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RE: [teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 26, 2006

---------

From: Shannon McGraw (smcgraw_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Sep 27 2006 - 13:07:23 PDT


As far as the floral design...why not have an assignment that has
objectives like 'urban design'...using urban 'non-flowers' in a creative
way? Or could you even have them make up flowers and do drawings as
opposed to actually doing a floral arrangement? Maybe an assignment
could be 'a floral center piece ala.......' Mondrian or a Fauvist ????
I dunno.....just throwing some crazy ideas out there.
Shannon

-----Original Message-----
From: Vikki Hillis [mailto:ullasina@cablelynx.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 2:07 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: RE:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September
26, 2006

To Lynette (re: floral design)
If the floral design course is already approved, why not spend your
energies
turning it into a fabulous design course rather than fighting it.
Of course funding issues may be a problem, will the floral course take
needed funds away from other arts courses? If that is not the reason
for the fight then support and envision the possibilities. As already
mentioned floral arranging is an ancient art, rich and diverse from
cultural
and
historical perspectives and practice. The kind of thinking involved in
floral arranging is that kind of thinking which is involved in doing
fine
arts, studio,
critical, historical, and aesthetic. The design problem and solutions
applied to successful flower arranging are those used in many studio
design
assignments.
This list could go on and on, but I think the point is, that if this
course
is going to be a reality make it amazing, who knows what students might
find
their way
to the arts through this unusual avenue.
sincerely,
Vikki Hillis
UALR liberal studies

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, September 27, 2006 2:00 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 26, 2006

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, September 26, 2006.

1. Re: Centerpieces
2. predicting who would be a good teacher
3. new image transfer method: w/c
4. ] Re: Re: Input wanted on "blue clouds", triangle mountains, lollipop
trees
5. testing
6. HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING
7. Re: non VAPA class
8. RE: HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING
9. RE: HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING
10. RE: HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING
11. dispositions of FAILING art teachers
12. Grants - Funding Alert - deadlines approaching
13. Re: dispositions of FAILING art teachers
14. resist method
15. Re: [SPAM???] resist method
16. Re: resist method
17. Re: non VAPA class
18. Re: non VAPA class
19. 2D to 3D design pictures
20. RE: non VAPA class
21. Re: non VAPA class
22. Re: resist method
23. Re: non VAPA class
24. resists
25. Thanks! new K-5 photography thank you
26. Re: dispositions of FAILING art teachers
27. RE: Centerpieces
28. Re: non VAPA class
29. Re: non VAPA class
30. RE: non VAPA class
31. tie-dye

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Centerpieces
From: judiej <judiej50@mindspring.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 05:19:05 -0400 (GMT-04:00)
X-Message-Number: 1

Flowers made from aluminum soda pop cans. Cut out the top end where the
opening is with scissors. Then cut the walls of the can about 1/4 to
1/2
inch wide strips and stop at the bottom of the can. Bend the strips
back to
create a starburst type of flower with the bottom of the can being the
center and cut strips radiating out from center. These can be painted
with
acrylic paints (I don't think tempera would stick.) Attach them to wire
or
wood (skewers) with glue or punch a hole for the wire and attach. Fill
in
with ornamental grass or some wispy greenery, and display in recycled
colorful bottles or clear glass bottles, or other containers like
baskets,
etc.

Good luck.

Judie J

-----Original Message-----
>From: marcia <marciadotcom@yahoo.com>
>Sent: Sep 25, 2006 8:11 PM
>To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] Centerpieces
>
>Thanks to everyone about advice on the Sumerian art
>projects.. I'm going to have the kids draw ziggurats
>in perspective and then also recreate the Standard of
>Ur in a large mural.
>
>I have been asked to have my kids make centerpieces
>for a school luncheon. Does anyone have any fabulous
>ideas for something striking, yet fairly simple to
>make? I am able to purchase materials if I need to.
>Thanks in advance! Marcia
>
>__________________________________________________
>Do You Yahoo!?
>Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>---
>To unsubscribe go to
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

Judie Jacobs
www.judiejacobs.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: predicting who would be a good teacher
From: <jean1@dejazzd.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 6:10:00 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

This reminds me of a time in my early teaching career when I had a
beautiful blonde student who asked a lot of "stupid" questions and acted
blonde to the max! My collegues and I wondered what kind of a job she
could possibly have when she grew up.

Turns out she became a marvelous teacher and was head of her
department!!!

No offense to all you blondes out there! From one who is blonder than
most,
Jeannie in PA, k - 5

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: new image transfer method: w/c
From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 03:59:29 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

This new paper, the Sheer Heaven, is also used as a
page in a sketchbook--simply tape it into place. Then
take your watercolor crayons such as caran d'ache and
scribble little patches of a few colors you would use
to sketch. Then voila--you have a traveling palette. I
have loved this for travel. However, I used the
parchment I could find locally. It didn't have the
furry quality which I think would really retain more
paint, and make the whole thing more rewarding. But it
was still good for a day of sketching.
Beth

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ] Re: Re: Input wanted on "blue clouds", triangle mountains,
lollipop trees
From: "Hillmer, Jan" <HillmJan@Berkeleyprep.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 07:30:36 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

Much like the "lollipop trees" I never understood till I moved to
Florida and saw palm trees - a lollipop shape - everywhere.
Jan

I always balked at the triangles that stood in for mountains until I =20
went to Costa Rica and saw the volcanic mountains that look exactly =20
like a triangle.

