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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 02, 2006

---------

From: Claire d'Anthes (cdanthes_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Sep 03 2006 - 20:32:35 PDT


Dear colleagues,
I haven't popped on in a while. Last time you all gave me some ideas
for my printmaking class, some of which I'll be using this year. I did
send in a thank you but I didn't see it in the days that followed and
then I got BUSY. So, just in case something went wrong, thanks for the
many great tips I get from this site. I'm hoping that some of you who
teach in California, Florida, Texas, and the Southwest may have some
experience with the situation I'm currently in. I teach Printmaking,
Painting, and Drawing at a southern CA high school and all my classes
contain English language learners. I am trained to teach these
students and so far having them in my class has mostly been a pleasure.
  Like all of you, I teach with visuals, demonstrations, and once the
large group gets rolling, I have time to work with students one on one
and in small groups to make sure that they have understood. I have
sometimes had to adapt literacy activities but never have had to omit
them. This year's group of students from Mexico and China seems great,
but I was assigned 19 ELLs in my 6th period drawing class, more than
half the class! I think they must be mainstreaming them earlier than
before because most of this year's group speaks NO English at all and,
unlike past groups, I'm not sure all of them really are interested in
art. I speak a little Spanish and no Chinese. I feel confident about
being able to get the directions across, but I'm a little afraid, based
on experience, that I'll lose the English-speaking half of my audience
and the ELL students with a lot of art experience as I break things
down more slowly for the others. I'm also wondering how on earth to
use a video in the class or do critique assignments. (My district is
really big on meeting the state standards and in encouraging literacy
across the curriculum). Another concern is getting the kids to
interact more. Last year I managed to integrate my small group of ELL
students pretty well thanks to a few great student leaders on both
sides. This year I think I have the right personalities to open things
up again, but there is always too much safety in numbers. If anyone
else has taught a class like this, I would love some tips or a book
recommendation addressing any of these concerns. I'd really like to
get the students helping each other and make the communication process
fun for all. Thank you.

Claire

On Sep 3, 2006, at 12:01 AM, TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
wrote:

> TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Saturday, September 02, 2006.
>
> 1. Asymmetrical Balance
> 2. Art from Trash - Kinetic Sculpture - Jean Tinguely
> 3. Tip for using dried up watercolor markers
> 4. Re: TAB Choice in difficult circumstances
> 5. Re: TAB Choice Excitement! Off to a GREAT Start
> 6. Kim's Korner for Teachers - First Day ideas
> 7. K-12 Art Teacher Writers Wanted (for NAEA)
> 8. Any Fashion Teachers on the list?
> 9. Re: TAB Choice Excitement! Off to a GREAT Start
> 10. Re: TAB Choice in difficult circumstances
> 11. Imaginative artists
> 12. Re: Imaginative artists
> 13. RE: Imaginative artists
> 14. Re: TAB Choice Excitement! Off to a GREAT Start
> 15. Re: Go ahead, try choice in difficult circumstances(long)
> 16. Re: Go ahead, try choice in difficult circumstances(long)
> 17. TAB week two
> 18. Re: Go ahead, try choice in difficult circumstances(long)
> 19. Re: Imaginative artists
> 20. Re: Imaginative artists
> 21. change in e-mail address
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Asymmetrical Balance
> From: "Chantal Pinnow" <cpinnow@yisseoul.org>
> Date: Sun, 3 Sep 2006 05:30:23 -0700
> X-Message-Number: 1
>
> Does anyone have a good project that helps the kids understand
> asymmetrical
> balance?
> Chantal - Seoul, South Korea
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Art from Trash - Kinetic Sculpture - Jean Tinguely
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 06:37:35 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 2
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> Here is an artist I had forgotten about - Jean Tinguely:
> http://www.artcyclopedia.com/artists/tinguely_jean.html
> Sculptures from recycled metal, etc.
>
> He was brought back to mind by a NY Times article about a joint
> exhibit with work of Niki de Saint Phalle. They collaborated on many
> pieces.
>
> For Tinguely and Saint Phalle, a Show is a Posthumous Reunion
> By ALAN RIDING
> http://www.nytimes.com/pages/arts/design/index.html
>
> "Their relationship was forged initially by love, but what sustained
> it for more than 30 years was their close collaboration in art =97 and
> the belief that each was the other's most important friend."
>
> "Now, with 'Niki and Jean: Art and Love' the Tinguely Museum here is
> for the first time presenting their work side by side, along with
> photographs, drawings and models of some of the monumental projects
> they did together, most famously the Stravinsky Fountain beside the
> Georges Pompidou Center in Paris. The show runs through Jan. 21."
