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Re: [teacherartexchange] Input wanted on "blue clouds", are they common in other parts of the country?

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lpapanicolaou_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Sat Sep 23 2006 - 14:10:46 PDT


It probably has something to do with seeing the sky as nothingness. Do you know the book "Sky in a Bottle?"

http://mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/item/default.asp?ttype=2&tid=10612

Linda

---- Original message ----
>Date: Sat, 23 Sep 2006 07:50:22 EDT
>From: Carokarn@aol.com
>Subject: [teacherartexchange] Input wanted on "blue clouds", are they common in other parts of the country?
>To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group" <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
>
> I hope some of the list members can help me with this. When I first
>began teaching (k-8) here twenty years ago I noticed that almost all of my
>students would color their clouds blue and leave the sky white. It is a low-income
>area so my first thought was that first grade teachers encouraged children to
>color that way to preserve the blue crayons, but years passed, crayons were
>plentiful and still the blue clouds persisted. Often I would ask: "Why are the
>clouds blue?" the response: "Because that's what color clouds are." I would
>say "look outside, what color are the clouds?", they answer "White." So I ask
>why they color them blue and the usual response is "I donno, they're just
>supposed to be blue."
> I have worked in schools in various parts of the country, but don't
>recall noticing a lot of blue clouds. I grew up about sixty miles from here and
>have no memory of them as a student or teacher there. I can remember my
>kindergarten teacher showing me how to draw fluffy white clouds in a blue sky. Is
>this just a local thing? If so, do any of you see it in your areas? How would
>you handle it?
> I usually insist that my students color the entire page so the clouds
>either disappear when they color the sky blue or they color the sky a different
>color (which is fine and sometimes striking) but after these many years I am
>still wondering...and last week my granddaughter came home from kindergarten
>with a picture of our house and (you guessed it) blue clouds. I asked her why
>the clouds were blue, the response "because that's what color you are supposed
>to color clouds!"
>
> Any thoughts or comments are welcome. This is like the sun in the
>corner, is that typical all over the world or just in this country?
>
>Carol Karn
>Clio, SC
>
>
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