On 25-Sep-06, at 4:20 PM, Marta Pinto wrote:

> Hi Carol,
>
> Yes, some of the students also draw the sun in the corner of their
> papers, as they paint trees brown and green, ore draw houses as square
> with a triangle on top.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: testing
From: "Ann Wilschke" <awilschke@sjschools.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 08:41:49 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

Just testing.

Ann Wilschke
Art
Upton Middle School
St. Joseph, Michigan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING
From: "Ann Wilschke" <awilschke@sjschools.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 10:31:31 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

I have seen a great presentation on a combination pop-up card, 3d house
at the Michigan art ed conference.
I am wondering if any of you know what I am talking about and have
written directions. The folding is quite complicated. The item is made
out of tag board and I think it would be suitable for middle schoolers.
Thanks in advance!
Ann Wilschke
Upton Middle School
St. Joseph, Michigan

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: non VAPA class
From: <lpapanicolaou@pausd.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 07:45:44 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

Well, you could certainly get a lot of art history into it. I'm
thinking of
seventeenth century Dutch 'memento mori' paintings, the 19th century
'language of flowers', the Roman de la Rose, the history of sunflowers
in
art (yes, there is scholarly literature on this), tulipomania and
ikebana.
Not to mention that flower pollen has been found in Neantherthal graves,
indicating that floral design has been with us since before we were
fully
human. . .

Linda

---- Original message ----
>Date: Mon, 25 Sep 2006 22:56:35 -0500
>From: "lynnette diem" <ldiem@prodigy.net>
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] non VAPA class
>To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>
>My school curriculum and instruction just gave approval to a new course
>called "Floral Design and Production" for FINE ARTS credit. I am
trying to
>fight this as it should be a "Practical Arts" course not a Fine Arts
course.
>If anyone has any experience or suggestions to help our dept fight it,
>please let me know!
>
>LDiem
>
>
>---
>To unsubscribe go to
>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 10:56:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Ann - when I tried to do a search for pop-ups - lots of different things
came up - not much of what I was looking for -=20
I tried paper engineering and movable books - and was a little more
successful.
The pop-ups are based on simple folds - and then you make them as
complex as you want - older kids love them - I have done it with 2nd
graders too -=20

This page had some links with some directions, but I am not sure what
you are looking for -=20
http://www.deafhomeschool.com/study/crafts/pop-ups.html

does the house pop up - like a square off the page - or does it become
3D out of the fold when the page is open?

Look at the cover of this book - was it something based on this fold?
http://www.amazon.com/dp/0906212499/ref=3Dnosim/?tag=3Danotherpath1-20

Ellen

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 11:07:49 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

This site had movies of movable books - you might find something here
-=20
http://www.uleth.ca/edu/currlab/handouts/popupbooks.html

-----Original Message-----
From: Sears, Ellen [mailto:ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us]=20
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 10:56 AM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: RE: [teacherartexchange] HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING

Ann - when I tried to do a search for pop-ups - lots of different things
came up - not much of what I was looking for -=20
I tried paper engineering and movable books - and was a little more
successful.
The pop-ups are based on simple folds - and then you make them as
complex as you want - older kids love them - I have done it with 2nd
graders too -=20

This page had some links with some directions, but I am not sure what
you are looking for -=20
http://www.deafhomeschool.com/study/crafts/pop-ups.html

does the house pop up - like a square off the page - or does it become
3D out of the fold when the page is open?

Look at the cover of this book - was it something based on this fold?
http://www.amazon.com/dp/0906212499/ref=3Dnosim/?tag=3Danotherpath1-20