>
> Subscription is free for on line N Y Times. This is a great way to
> bring current events into your classroom. You get three articles every
> day for the Arts - with the link to more articles. I skim through Art
> & Design everyday looking for tidbits to share.
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Tip for using dried up watercolor markers
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 07:35:52 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 3
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> I read this tip on Funding Factory web site.
> http://lessonplans.fundingfactory.com/
>
> Set out dishes (or small jars of water). Dip the dried up watercolor
> markers in the water and draw/paint with it. Don't leave the marker in
> water too long.
>
> If anyone has some dried up markers - give this a try and reply to me
> how successful the technique is. I will add it to the lesson ideas
> page for markers.
> I don't have any dried up markers to experiment with.
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: TAB Choice in difficult circumstances
> From: twoducks@aol.com
> Date: Sat, 02 Sep 2006 08:49:40 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 4
>
>
>
> <<From: iforget000
> I teach k-8 art in a jammed classroom with a giant paper cutter
> and=20
> no sink.=C2=A0
> I have water in 2 igloo containers and the dirty water goes into
> a=C2=A0
> five gallon bucket.=C2=A0
> I can't figure out how I would do most of this.>>
>
>
> First of all let me say, you are an art education hero. Teaching
> that=20
> range of ages in such a substandard situation and still wanting to=20
> improve your practice is beyond admirable!
>
> Saying that, also, I feel that student centered choice teaching=20
> actually addresses a lot of the issues that plague us as art
> educators:=20
> terrible schedules, insufficient time, not much space, random
> supplies=20
> available and an incredibly diverse student population. Many of
> these=20
> issues confronted me as a green teacher; that was in the late=20
> sixties--everybody complained about conditions and as we see, the=20
> problems remain in our field. So! If these conditions just may be a=20
> given, how can we cope? And that is what got me developing what are=20
> now called TAB (Teaching FOR Artistic Behavior) strategies.
>
> In a bad room without running water and tooooo many kids and
> multiple=20
> age groups I can envision this:
> 1. More dry choices than wet: eventually lots of fiber/weaving which
> is=20
> clean, quiet and can go with the kids if they are not finished.
> 2. A variety of drawing media, entry level (colored pencils,
> pencils,=20
> templates, references, crayons, markers, erasers, still life objects=20
> (shells, plants, toys--trucks, horse and dino models, etc.) which=20
> everybody k-8 could access at will.
> More advanced media (charcoal, ink, oil pastels) put away where
> older=20
> students know how to find, use and put away.
> 3. A collage area or box with clear plastic bins and materials=20
> sorted--and most of this stuff would be found/free
> 4. A mini sculpture area: wire, cardboard, tape, glue, scissors,=20
> staplers, glue gun for older kids. Most of these materials would be=20
> found/free
> 5. you already have a computer center
> 6. Rubber stamping could take care of printing for awhile...
> 7. Your paint center: use what ever paints you already use, or just=20
> watercolors and "biggie block" temperas. Teach students (yes, grade=20
> one's too) to set up their own paints and clean them up. Limit to
> four=20
> or six kids per week.
> 9. Altered books, for those who like them (older kids rather than=20
> younger) and these would be filled using all of the above centers,
> so=20
> no additional center needed. Students could keep in their classroom=20
> and bring every week if storage were a problem
>
> Keep in mind every center has been opened one at a time with
> thorough=20
> instruction in a. what is found there b. how to use it (generally,
> not=20
> specifically) c. how to put it away. And students are held super=20
> accountable for cleanup, quiet work and whatever end products their
> age=20
> and your school needs find appropriate.
>
> The basic entry level materials are always there. Students know
> ahead=20
> of time what is there and are planning their work before they arrive.
> =20
> Cleanup should be no more than five minutes once the kids are in to
> it.=20
> Class beginnings should be similiarly brief, so time is used very=20
> efficiently.
>
> I have been teaching since 1969 and I have been using some form of=20
> choice since 1974...and after all this time I still love to go to
> work=20
> every day. My students continue to astonish and thrill me.
>
> Please visit our listserv =20
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/ to find an ongoing=20
> discussion of just this stuff...a searchable collection of nearly
> 4,000=20
> messages on these topics from teachers all over the country.
>
> Best Wishes,
> Kathy Douglas
> in massachusetts
>
> _______________________________________________________________________
> _
> Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and=20
> security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from=20
> across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: TAB Choice Excitement! Off to a GREAT Start
> From: twoducks@aol.com
> Date: Sat, 02 Sep 2006 09:01:12 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 5
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: jayna_99
>
> Although I don't do TAB Choice right now, I'm soooo
> intrigued by it and I would love to be able to start
> second semester. I did some research starting with
> Incredible Art department, and I found a middle school
> teacher with whom I hope to start an ongoing
> conversation, however, most references were to
> elementary teachers. Are there any others on the list
> (or off, Judy?) who would be interested in being my
> "buddy" and answering some specific questions and
> offer suggestions? Can anyone suggest really good
> reading material that might help fill in the blanks?>>
>
> Hi Jayna,
>
> Here is just one more "plug" for the Teaching for Artistic Behavior
> listserve.
