draw
> lightly instead of digging into their paper with their pencils, and
then
> shredding the surface with the easers - but now I fear I may be
damaging
> their delicate collective psyche by not allowing for mistakes....
>
> any thoughts?
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Favorite Art Supplies
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 12:08:18 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Add Seral transfer paper to the list.....

I bought regular graphite and white (for transferring onto dark paper).
We did all of our planning on newsprint, then transferred to good
drawing paper.

The good drawing had no mistakes to erase.

Judy Decker

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Reminder to ALWAYS check links on IAD
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 12:53:44 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

For those who use Incredible Art Department (IAD),

This is just a reminder to ALWAYS check links yourself before using
them with students. I only check links to make sure they are not
broken - and I only check Incredible Art Resources section now. I do
not check lesson plans at all.

Some one found a link on a lesson plan that now goes to a pornography
site and notified me. Anytime you use a page or lesson and find broken
links or misdirected links - please notify me. I will remove them. If
you find alternate resources, let me know and I will add them to the
plan.

When you send me the notice, also include the lesson or page link so I
know which page to edit. If you need to use a page with students give
me at least one day's lead time.

Thank you in advance.

Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department (IAD)
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Erasers@#?$!
From: "bkramer(POP)" <bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 10:47:51 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

> I find they ruin the drawing surface anyway - and spend huge amounts
of
> breath explaining to my kids the benefit of drawing lightly - we even
start
> EVERY project with a "light line contest" (who can draw so lightly you
can
> barely see it).
**********************

As silly as this is going to sound to you, I used to use the words "very
lightly" and still get dark lines as well with my middle schoolers.
Someone
on this list many years ago suggested "whisper lines" and Lordy, THAT'S
what
they did...whisper, light lines. I know it sounds coo-coo but try
it...it
might work for you too. Bunki

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Erasers@#?$!
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 17:03:31 -0500
X-Message-Number: 6

I have never used erasers in my elementary classes. We draw with
Sharpie,
and mistakes are a chance for something exciting and new to happen. We
"practice" 2-3 times and then students choose their "best" one for their

final project to finish. I get frustrated waiting for kids to draw that
"perfect" circle, never getting to step two because they can't complete
step
one. They always have one that they are happy with. My perception is (at
the
elementary level) that students have an off-kilter view of perfection
and
will often get frustrated trying to achieve that idea. So no, I don't
think
you will damage their psyche by taking away their "eraser crutch".
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids

> So far - there has been minimal drama, and my kids are starting to
draw
> lightly instead of digging into their paper with their pencils, and
then
> shredding the surface with the easers - but now I fear I may be
damaging
> their delicate collective psyche by not allowing for mistakes....

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: digital artist demonstrating diverse talent
From: "Jen Ellis" <just.jen.ellis@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 19:29:10 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7

Hi Everyone-

This artist is one that uses digital in a way that combines all
different types of mediums and skills. This is the way technology is
moving.

http://gigxl.com/

This is a colleague of mine from undergrad. Anything 2004 and under
was done in school. 2005-2006 work was done at the corporate level.

He is concept to completion. Meaning he creates all scripting, 3d
animation, 2d animation, drawings, and video. He usually works with
musicians to lay a score. He combines all elements himself to create
the final product.

There is one project called "Mingus" which was an experiment using a
program to sync pre-made particles with live music.

Check it out. I'd preview before showing to students though. (some of
his stuff is for MTV and I am not sure if it would be "appropriate")
As you will see it is not just about scanning in some pictures and
popping in a few filters.

Oh and I am not trying to intimidate anyone. He had never even used
photoshop until 2001, and you can see how much he learned in
combination with other programs in a short time. But I guess-its all
about drive-if the student wants to create and has the tools-they will
learn.