Ellen

---
To unsubscribe go to=20
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: HALLOWEEN CARD-POP UP HOUSE THING
From: "Sears, Ellen" <ELLEN.SEARS@Anchorage.kyschools.us>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 11:29:24 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10
Last one - promise...
http://www.popupbooks.com/
Ellen
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: dispositions of FAILING art teachers
From: Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 11:49:45 -0400
X-Message-Number: 11
There has been a good discussion of the good qualities and dispositions
that
predict a successful art teacher? This would be a good research project
for
a graduate student in art education.
What would happen if we would first try to identify the qualities of
failed
or failing art teachers (as terrible as this sounds)?  What would we
learn?
These kind of studies have been done in medicine with very insightful
results.  They zero in on what doctors do wrong, how they deal with what
they do wrong, their wrong attitudes, and their wrong insights into
their
roles as doctors.
You can google "Physical Genius" by Malcolm Gladwell.  In this article
he
describes what was done to decide which doctors would fail to make good
brain surgeons (for admission to the specialty).  They found that they
could
boil it down to one question in an interview.  "What mistakes have you
made?"  Those who said, "I have had some bad outcomes, but I have not
made
mistakes." were the failures who had lower skills and many malpractice
claims.  Those who said they had made many mistakes turned out to be the
best candidates.  They were the ones who continue to learn and improve.
After each surgery, those who know they make mistakes (the highly
skilled
and successful brain surgeons) replay in their mind what just happened
during the surgery.  They realize their mistakes, so they go directly to
the
lab and practice to avoid repeating the same mistakes.  They use rat
brains
to practice.  Those who do not bother to mentally take responsibility
will
never make the effort to do ext
 ra practice to improve their skills and avoid repeated mistakes.  They
never achieve the intuitive physical genius level of a good surgeon.
They
are failures.
As art teachers, how often do we replay the day or the assignment with
the
healthy objective of changing something about our approach to fine tune
or
reverse it to make it better?  How do we make notes of our ideas for
improvements or alternative methods to use the next day or the next time
we
use the assignment?  How often do we take a video of our teaching to see
what we look like to our students?  In our art training we all learned
to
fine tune or even reverse the course of our painting, and other artwork.
How well have we learned to do this with our teaching?
In another study, (recently reported on NPR) it was found that doctors
in
general who take two minutes more than average to talk to and listen
carefully to their patients had many fewer malpractice claims.  Even
when
they made mistakes they did not get sued.  Patients do not sue a doctor
that
they like.  Those that did not listen had many more malpractice claims
against them.
As art teachers, how often do we make a judgment before we have heard
the
student's intentions and frame of reference for the work.  If I could
take
back any moments from my teaching, it would be the moments when I said
something about a student work before I had tried to find out where the
student was coming from.
----------------------
Here are three art teachers I have known that were failures, each for a
different reason.
Reason 1:  BAD PERSONALITY.  The teacher was good at explaining art and
had
good learning assignments and projects that were based on good art
concepts,
but his personality was nasty and abrasive.  Children did not like him.
Many children were afraid of him.  The children from his school avoided
taking more art when it was an elective in high school, while the
children
from other art teachers in the same city took lots of art courses in
high
school.  He had tenure, so the  school system tried him at several
different
levels, but nothing worked.  After 15 or 20 years of being hated, he
found
another job.
Reason 2:  NO CONTROL, ORGANIZATION, OR ACCOUNTABILITY.  This was a high
school art teacher that collected a group of poorly motivated students
who
took the class as an easy credit.  Good students avoided her classes
because
the free and easy unstructured atmosphere in the class was not conducive
to
learning anything.  I do not know if she was a good artist.  She stopped
teaching after a few years.
Reason 3:  INARTICULATE EXPERT SYNDROM.  This teacher was a good artist.
He
had good intentions, good goals, but his assignments were too vague and
for
level and sophistication level of most of his students.  He wanted
creative
self-initiated ideas, so he did not wish to show examples; but he did
not
provide enough and skills practice prior to asking for an end product.
He
did not lead them through any structured methods of developing their own
concepts and ideas.  He did not have a strong vocabulary to articulate
the
approaches he wanted used.  Moat students felt lost, however a few
students
did very well.  He lost his teaching job after two years and worked in
another art related job.
Other reasons for bad art teaching:
I could list several other bad art teacher types.  Some of them are
terrible
in what they do to children and their minds, but kids like them and some
parents like them.  They like their jobs.  They have the impression that
they are good art teachers.  They happily teach until retirement.
Who are the art teacher failures you know, and why do they fail?  Can
they
change, or are they predestined to be bad?  What are some careers they
should have prepared for?
Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
studio phone: 574-533-0171
Essays on good art teaching:
http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
"An artist is me when I am being myself."  ... a kindergarten girl asked
to
define an artist
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Grants - Funding Alert - deadlines approaching
From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 11:50:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 12
Dear Art Educators,
These grants have deadlines that are fast approaching.
"Office Depot/SHOPA 2006 Kids In Need Teacher Grants"
The grants are available to fund projects that make creative use of
common teaching aids, approach curriculum from an imaginative angle,
or tie nontraditional concepts together for the purpose of
illustrating commonalities. Innovation and merit account for 40% of
the evaluation. Maximum Award: $500. Eligibility: K-12 teachers.
Deadline: September 30, 2006.
http://shopa.org/shopa_foundation/2006_teacher_grants/2006_teacher_grant
_app
.php?source=officedepot
"Grants for Successful Interactive Teaching Programs"
The Best Buy te@ch program rewards schools for successful interactive
programs they have launched using available technology. Winning te@ch
programs focus on kids using technology to learn standards-based
curriculum, rather than on teaching students to use technology or