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/
>
> nearly 4,000 searchable posts on this topic exclusively.
> 260+ teachers across the country...some veterans, some newer, some in
> transition, some just curious, some still in college
> files with choice lesson plans, handouts
> links to other student-centered art sites
> photos from choice classrooms
> And a number of the members have just such an "off list" buddy
> situation as you mention...and as more people join us there are groups
> getting together in each others' classrooms.
>
> Like this list, we are peopled with enthusiastic and helpful people who
> are learning from each other--a vital virtual community of educators.
> The textbook for this teaching concept is written and it in the process
> of finding a publisher. Stay tuned!
>
> kathy douglas
> in massachusetts
>
> _______________________________________________________________________
> _
> Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
> security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from
> across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Kim's Korner for Teachers - First Day ideas
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 11:11:32 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 6
>
> Greetings ArtsEducators,
>
> Anna in SD posted this link from Kim's Korner for Teachers to Art
> Education list.
> http://www.kimskorner4teachertalk.com/classmanagement/firstday.html
>
> This site is jam packed with tips that can be adapted to the art room.
> I know I posted the bulletin board link before.
>
> Here is the home page:
> http://www.kimskorner4teachertalk.com/
> Check the Site Map to see what all is there:
> http://www.kimskorner4teachertalk.com/site_map.htm
> Some of the writing resources may appeal to you - or scroll past those
> to the other sections.
>
> Regards,
>
> Judy Decker
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: K-12 Art Teacher Writers Wanted (for NAEA)
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 12:15:16 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 7
>
> Dear Art Educators,
>
> I received this notice from NAEA.....
>
> NAEA NEWS ALERT
> NATIONAL ART EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
> Office of the Executive Director
> Phone 703-860-8000 Fax 703-860-2960
> URL=97http://www.naea-reston.org
>
> K-12 ART TEACHER WRITERS WANTED
> THE NAEA ADVISORY
>
> The NAEA Advisory is intended to provide practical information on
> current
> issues, interests, and concerns. Topics for Advisorys should be aimed
> at
> translating research and theory into practice for the K-12 NAEA member.
>
> K-12 teachers are encouraged to submit papers. Topics might include
> strategies for instruction and student learning; strategies for
> classroom organization
> and behavior management; assessment procedures related to art learning;
> incorporation of the National Visual Arts Standards into existing
> state and local
> curricula; alternative methods for teaching using technology; art
> instructi=
> on
> and higher-order thinking; issues related to teacher preparation; the
> incorporation of multiple-intelligences theories; conducting research
> in th=
> e art
> classroom; instructional practices in other cultures; and, art
> instruction =
> in
> community contexts.
>
> Papers should be no longer than 3-4 pages double-spaced including
> reference=
> s
> (600-700 words).
>
> Send submissions to: Dr. Christine J. Davis, Editor, NAEA Advisory,
> 1071
> River Road, Greer, SC, 29651-8197. Email: artsresearch@yahoo.com.
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> --
>
> This would be a good "feather in your cap" to get something published
> by NA=
> EA.
>
> Judy
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Any Fashion Teachers on the list?
> From: "Judy Decker" <judy.decker@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 13:24:08 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 8
>
> Greetings Art Educators,
>
> Cathy would like to connect with other fashion design teachers. She
> has looked for a list serve, but can' t find one. Please contact Cathy
> directly (cath910 at aol.com).
> Cathy has a lesson plan on IAD:
> http://www.princetonol.com/groups/iad/lessons/high/Cathy-fashion.htm
>
> Maybe your mini group can brainstorm on some additional lessons for
> sharing?
>
> Judy Decker
>
> Here is Cathy's Art Education list post:
>
> From: Cathy
> Subject: Reaching out for any other fashion design or illustration
> teachers
>
> I would love to share ideas and learn more from others that are
> working with fashion. I have a lesson on IAD but would like to open
> new horizons. Thanks Cathy
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: TAB Choice Excitement! Off to a GREAT Start
> From: "Eileen Ellis" <iforget000@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 16:52:47 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 9
>
> To Michal:
>
> You have two rooms! You are very lucky.
> I have one room.
>
> I see 427 kids in one week over three days
> I don't get paid for Wednesdays and Fridays so I try
> staying away. Just ask my grown kids how well
> I did with that over the years>:-)
>
> I have the equivalent of 35 minutes or less with
> each grade 18 homerooms once a week and
> each grade is doing something different.