(Videos require quicktime)

Enjoy-

Jen Ellis
Interactive Multimedia Artist
Continuing Medical Education
Cleveland Clinic, Ohio

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ambient noise
From: Eugenia Hess <jean1@dejazzd.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 20:17:40 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

I have a white noise machine with rain, ocean waves, etc .
I also have bird identifying tapes.
There is a lot of new age stuff available.
And surely there is a site online with short FREE clips of sound.
But I suggest you go ask the expert! The music teacher at your
school!!!

Jeannie in PA, k - 5

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Sumerian art lesson
From: marcia <marciadotcom@yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 17:47:00 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9

  Our social studies teacher wants me to come up with
an art activity/project that can complement their unit
on Sumerian culture. I have a lot of websites and
books about Sumerian art, but I'm having a little bit
of trouble coming up with an actual project. This is
for 5th grade level. Can anyone tell me about a
project they have done or give me an idea to start
with? Marcia Beckett, in Wisconsin.

__________________________________________________
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Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: ambient noise
From: "Rebecca Burch" <mamallama@gmail.com>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 21:01:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

I know Narada sells a lot of new-agey, ambient stuff.
Becky

On 9/18/06, Eugenia Hess <jean1@dejazzd.com> wrote:
> I have a white noise machine with rain, ocean waves, etc .
> I also have bird identifying tapes.
> There is a lot of new age stuff available.
> And surely there is a site online with short FREE clips of sound.
> But I suggest you go ask the expert! The music teacher at your
> school!!!
>
> Jeannie in PA, k - 5
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Sumerian art lesson
From: Gabrielle Bliss <Gabrielle.Bliss@mpls.k12.mn.us>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 19:12:17 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11

Hi Marcia,

If I am remembering right Sumerian Civilization was big around the time
of the invention of writing. Since the
first wwriting was done on clay tablets we made clay tablets. You could
even carve an an animal into them- I'm
thinking of the Sumerian gates in the Louvre. (Great pics to show)

Gabrielle in Minnesota

----- Original Message -----
From: marcia <marciadotcom@yahoo.com>
Date: Monday, September 18, 2006 7:47 pm
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Sumerian art lesson

>
> Our social studies teacher wants me to come up with
> an art activity/project that can complement their unit
> on Sumerian culture. I have a lot of websites and
> books about Sumerian art, but I'm having a little bit
> of trouble coming up with an actual project. This is
> for 5th grade level. Can anyone tell me about a
> project they have done or give me an idea to start
> with? Marcia Beckett, in Wisconsin.
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Erasers@#?$!
From: Maggie Tucker <arttucker@earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 20:19:41 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12

I tried this years ago., for a few projects. My obsessive-compulsives
almost died. I even trotted out some of da Vinci's work to show, but to
no
avail. Since I only have one class for year-long (at eighth grade),
they're the ones who really have time to develop ideas fully.
Otherwise,
the erasers won for the nine-week sections.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Sumerian art lesson
From: "KPRS2" <kprs2@earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 21:31:06 -0400
X-Message-Number: 13

Look up ziggurat, cuneiform, votive figures and cylindar seals. If you
have
access to clay/firing then I would do the votive figures and would give
the
cylindar seals a go.

San D

-----Original Message-----
From: marcia [mailto:marciadotcom@yahoo.com]
Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 8:47 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: [teacherartexchange] Sumerian art lesson

  Our social studies teacher wants me to come up with
an art activity/project that can complement their unit
on Sumerian culture. I have a lot of websites and
books about Sumerian art, but I'm having a little bit
of trouble coming up with an actual project. This is
for 5th grade level. Can anyone tell me about a
project they have done or give me an idea to start
with? Marcia Beckett, in Wisconsin.

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Story on line for Peace Day
From: <hollingsworth005@bellsouth.net>
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2006 23:48:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14
My school librarian sent me this link to an online story site that has
When Pigasso Met Mootisse.
http://www.storylineonline.net/     She will be using it this week to
correlate with the students doing pinwheels in my class. The reader does
a great job with the story and its about getting along! It helps to show
a  non-political slant to the Pinwheels project. My students and faculty
have really embraced the project this year and we are looking forward to
a sunny Thursday!
              Jeryl in SC
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