educators using technology that children aren't able to use hands-on.
Maximum Award: $2,500. Eligibility: Accredited K-12 public, private,
parochial, and nonprofit charter schools located within a 50-mile
radius of a Best Buy store. Deadline: September 30, 2006.
http://news.publiceducation.org/t/5468/60120/162/0/
"Calling All Kid Inventors!"
CYBERCHASE, a PBS cartoon mystery series, is inviting kid inventors to
send home videos of themselves and their inventions to WNET as part of
MY BIG IDEA: CYBERCHASE Inventions Initiative. Maximum Award: selected
videos shown on the CYBERCHASE website and possibly TV. Eligibility:
kids ages 6-12. Deadline: Sept. 30th, 2006.
http://pbskids.org/cyberchase/big_idea/index.html
"Grants to Support ART AND MUSIC PROGRAMS"
The Airborne Teacher Trust Fund invites elementary and middle school
teachers to submit proposals for art and music programs that their
schools are unable to fund. Maximum Award: $10,000. Eligibility:
elementary and middle school  teachers in both public and private
schools. Deadline: October 1, 2006.
http://www.airbornetrust.com/index.aspx
"Recognizing Youth Community Service"
The Angel Soft Angels in Action Awards Program recognizes children and
youth who are performing exemplary acts of community service.
Georgia-Pacific, the makers of Angel Soft toilet paper, invites
teachers, parents, guardians, and friends to submit nominations to
honor "ordinary kids who are doing extraordinary things" to help
improve their communities. Maximum Award: $15,000. Eligibility: Youth
8 to 18 may be nominated. Deadline: October 1, 2006.
http://news.publiceducation.org/t/4842/60120/102/0/
CIRCULATED AS A PUBLIC SERVICE BY THE NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
"Grants for Music Education and Talent Development Programs"
The ASCAP Foundation is now considering proposals from organizations
engaging in music education and talent development programs that
support music education programs for aspiring songwriters and
composers. Maximum Award: $5,000. Eligibility: Organization must be
501(c)(3). Deadline: October 1, 2006.
http://www.ascapfoundation.org/grants.html
"Honoring Educators Who Unleash Entrepreneurial Skills"
The Leavey Awards for Excellence In Private Enterprise Education honor
outstanding educators who excite a commitment in their students to the
free enterprise system and unleash the entrepreneurial skills of their
students at the elementary, junior high school, high school and
college level. Maximum Award: $15,000. Eligibility: U.S. citizens or
permanent residents employed full-time as an educator at an accredited
American school (grades K-12), college or university. Deadline:
October 1, 2006.
http://www.ffvf.org/leavey.asp
"Grants to Improve Humanities Education"
National Endowment for the Humanities Grants for Teaching and Learning
Resources and Curriculum Development support projects that improve
specific areas of humanities education and serve as national models of
excellence. Projects must draw upon scholarship in the humanities and
use scholars and teachers as advisers. NEH is especially interested in
projects that offer solutions to problems frequently encountered by
teachers. Maximum Award: $200,000. Eligibility: county, city,
township, or state governments; public and state controlled
institutions of higher education; private institutions of higher
education; Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized);
independent school districts; 501(c)(3) organizations. Deadline:
October 2, 2006.
http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?oppId=10506&mode=VIEW
"National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipends"
National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipends support
individuals pursuing advanced research that contributes to scholarly
knowledge or to the public's understanding of the humanities.
Recipients usually produce scholarly articles, monographs on
specialized subjects, books on broad topics, archaeological site
reports, translations, editions, or other scholarly tools. Maximum
Award: $5,000. Eligibility: Faculty or staff members of colleges or
universities, or of primary or secondary schools, or independent
scholars or writers. Deadline: October 2, 2006.
http://www.neh.gov/grants/guidelines/stipends.html
"Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology"
The Siemens Competition in Math, Science & Technology recognizes
remarkable talent early on, fostering individual growth for high
school students who are willing to challenge themselves through
science research. Maximum Award: $100,000. Eligibility: High School
students. Deadline: October 2, 2006.
http://www.siemens-foundation.org/
Additional Grants can be found on this page:
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/news/NAEAGRANT.htm
List is provided by the NAEA.
Regards,
Judy Decker
Incredible Art Department
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/
Incredible Art Resources
http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/middle/
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: dispositions of FAILING art teachers
From: dianegregory@grandecom.net
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 10:13:57 -0600
X-Message-Number: 13
Marvin,
Like Carol, this discussion about dispositions worries me.  It seems to
violate
some civil liberties.  It also indicates that we know what good teachers
look
like.  I am not sure the research would support this.  It seems that the
dispositions are not based on research of good practice, but rather
expectations of certain professional groups and certain ideologies.  I
think
this needs to be made clear.  By calling them dispositions it gives the
impression that we "know" what makes a good teacher.  In fact, these are
just
standards that people feel teachers need to meet in order to meet
certain
professional standards.  I do not think this is one in the same thing.
I think a little honesty is in order.  In reality, these dispositions
need
to be
met in order to graduate, to keep ones job, and be regarded as a
professional in
today's standards driven world.  I would like to argue that being a good
teacher
has nothing to do with all this "stuff."  I think we delude ourselves
that
it
does and we will push some people out of the profession who would truly
be
bright spots in our profession because they find their own unique ways
to
succeed.
I guess I am not much of a standards person...I feel they are false
security
blankets.  They are comfort zones for a profession that is being blamed
for
the
ills of our children.
Give me one good study that indicates that these dispositions will
guarantee
a
good result.  Again, let us be honest with ourselves and our students.
These
represent our belief systems about what constitutes effective
preparation...we
can no more guarantee that these are good teachers than a man on the
moon.
Finally, I am not saying that standards are not useful.  They are.  They
can
help programs evaluate themselves.  They can help establish rigorous
programs
and help us raise the bar for ourselves...to use them as a way to
eliminate
people from a program...I am not sure.  To avoid this dilemma, I would
ask
that