>
> TAB would work if I had more time but I don't so we are doing
> sketchbooks
> this year for grades 5-8. Three minute sketches as a warm up.
>
> This also gives me a little time between classes to get my head ready.
> Thursdays I have 2 kindergarten classes back to back 28 kids each,
> Then 20 minutes free and then two 2nd grades, lunch , one 7th grade
> and then two 6th grades. My kids all help with the clean up or I would
> never get home.
>
> I like the cup ideas but would not like to clean up/out 50 to 60 cups
> before I go home.
>
> EE
>
> On 9/1/06, M. Austin <whest177@wheatstate.com> wrote:
>> Water cups with lids OR yogurt cups. In my classroom without a sink I
>> have
>> cups with lids - at the end of class the students put the lids on the
>> cups
>> and put the cups at the end of the tables. I go to each table and put
>> the
>> water cups in a large plastic tub. In my other room I put yogurt cups
>> filled
>> 1/2 way with water. At the end of class I put the cups into a bucket
>> - dirty
>> water and all. I take care of all clean up with younger students, and
>> as
>> they get older I start giving them the responsibility of cleaning up.
>> I do
>> not allow my primary students out of their chairs unless it is
>> completely
>> controled by me, and even then it is rarely. They can help quite abit
>> just
>> by putting supplies in order - all portfolios in one pile, sharpies in
>> another. While I am grabbing supplies to put away I am engaging them
>> by
>> reviewing concepts with them. I only have them for 20 minutes and
>> have found
>> I can distribute and collect all supplies in 5 min., leaving 15 min.
>> for
>> work time. I have tried having students help clean up and I find I
>> lose too
>> much work time. By the time the students are in 6th grade they are in
>> total
>> control of clean up.
>> ~Michal
>> K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
>> http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
>>
>>
>>> I teach k-8 art in a jammed classroom with a giant paper cutter and
>>> no
>>> sink.
>>> I have water in 2 igloo containers and the dirty water goes into a
>>> five gallon bucket.
>>> I can't figure out how I would do most of this.
>>> The creative thinking is attainable but having that many K-3 doing
>>> their
>>> own thing is terrifiying with only one art period of 40 min per week.
>>> I do have 8 tables but sometimes I have 31 kids.
>>> I can't imagine the clean up at the end of the day.
>>> Kids only do so much and time is a huge factor.
>>> Older kids would be easier but the grades will drop at first.
>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: TAB Choice in difficult circumstances
> From: "Eileen Ellis" <iforget000@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 16:59:19 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 10
>
> You have given me food for thought.
> How do I create assesments for something like this?
>
> As it is many projects are finished around grading time
> I do grades (2 of each ) for 2nd -8th grade.
>
> It is a nightmare. I hate it . I always have!
> I bring most pieces home so I can do gradingin peace and quiet.
> TAB would a bigger nightmare! (at least it seems this way)
> Tab choice art ed...I will look here.
>
> EE
>
> On 9/2/06, twoducks@aol.com <twoducks@aol.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>> <<From: iforget000
>> I teach k-8 art in a jammed classroom with a giant paper cutter
>> and
>> no sink.
>> I have water in 2 igloo containers and the dirty water goes into a
>> five gallon bucket.
>> I can't figure out how I would do most of this.>>
>>
>>
>> First of all let me say, you are an art education hero. Teaching that
>> range of ages in such a substandard situation and still wanting to
>> improve your practice is beyond admirable!
>>
>> Saying that, also, I feel that student centered choice teaching
>> actually addresses a lot of the issues that plague us as art
>> educators:
>> terrible schedules, insufficient time, not much space, random supplies
>> available and an incredibly diverse student population. Many of these
>> issues confronted me as a green teacher; that was in the late
>> sixties--everybody complained about conditions and as we see, the
>> problems remain in our field. So! If these conditions just may be a
>> given, how can we cope? And that is what got me developing what are
>> now called TAB (Teaching FOR Artistic Behavior) strategies.
>>
>> In a bad room without running water and tooooo many kids and multiple
>> age groups I can envision this:
>> 1. More dry choices than wet: eventually lots of fiber/weaving which
>> is
>> clean, quiet and can go with the kids if they are not finished.
>> 2. A variety of drawing media, entry level (colored pencils, pencils,
>> templates, references, crayons, markers, erasers, still life objects
>> (shells, plants, toys--trucks, horse and dino models, etc.) which
>> everybody k-8 could access at will.
>> More advanced media (charcoal, ink, oil pastels) put away where older
>> students know how to find, use and put away.
>> 3. A collage area or box with clear plastic bins and materials
>> sorted--and most of this stuff would be found/free
>> 4. A mini sculpture area: wire, cardboard, tape, glue, scissors,
>> staplers, glue gun for older kids. Most of these materials would be
>> found/free
>> 5. you already have a computer center
>> 6. Rubber stamping could take care of printing for awhile...
>> 7. Your paint center: use what ever paints you already use, or just
>> watercolors and "biggie block" temperas. Teach students (yes, grade
>> one's too) to set up their own paints and clean them up. Limit to four
>> or six kids per week.
>> 9. Altered books, for those who like them (older kids rather than
>> younger) and these would be filled using all of the above centers, so
>> no additional center needed. Students could keep in their classroom
>> and bring every week if storage were a problem
>>
>> Keep in mind every center has been opened one at a time with thorough
>> instruction in a. what is found there b. how to use it (generally, not
>> specifically) c. how to put it away. And students are held super
>> accountable for cleanup, quiet work and whatever end products their
>> age
>> and your school needs find appropriate.
>>
>> The basic entry level materials are always there. Students know ahead
>> of time what is there and are planning their work before they arrive.
>> Cleanup should be no more than five minutes once the kids are in to
>> it.
>> Class beginnings should be similiarly brief, so time is used very
>> efficiently.
>>
>> I have been teaching since 1969 and I have been using some form of
>> choice since 1974...and after all this time I still love to go to work
>> every day. My students continue to astonish and thrill me.
>>
>> Please visit our listserv
>> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TAB-ChoiceArtEd/ to find an ongoing
>> discussion of just this stuff...a searchable collection of nearly
>> 4,000
>> messages on these topics from teachers all over the country.
>>
>> Best Wishes,
>> Kathy Douglas
>> in massachusetts
>>
>> ______________________________________________________________________
>> __
>> Check out the new AOL. Most comprehensive set of free safety and
>> security tools, free access to millions of high-quality videos from
>> across the web, free AOL Mail and more.
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Imaginative artists
> From: Elizabeth Heisey <elizhiz@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 14:49:52 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 11
>
> Which artists do you think are most imaginative?
> Thanks in advance.
> Beth
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Imaginative artists
> From: Patricia Knott <pknott@enter.net>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 18:09:27 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 12
>
> Boy, that's a wonderfully loaded question.
> Imagination is tied to context and eras. What do you mean by
> imaginative?
>
> Marcel Duchamp
>
> Patty
>
>
> On Sep 2, 2006, at 5:49 PM, Elizabeth Heisey wrote:
>
>> Which artists do you think are most imaginative?
>> Thanks in advance.
>> Beth
>>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: RE: Imaginative artists
> From: "KPRS2" <kprs2@earthlink.net>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 18:46:05 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 13
>
> Calder, Red Grooms, DaVinci, Dali, Picasso, Giacometti, Blake, Miro,
> Chagall
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: TAB Choice Excitement! Off to a GREAT Start
> From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 17:55:17 -0500
> X-Message-Number: 14
>
> *LOL* I have FOUR rooms to take care of! I am in 3 buildings, 2 towns
> daily.
> I have to be SUPER organized to make sure that I have all supplies
> where
> they are needed, and that I make the best use of every minute with the
> kids.
> I rotate projects so only one class paints at a time, and I have
> students
> share water cups, so there are only 6-12 cups, depending on the class.
> I
> would never paint if I had to wash out that many cups! *L*
> ~Michal
>
>
>> To Michal:
>>
>> You have two rooms! You are very lucky.
>> I have one room.
>>
>> I like the cup ideas but would not like to clean up/out 50 to 60 cups
>> before I go home.
>>
>> EE
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Go ahead, try choice in difficult circumstances(long)
> From: Mikel Lee <mikellee31@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 16:57:45 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 15
>
>> As it is many projects are finished around grading
>> time
>> I do grades (2 of each ) for 2nd -8th grade.
>>
>> It is a nightmare. I hate it . I always have!
>> I bring most pieces home so I can do gradingin peace
>> and quiet.
>> TAB would a bigger nightmare! (at least it seems
>> this way)
>> Tab choice art ed...I will look here.
>>
>> EE
>
> I have to grade all of my students too and I have
> about 480 1-5 graders. Our grading scale is
> E-excellent, S- satisfactory, H- Having difficulty,
> and N- needs improvement in grades 3-5 with a plus,
> check or minus in three subcategories. Then in 1st and
> 2nd we have S- satisfactory, P- progressing, U-
> unsatisfactory. I have taken a grade every day for how
> they are working. Last year I couldn't keep up with
> anything when I was doing projects. I write a letter
> for what center they are in and a plus if they have
> done outstanding so I can remember to praise them
> accordingly.
>
> With choice all of the kids are all working so
> independently on what they choose to work on.