"free spirit" and "risk taking", perhaps unconvential art teachers be
given
the
opportunity to identify their own unique dispositions that fall outside
of
these little categories.  All of this reminds me of studies that
indicate
that
many of our highly gifted and creative students end up in juvenile
detention
centers because they dare fight the system.  Where do truly gifted and
unconvential art teachers go?  Do they end up working at Wal-Mart?  This
is
a
potential waste.
Let us not take our own judgments and standards too seriously without
looking at
the overall implications of standards run amuk.
Civil libertarian and Hippy grown up,
For what it is worth.
Diane
Quoting Marvin Bartel <marvinpb@goshen.edu>:
> There has been a good discussion of the good qualities and
dispositions
that
> predict a successful art teacher? This would be a good research
project
for a
> graduate student in art education.
>
> What would happen if we would first try to identify the qualities of
failed
> or failing art teachers (as terrible as this sounds)?  What would we
learn?
>
> These kind of studies have been done in medicine with very insightful
> results.  They zero in on what doctors do wrong, how they deal with
what
they
> do wrong, their wrong attitudes, and their wrong insights into their
roles
as
> doctors.
>
> You can google "Physical Genius" by Malcolm Gladwell.  In this article
he
> describes what was done to decide which doctors would fail to make
good
brain
> surgeons (for admission to the specialty).  They found that they could
boil
> it down to one question in an interview.  "What mistakes have you
made?"
> Those who said, "I have had some bad outcomes, but I have not made
mistakes."
> were the failures who had lower skills and many malpractice claims.
Those
> who said they had made many mistakes turned out to be the best
candidates.
> They were the ones who continue to learn and improve.  After each
surgery,
> those who know they make mistakes (the highly skilled and successful
brain
> surgeons) replay in their mind what just happened during the surgery.
They
> realize their mistakes, so they go directly to the lab and practice to
avoid
> repeating the same mistakes.  They use rat brains to practice.  Those
who
do
> not bother to mentally take responsibility will never make the effort
to
do
> ext
>  ra practice to improve their skills and avoid repeated mistakes.
They
never
> achieve the intuitive physical genius level of a good surgeon.  They
are
> failures.
>
> As art teachers, how often do we replay the day or the assignment with
the
> healthy objective of changing something about our approach to fine
tune or
> reverse it to make it better?  How do we make notes of our ideas for
> improvements or alternative methods to use the next day or the next
time
we
> use the assignment?  How often do we take a video of our teaching to
see
what
> we look like to our students?  In our art training we all learned to
fine
> tune or even reverse the course of our painting, and other artwork.
How
well
> have we learned to do this with our teaching?
>
> In another study, (recently reported on NPR) it was found that doctors
in
> general who take two minutes more than average to talk to and listen
> carefully to their patients had many fewer malpractice claims.  Even
when
> they made mistakes they did not get sued.  Patients do not sue a
doctor
that
> they like.  Those that did not listen had many more malpractice claims
> against them.
>
> As art teachers, how often do we make a judgment before we have heard
the
> student's intentions and frame of reference for the work.  If I could
take
> back any moments from my teaching, it would be the moments when I said
> something about a student work before I had tried to find out where
the
> student was coming from.
>
> ----------------------
> Here are three art teachers I have known that were failures, each for
a
> different reason.
>
> Reason 1:  BAD PERSONALITY.  The teacher was good at explaining art
and
had
> good learning assignments and projects that were based on good art
concepts,
> but his personality was nasty and abrasive.  Children did not like
him.
Many
> children were afraid of him.  The children from his school avoided
taking
> more art when it was an elective in high school, while the children
from
> other art teachers in the same city took lots of art courses in high
school.
> He had tenure, so the  school system tried him at several different
levels,
> but nothing worked.  After 15 or 20 years of being hated, he found
another
> job.
>
> Reason 2:  NO CONTROL, ORGANIZATION, OR ACCOUNTABILITY.  This was a
high
> school art teacher that collected a group of poorly motivated students
who
> took the class as an easy credit.  Good students avoided her classes
because
> the free and easy unstructured atmosphere in the class was not
conducive
to
> learning anything.  I do not know if she was a good artist.  She
stopped
> teaching after a few years.
>
> Reason 3:  INARTICULATE EXPERT SYNDROM.  This teacher was a good
artist.
He
> had good intentions, good goals, but his assignments were too vague
and
for
> level and sophistication level of most of his students.  He wanted
creative
> self-initiated ideas, so he did not wish to show examples; but he did
not
> provide enough and skills practice prior to asking for an end product.
He
> did not lead them through any structured methods of developing their
own
> concepts and ideas.  He did not have a strong vocabulary to articulate
the
> approaches he wanted used.  Moat students felt lost, however a few
students
> did very well.  He lost his teaching job after two years and worked in
> another art related job.
>
> Other reasons for bad art teaching:
> I could list several other bad art teacher types.  Some of them are
terrible
> in what they do to children and their minds, but kids like them and
some
> parents like them.  They like their jobs.  They have the impression
that
they
> are good art teachers.  They happily teach until retirement.
>
> Who are the art teacher failures you know, and why do they fail?  Can
they
> change, or are they predestined to be bad?  What are some careers they
should
> have prepared for?
>
> Marvin Bartel, Ed.D., Professor of Art Emeritus
> Goshen College, 1700 South Main, Goshen IN 46526
> studio phone: 574-533-0171
>
> Essays on good art teaching:
> http://www.goshen.edu/art/ed/art-ed-links.html
>
> "An artist is me when I am being myself."  ... a kindergarten girl
asked
to
> define an artist
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
--
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Associate Professor of Art Education
Director, Graduate & Undergraduate Studies in
Art Education
Department of Visual Arts
Texas Woman's University
940.898.2530
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: resist method
From: "robin phillips" <robinmcp@hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 13:50:25 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14
Hi All-
Once again asking for help and picking your brains!  I have done resist
paintings in the past, but I never have much success.  I always seem to
need
to blot off the india ink or watered down tempera or watercolor because
it
covers the other media too completely.  I have used oil pastel and
colored
pencil as the media to be covered.  The students are instructed to press
hard and  leave space between the areas of color.  Is the choice of
paper
important?
Any light that can be shed on this will be appreciated.
Thanks in advance, you always come through!
Robin in PA
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: [SPAM???]  resist method
From: "Karen Chilman" <kchilman@scsd2.k12.in.us>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 13:58:17 -0400
X-Message-Number: 15
We use manilla paper and pastels leaving a space between the shapes. =20
I pour on the ink, they brush it on and I (with the gloves on) rinse it
=
off.  They then blot and put on the drying rack.  These works, which are
=
done after a gesture drawing and study of abstraction, are always a big
=
hit. EVERY student is successful!
>>> "robin phillips" <robinmcp@hotmail.com> 9/26/2006 1:50 PM >>>
Hi All-
Once again asking for help and picking your brains!  I have done
resist=20
paintings in the past, but I never have much success.  I always seem to
=
need=20
to blot off the india ink or watered down tempera or watercolor because
=
it=20
covers the other media too completely.  I have used oil pastel and =
colored=20
pencil as the media to be covered.  The students are instructed to =
press=20
hard and  leave space between the areas of color.  Is the choice of =
paper=20
important?
Any light that can be shed on this will be appreciated.
Thanks in advance, you always come through!
Robin in PA
---
To unsubscribe go to=20
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: resist method
From: dianegregory@grandecom.net
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 12:12:21 -0600
X-Message-Number: 16
I have students put magazines under their paper when laying down wax
crayon
for
good resist effects.  They do need to press down hard even so.  You need
to
have good crayons too.  I do use a heavy white paper.  Nevertheless, the
resist
technique doesn't resist completely.  However, this is part of the
process.
I
would show students to let the paint float over the crayon rather than
scrub
or
brush the paint into the paper.  I have seen many students scrub the
paint
on
and this is counter intuitive to the effects desired.  I believe
watercolor
paint should not be overworked to keep it fresh and to allow for the
paint
to
pool in various areas to get a variety of different tints and shades of
color.
Many students brush out the wonderful effects of watercolor and the
paint
becomes pretty flat.
Oil pastels and/or craypas work well too.  Tempera paint is not
recommended...Only watercolor paint.  I use Prang watercolors.  I think
these
are the best student grade watercolor paint sets.
I hope this helps.
Diane
P.S.  If you are trying to do a tempera india ink resist, then put 1/2
part
elmers glue (not school glue) in each container of tempera paint.  Use
colored
construction paper.  Also, dilute the india ink too...do not put it on
full
strength.  Check out the book, Emphasis Art...this process is explained
in
detail in this book.  Be sure to wash out your paint brushes thoroughly
since
they will have glue on them.  If you don't your brushes will need to be
used
as
recycled items.  :-)
Quoting robin phillips <robinmcp@hotmail.com>:
>
>
>
> Hi All-
> Once again asking for help and picking your brains!  I have done
resist
> paintings in the past, but I never have much success.  I always seem
to
need
> to blot off the india ink or watered down tempera or watercolor
because it
> covers the other media too completely.  I have used oil pastel and
colored
> pencil as the media to be covered.  The students are instructed to
press
> hard and  leave space between the areas of color.  Is the choice of
paper
> important?
> Any light that can be shed on this will be appreciated.
> Thanks in advance, you always come through!
> Robin in PA
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
--
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Associate Professor of Art Education
Director, Graduate & Undergraduate Studies in
Art Education
Department of Visual Arts
Texas Woman's University
940.898.2530
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: non VAPA class
From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 12:22:10 -0700
X-Message-Number: 17
one thought--sometimes when you teach a course that is called a career
oriented course there is
lots of moneys available for such courses.  Do you need a little boost
in the finances??
>>> ldiem@prodigy.net 9/25/2006 8:56 pm >>>
My school curriculum and instruction just gave approval to a new course
called "Floral Design and Production" for FINE ARTS credit.  I am
trying to
fight this as it should be a "Practical Arts" course not a Fine Arts
course.
If anyone has any experience or suggestions to help our dept fight it,
please let me know!
LDiem
---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: non VAPA class
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 15:39:38 -0500
X-Message-Number: 18
I am the NCA chair for my district. One thing that must be taken into
account is that in order for a Fine Arts Course to be counted for credit
towards graduation (state requirement) is that it must be taught by a
certified fine arts instructor. This keeps schools from having the
industrial arts teacher have students build a dresser and calling it an
arts
class. That might be your argument - if it is a fine arts course there
must
be creativity/art history/aesthetics involved, and is it being taught by
a
cerified fine arts instructor.
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> My school curriculum and instruction just gave approval to a new
course
> called "Floral Design and Production" for FINE ARTS credit.  I am
trying
> to fight this as it should be a "Practical Arts" course not a Fine
Arts
> course. If anyone has any experience or suggestions to help our dept
fight
> it, please let me know!
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: 2D to 3D design pictures
From: Julie Jacobusse <JacobusseJulie@bellsouth.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 17:11:37 -0400
X-Message-Number: 19
I sent out pictures of the 2D to 3D design lesson I posted on the art
exchange to those who requested them.  I hope I got everyone and that I
did not send out duplicates.  :)  Let me know if you recieved yours -and
if you have any questions.
Thanks,
Julie Jacobusse~Georgia
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: non VAPA class
From: "Duffey, Patrick G." <DuffeyP@Peninsula.wednet.edu>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 14:41:59 -0700
X-Message-Number: 20
Does anyone know if other states have the same requirement? I am running
into the same issue here in the state of Washington=20
-----Original Message-----
From: M. Austin [mailto:whest177@wheatstate.com]=20
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 1:40 PM
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] non VAPA class
I am the NCA chair for my district. One thing that must be taken into=20
account is that in order for a Fine Arts Course to be counted for credit
towards graduation (state requirement) is that it must be taught by a=20