> Therefore, they are not struggling and frustrated
> trying to mimic my project and meet my examples
> expectations. This has given me so much time to walk
> around and talk to the kids during class. I actually
> get to talk to all of them... see what they are
> working on...hear their plans for next week and it is
> very nice. It makes them so proud to get to tell me
> what they havce thought of all on their own.
>
> You will be amazed at what happens if you switch to
> choice. I know how you feel. I was so scared to try it
> that I read all 3000 something posts just to see how
> other people did it. When I read I learned that a lot
> of people were scared and that at first some of the
> older kids have trouble thinking on their own and that
> everyone's story pretty much is progressing happily.
> It is NOTHING like trying to drag the kids through
> projects. It is so much fun. I kept reading from
> people to follow the path your students will lead you
> on and I didn't quite get it... but after three weeks
> I can see what they mean... The kids start telling you
> what they want. You can start seeing that certain kids
> need more 3-d activities and others could really go
> all out if you just got them a huge piece of paper.
> You will start getting excited by how excited you know
> your kids are going to be. I stay late every day now
> because I am excited about making the room cool for
> the kids...not because I have to cut 200 sheets of
> same sized paper so everyone can do my project!!!
>
> Then I have a group of boys who started making paper
> airplanes because they couldn't think of anything else
> to do, so I had to stop them and tell them not to
> waste my paper. Then we started talking about what if
> they designed a huge flying airplane? What could they
> make it out of? how would it look? They started with
> bulletin board paper borrowed from the teachers work
> room...then we reinforced it with glue that stiffened
> when it dried because cardboard was too heavy... then
> they had to solve all of the issues that came up...and
> then it flew!! It was a glorious huge airplane made by
> three 5th grade boys who never have shown any interest
> in art and the whole class was cheering for them when
> we went into the hall to fly it down the hall!!!
> Now I know that a giant paper airplane may be scoffed
> at by some art teachers, but when they were making it
> I was just as excited as I was when I was in college
> collaborating with my fellow art students. It was
> exciting!
>
> I know it is scary, but you will be amazed at how your
> kids will light up and how creative they really are. I
> am sorry that I rambled on. - Mikel in OK
>
>
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Go ahead, try choice in difficult circumstances(long)
> From: "Eileen Ellis" <iforget000@gmail.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 20:40:41 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 16
>
> I am all for creativity but I was just a member of the group who
> rewrote the
> graded courses of study for art for the Diocese of Cleveland. Now I
> have to look
> over all that work and see how to make it work with Choice.
> To get started this year I plan to let more kids use the art product
> of choice
> which will help with class discussions. I just need to make sure my
> kids
> don't repeatedly choose the same art products and tools.
>
> I am going to have to research like you did.
> Are there topics and then the kids figure out how to cover the topic,
> theme or idea?
> I would love to see kids in action with their teachers.
> Maybe someone in Cleveland or the burbs is using TAB.
>
> For grades we use O S+ S S- N U for Kindergarten through 4th grade
> for 5th-8th we use A+ /A/ A-/ B+/ B/ B-/ etc.
>
> EE
>
> Eileen
>
> On 9/2/06, Mikel Lee <mikellee31@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>> As it is many projects are finished around grading
>>> time
>>> I do grades (2 of each ) for 2nd -8th grade.
>>>
>>> It is a nightmare. I hate it . I always have!
>>> I bring most pieces home so I can do gradingin peace
>>> and quiet.
>>> TAB would a bigger nightmare! (at least it seems
>>> this way)
>>> Tab choice art ed...I will look here.
>>>
>>> EE
>>
>> I have to grade all of my students too and I have
>> about 480 1-5 graders. Our grading scale is
>> E-excellent, S- satisfactory, H- Having difficulty,
>> and N- needs improvement in grades 3-5 with a plus,
>> check or minus in three subcategories. Then in 1st and
>> 2nd we have S- satisfactory, P- progressing, U-
>> unsatisfactory. I have taken a grade every day for how
>> they are working. Last year I couldn't keep up with
>> anything when I was doing projects. I write a letter
>> for what center they are in and a plus if they have
>> done outstanding so I can remember to praise them
>> accordingly.
>>
>> With choice all of the kids are all working so
>> independently on what they choose to work on.
>> Therefore, they are not struggling and frustrated
>> trying to mimic my project and meet my examples
>> expectations. This has given me so much time to walk
>> around and talk to the kids during class. I actually
>> get to talk to all of them... see what they are
>> working on...hear their plans for next week and it is
>> very nice. It makes them so proud to get to tell me
>> what they havce thought of all on their own.
>>
>> You will be amazed at what happens if you switch to
>> choice. I know how you feel. I was so scared to try it
>> that I read all 3000 something posts just to see how
>> other people did it. When I read I learned that a lot
>> of people were scared and that at first some of the
>> older kids have trouble thinking on their own and that
>> everyone's story pretty much is progressing happily.
>> It is NOTHING like trying to drag the kids through
>> projects. It is so much fun. I kept reading from
>> people to follow the path your students will lead you
>> on and I didn't quite get it... but after three weeks
>> I can see what they mean... The kids start telling you
>> what they want. You can start seeing that certain kids
>> need more 3-d activities and others could really go
>> all out if you just got them a huge piece of paper.
>> You will start getting excited by how excited you know
>> your kids are going to be. I stay late every day now
>> because I am excited about making the room cool for
>> the kids...not because I have to cut 200 sheets of
>> same sized paper so everyone can do my project!!!
>>
>> Then I have a group of boys who started making paper
>> airplanes because they couldn't think of anything else
>> to do, so I had to stop them and tell them not to
>> waste my paper. Then we started talking about what if
>> they designed a huge flying airplane? What could they
>> make it out of? how would it look? They started with
>> bulletin board paper borrowed from the teachers work
>> room...then we reinforced it with glue that stiffened
>> when it dried because cardboard was too heavy... then
>> they had to solve all of the issues that came up...and
>> then it flew!! It was a glorious huge airplane made by
>> three 5th grade boys who never have shown any interest
>> in art and the whole class was cheering for them when
>> we went into the hall to fly it down the hall!!!
>> Now I know that a giant paper airplane may be scoffed
>> at by some art teachers, but when they were making it
>> I was just as excited as I was when I was in college
>> collaborating with my fellow art students. It was
>> exciting!
>>
>> I know it is scary, but you will be amazed at how your
>> kids will light up and how creative they really are. I
>> am sorry that I rambled on. - Mikel in OK
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> __________________________________________________
>> Do You Yahoo!?
>> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
>> http://mail.yahoo.com
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: TAB week two
> From: Betty B <bettycarol_40@sbcglobal.net>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 18:02:16 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 17
>
> I'm getting more used to total choice, they are still
> doing their drawing warmup - I have to stand in the
> hall between each class, so don't want them into the
> centers without me being in there, so I'm keeping my
> "bellwork".
>
> No real behavior issues this week, we had 2 fights at
> school, involving 3 of my students from one hour, so
> at least I had smaller classes!
>
> I have "artist statement forms" available on the
> center table all the time, and they can fill one out
> and staple it to anything they do that they want to
> put in the class folder for a grade, that way I'm
> only grading work they are proud of. Otherwise, its
> just about daily participation. I do have three or
> four boys who have accomplished nothing that I can
> see, but at least they have stopped just sitting.
>
> They are still struggling with having anything to make
> art about. I had them all write down ten possible
> ideas that they could work from, and all 137 students
> came up with pretty much the same ten things, mostly
> stealing ideas from art I have up in the room, or
> "vase of flowers", "flag" etc., so I talked to each
> one about their list privately and how we could flesh
> it out or make it more personal. I don't mean for them
> to do all ten, hopefully they will loosen up a little
> in this sense.
>
> I had a sub the last 2 days of the week, as my mother
> passed away Wednesday afternoon, and she (the sub) did
> not like my setup or "lesson plans" and apparently
> Friday made them all sit through a lesson on negative
> space. Sadly, she was my student teacher last year and
> her lesson on negative space even confused me! So I'll
> have to deal with that when I get back Tuesday. My mom
> was an elementary teacher for her entire career, and
> that would have amused her greatly.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Go ahead, try choice in difficult circumstances(long)
> From: Mikel Lee <mikellee31@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 18:56:36 -0700 (PDT)
> X-Message-Number: 18
>
> In my room there are no topics or themes given by me.
> I only teach them a brief introduction on how to use a
> center and the materials within the center. Later I
> plan to add lessons on techniques or art history or
> whatever comes up after all of the centers are open.
> This is what I gleaned from other TAB choice teachers
> on the list. Everyone seems to do things a little
> different according to their own teaching style.
>
> What is supposed to be gained by the kids in "graded
> courses of study for art?" Are the grades supposed to
> be for the teacher's accountability or for the
> student's? Could you possibly have the kids fill out
> an assessment sheet or an artist statement after they
> finish each project and leave that with you for your
> grading? - Mikel
>
>
>> I am all for creativity but I was just a member of
>> the group who rewrote the
>> graded courses of study for art for the Diocese of
>> Cleveland. Now I have to look
>> over all that work and see how to make it work with
>> Choice.
>> To get started this year I plan to let more kids use
>> the art product of choice
>> which will help with class discussions. I just need
>> to make sure my kids
>> don't repeatedly choose the same art products and
>> tools.