certified fine arts instructor. This keeps schools from having the=20
industrial arts teacher have students build a dresser and calling it an
arts=20
class. That might be your argument - if it is a fine arts course there
must=20
be creativity/art history/aesthetics involved, and is it being taught by
a=20
cerified fine arts instructor.
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> My school curriculum and instruction just gave approval to a new
course=20
> called "Floral Design and Production" for FINE ARTS credit.  I am
trying=20
> to fight this as it should be a "Practical Arts" course not a Fine
Arts=20
> course. If anyone has any experience or suggestions to help our dept
fight=20
> it, please let me know!
---
To unsubscribe go to=20
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: non VAPA class
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 17:17:01 -0500
X-Message-Number: 21
I was told this by the Kansas Fine Arts State Department Representative.
Her
explaination on this was that with NCLB being a federal mandate and that
it
required all teachers to be "highly qualified". This is where the "fine
arts
certified" factors in, since all teachers are expected to be "highly
qualified" and so must teach only classes and grade levels in which they
are
certified in. Call your own state rep and find out if this is a
regluation
for your state as well.
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> Does anyone know if other states have the same requirement? I am
running
> into the same issue here in the state of Washington
> I am the NCA chair for my district. One thing that must be taken into
> account is that in order for a Fine Arts Course to be counted for
credit
>
> towards graduation (state requirement) is that it must be taught by a
> certified fine arts instructor. This keeps schools from having the
> industrial arts teacher have students build a dresser and calling it
an
> arts
> class. That might be your argument - if it is a fine arts course there
> must
> be creativity/art history/aesthetics involved, and is it being taught
by
> a
> cerified fine arts instructor.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: resist method
From: Ken Schwab <bicyclken@sbcglobal.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 15:27:42 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 22
I use crayons for a crayon resist.  They can be very good if they use
the
crayons heavily and mix them well.  You can see them on my website.
2003,
art 1, illuminations.  It must have a space left around the crayon.  Use
a
thick black marker when doing the design and then transfer to white
paper by
making a line on both sides of the marker line.  this will create a
double
line and thereby a space between shapes.  color the shapes with thick
crayon
and then paint the line with a lightly watered down tempera.  The  paint
will resist the wax and go into the shapes causing a stained glass
effect.
www.room3art.com
Ken Schwab
San Jose, CA
----- Original Message ----
From: robin phillips <robinmcp@hotmail.com>
To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 10:50:25 AM
Subject: [teacherartexchange] resist method
Hi All-
Once again asking for help and picking your brains!  I have done resist
paintings in the past, but I never have much success.  I always seem to
need
to blot off the india ink or watered down tempera or watercolor because
it
covers the other media too completely.  I have used oil pastel and
colored
pencil as the media to be covered.  The students are instructed to press
hard and  leave space between the areas of color.  Is the choice of
paper
important?
Any light that can be shed on this will be appreciated.
Thanks in advance, you always come through!
Robin in PA
---
To unsubscribe go to
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: non VAPA class
From: Jeff Pridie <jeffpridie@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 15:31:58 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 23
LDiem,
Can the class align itself to the Art Standard...does
it meet all requirements.....is it taught by a highly
qualified teacher....things to think about.
Jeff (Minnesota)
--- lynnette diem <ldiem@prodigy.net> wrote:
> My school curriculum and instruction just gave
> approval to a new course
> called "Floral Design and Production" for FINE ARTS
> credit.  I am trying to
> fight this as it should be a "Practical Arts" course
> not a Fine Arts course.
> If anyone has any experience or suggestions to help
> our dept fight it,
> please let me know!
>
> LDiem
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
>
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
http://mail.yahoo.com
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: resists
From: ejb35@columbia.edu
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 18:53:20 -0400
X-Message-Number: 24
Magic
I use beeswax candles. white or pale yellow. Any plain color candle
will do. When you work over them the lines are whiteish, of course,
but may be a good lesson for a first resist as students can easily
see what happens in the open, non-waxy space.
Jane in Brooklyn
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Thanks! new K-5 photography thank you
From: "Jen Ellis" <just.jen.ellis@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 19:04:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 25
Hi Pat
Can you have the students interview each other for a "self portrait"
assignment and then have then shoot an image that represents their
classmate. Then have the students present their image and in this way
they can introduce each other to the class.
Are the students using different speeds of film? Could you have them
do "action" type shoots and explain how the speed of film relates to
the capture of motion.
Can you purchase one underwater disposible? That could be fun. Fill a
huge aquarium with various objects and take some shots.
Have them create minature worlds and create pictures inside the rooms.
Photo scavenger hunt, but maybe each assignment is taking the image a
certain way using new vocabulary.
Maybe more later-
 Jen Ellis
Continuing Medical Education
Cleveland Clinic, OH
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: dispositions of FAILING art teachers
From: "Jen Ellis" <just.jen.ellis@gmail.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 19:28:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 26
This made me think of the teacher in H.S. that got kicked out of
school for teaching some liberal lessons........and the whole school
had a protest......
The teacher that got demoted in college that was "going crazy" because
he ran about the room shouting about how glorious our art was.
Two of the best ones. Made me think of a little "oh captain, my captain"
there.
The persectives of students, parents, organizations, communities,
fellow teachers........they would all be different........
Diane, were you the one that mentioned your school had some methods of
"identifying" students that needed guidance on being educators in a
previous post? I would be curious to read that......I am sure it is
quite controversial there. I wonder how many people use it.
Jen
Continuing Medical Education
Cleveland Clinic, OH