>>
>> I am going to have to research like you did.
>> Are there topics and then the kids figure out how to
>> cover the topic,
>> theme or idea?
>> I would love to see kids in action with their
>> teachers.
>> Maybe someone in Cleveland or the burbs is using
>> TAB.
>>
>> For grades we use O S+ S S- N U for Kindergarten
>> through 4th grade
>> for 5th-8th we use A+ /A/ A-/ B+/ B/ B-/ etc.
>>
>> EE
>>
>> Eileen
>
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Imaginative artists
> From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
> Date: Sat, 2 Sep 2006 20:26:29 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 19
>
> Beth,
> I always started out my sixth graders each year by trying to =20
> demonstrate
> the four components of a creative person: Fluency, Flexibility, =20
> Elaboration
> and Originality. Off the top of my head the contemporary artist that
> =20
> comes to
> mind is Judy Chicago. She lives about 35 miles south of here in Belin,
> New Mexico. I'm going to try and convince the Docents at our museum to
> arrange a visit to her studio.
>
> Fluency: Means coming up with a large number of ideas.
>
> Flexibility: Means coming up with varied concepts.
>
> Elaboration: Means putting lots of information into your work.
>
> Originality: Means to be new and unique in your thinking.
>
> http://www.judychicago.com/judychicago.php?p=3Ddinnerparty1
>
> Woody
> Another living artists that comes to mind is the Spanish artist Jaume
> =20=
>
> Plensa.
>
> http://www.taospaint.com/Chicago/Plensa.html
>
> I'd be interested in what others think.
>
> On Sep 2, 2006, at 3:49 PM, Elizabeth Heisey wrote:
>
>> Which artists do you think are most imaginative?
>> Thanks in advance.
>> Beth
>
> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>
> =93The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.=94 from: =93Art & Fear=94
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
> My newest watercolors:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>
>
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Imaginative artists
> From: dianegregory@grandecom.net
> Date: Sat, 02 Sep 2006 21:16:10 -0600
> X-Message-Number: 20
>
> It might be fun to let students identify who they think are
> imaginative artists.
> Teachers could allow students to make their choices based upon a list
> of 20-25
> artists. These could be found on the web and students could choose
> and justify
> their choice. Students could even identify their own criteria for
> selection.
> The list Woody provided could be one way to identify imaginative, but
> there
> could be other ways to identify imaginative.
>
> What do you think?
>
>
>
> Quoting Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>:
>
>> Beth,
>> I always started out my sixth graders each year by trying to
>> demonstrate
>> the four components of a creative person: Fluency, Flexibility,
>> Elaboration
>> and Originality. Off the top of my head the contemporary artist that
>> comes to
>> mind is Judy Chicago. She lives about 35 miles south of here in Belin,
>> New Mexico. I'm going to try and convince the Docents at our museum to
>> arrange a visit to her studio.
>>
>> Fluency: Means coming up with a large number of ideas.
>>
>> Flexibility: Means coming up with varied concepts.
>>
>> Elaboration: Means putting lots of information into your work.
>>
>> Originality: Means to be new and unique in your thinking.
>>
>> http://www.judychicago.com/judychicago.php?p=dinnerparty1
>>
>> Woody
>> Another living artists that comes to mind is the Spanish artist Jaume
>> Plensa.
>>
>> http://www.taospaint.com/Chicago/Plensa.html
>>
>> I'd be interested in what others think.
>>
>> On Sep 2, 2006, at 3:49 PM, Elizabeth Heisey wrote:
>>
>>> Which artists do you think are most imaginative?
>>> Thanks in advance.
>>> Beth
>>
>> Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
>> mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>>
>> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
>> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
>> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
>> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
>> Albuquerque, NM 87199-1703
>>
>> ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
>> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
>> of your artwork that soars.? from: ?Art & Fear?
>>
>> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
>> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
>> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
>> http://www.taospaint.com/Beautiful/Grandkids.html
>> My newest watercolors:
>> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Recent.html
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ---
>> To unsubscribe go to
>> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> Associate Professor of Art Education
> Director, Graduate & Undergraduate Studies in
> Art Education
> Department of Visual Arts
> Texas Woman's University
> 940.898.2530
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: change in e-mail address
> From: kathymoser@blazenet.net
> Date: Sun, 3 Sep 2006 00:55:49 -0400
> X-Message-Number: 21
>
> Please change my e-mail address for discussion group mail and any other
> mailings from your organization to <liuartlady@yahoo.com> Thank you.
>
>
>
> ---
>
> END OF DIGEST
>
> ---
> cdanthes@verizon.net
> leave-teacherartexchange-73144W@lists.pub.getty.edu
>

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