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: Centerpieces
From: cen_aca_dp <cen_aca_dp@nwoca.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 20:09:28 -0400
X-Message-Number: 27
>===== Original Message From judiej <judiej50@mindspring.com> =====
>Flowers made from aluminum soda pop cans.  Cut out the top end where
the
opening is with scissors.  Then cut the walls of the can about 1/4 to
1/2
inch
wide strips and stop at the bottom of the can.  Bend the strips back to
create
a starburst type of flower with the bottom of the can being the center
and
cut
strips radiating out from center.  These can be painted with acrylic
paints
(I
don't think tempera would stick.)
________________________________________________________________________
_
 There is a group in Ohio which makes centerpieces much like what you
are
describing. Perhaps you can get inspiration by looking at their site:
http://www.passionworks.org/products/flowers.php
Passionworks Studio, I believe, is in Akron, Ohio.
Denise Pannell
"Carry on, carry on, for the men and boys are gone, But the furrow
shan't
lie fallow while the women carry on." ~Janet Begbie
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: non VAPA class
From: <lpapanicolaou@pausd.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 17:18:12 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 28
My reservations about media-centered courses like these is that it's a
good
idea for a mini-class but I can't imagine flower arranging for an entire
semester.
An addendum to what I wrote earlier about the art historical tie-ins
that
could be done with this, I would say that the place for your department
to
draw the line is that whoever has drawn up the course specs should
demonstrate that the instruction meets state standards for visual arts.
Otherwise it should go into whatever department handles home ec/shop
etc. in
your district.  Or teach it as an interdisciplinary class with home
economics and science history also integrated.
Linda
---- Original message ----
>Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 12:22:10 -0700
>From: "Sidnie Miller" <SMILLER@elko.k12.nv.us>
>Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] non VAPA class
>To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>
&gt;one thought--sometimes when you teach a course that is called a
career
&gt;oriented course there is
&gt;lots of moneys available for such courses.  Do you need a little
boost
&gt;in the finances??
&gt;
&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt; ldiem@prodigy.net 9/25/2006 8:56 pm &gt;&gt;&gt;
&gt;My school curriculum and instruction just gave approval to a new
course
&gt;
&gt;called "Floral Design and Production" for FINE ARTS credit.  I am
&gt;trying to
&gt;fight this as it should be a "Practical Arts" course not a Fine Arts
&gt;course.
&gt;If anyone has any experience or suggestions to help our dept fight
it,
&gt;
&gt;please let me know!
&gt;
&gt;LDiem
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;---
&gt;To unsubscribe go to
&gt;http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
&gt;
&gt;---
&gt;To unsubscribe go to
&gt;http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: non VAPA class
From: Ray Leal <rayleal@earthlink.net>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 17:53:48 -0700
X-Message-Number: 29
California high schools use the University of California entrance
requirements as guides. Visual and Performing Arts credits are
required for entrance and only certain classes are approved for the
requirement, so the high schools offer those classes. Guidelines are
at http://www.ucop.edu/a-gGuide/ag/a-g/vpa.html They are pretty
stringent about what is and isn't accepted.  Essentially it is
whether the course is aligned with the State Standards
Heather
On Sep 26, 2006, at 3:31 PM, Jeff Pridie wrote:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: RE: non VAPA class
From: <lpapanicolaou@pausd.org>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 18:54:01 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 30
I think we must have it here in CA.  The district had to go through and
check that everyone in 'core subjects' was certificated to teach that
subject.  I had to be checked off--my friend the home ec teacher did
not.
Linda
---- Original message ----
>Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 14:41:59 -0700
>From: "Duffey, Patrick G." <DuffeyP@Peninsula.wednet.edu>
>Subject: RE: [teacherartexchange] non VAPA class
>To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>
&gt;Does anyone know if other states have the same requirement? I am
running
&gt;into the same issue here in the state of Washington
&gt;
&gt;-----Original Message-----
&gt;From: M. Austin [mailto:whest177@wheatstate.com]
&gt;Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 1:40 PM
&gt;To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
&gt;Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] non VAPA class
&gt;
&gt;I am the NCA chair for my district. One thing that must be taken
into
&gt;account is that in order for a Fine Arts Course to be counted for
credit
&gt;
&gt;towards graduation (state requirement) is that it must be taught by
a
&gt;certified fine arts instructor. This keeps schools from having the
&gt;industrial arts teacher have students build a dresser and calling it
an
&gt;arts
&gt;class. That might be your argument - if it is a fine arts course
there
&gt;must
&gt;be creativity/art history/aesthetics involved, and is it being
taught by
&gt;a
&gt;cerified fine arts instructor.
&gt;~Michal
&gt;K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
&gt;http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
&gt;
&gt;&gt; My school curriculum and instruction just gave approval to a
new
&gt;course
&gt;&gt; called "Floral Design and Production" for FINE ARTS credit.  I
am
&gt;trying
&gt;&gt; to fight this as it should be a "Practical Arts" course not a
Fine
&gt;Arts
&gt;&gt; course. If anyone has any experience or suggestions to help our
dept
&gt;fight
&gt;&gt; it, please let me know!
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;---
&gt;To unsubscribe go to
&gt;http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
&gt;
&gt;---
&gt;To unsubscribe go to
&gt;http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: tie-dye
From: "Jean Womack" <jeaneger@jeaneger.com>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 23:16:09 -0700
X-Message-Number: 31
Hello teachers,
I was planning to put up a lesson plan for a tie-dye party on my web
site,
since I just had one for my church group.  However, I wanted to know,
how do
you deal with the problem of the toxicity of the soda ash solution that
you
have to soak the T-shirts in?  I stood at the soda ash tub and people
handed
me their tied-up T-shirts and then I pushed them into the solution and
later
took them out and wrung them out and handed them back to the person to
dye.
However it meant that I could not really do much of anything else during
the
event, because I was so busy guarding the soda ash.  How do you solve
this,
or do you use something else besides Procion dyes?  Thanks for your
advice
on this.
Jean Womack
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