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[teacherartexchange] Motivating 4th graders

---------

From: JacobusseJulie (JacobusseJulie_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Wed Sep 28 2005 - 14:42:52 PDT


Thanks for the input on motivating the 4th graders. I had a 4th grade class
today and I talked to them about how I was feeling with how the classes have
been going and it really seemed to help. They worked on their projects and
did a much better job overall. I will try some 3-D projects with them to
keep their hands busy. If any of you have any southern cultural lessons or
any suggestions on books I could read so I can understand the culture more
let me know. If you are just tuning in I recently moved from Michigan to
teach in Georgia.
Julie Jacobusse- Art K-5
Jackson Elementary School, Georgia

-----Original Message-----
From: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest
[mailto:teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, September 28, 2005 3:01 AM
To: teacherartexchange digest recipients
Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 27, 2005

TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, September 27, 2005.

1. Re: "thuggy little boys"
2. Re: Re:"thuggy little boys"
3. Re: Stacie: visual journals
4. egyptian cartouche
5. Re: egyptian cartouche
6. Re: egyptian cartouche
7. Re: egyptian cartouche
8. Re: "thuggy little boys"
9. Update
10. art content policies-Help!
11. Re: art content policies-Help!
12. Re: art content policies-Help!
13. classroom management-- Stacie
14. Re: motivating 4th graders
15. Re: classroom management-- Stacie
16. Re: art content policies-Help!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: "thuggy little boys"
From: lindwood@webtv.net
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 07:14:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Holly,
    You said that your "thuggy little boys" had become some of your
favorites. I can relate to that. My cockateil has become a way to get
to some of them. One "thuggy little boy" (haha) races to the room to
be first to see her each day. One of the other boys said, "Alexander is
just obsessed with your cockateil!!!" as if complaining. "That's ok," I
said. I saw a little smile come from Alexander's face as he realized
that it perfectly ok to be obsessed with my cockateil. He is like putty
in the palm of my hand now. He will do anything for me. He just so
happens to sit right by her cage anyway. He turns around to talk to her
occasionally during class but he is working harder and stays in his
seat! Love it. You have some great words of wisdom in your post.

Linda
 
Visit our Lower and Middle School Art Gallery Sites:
www.sjs.org
Click on Arts, Lower School or Middle School, Gallery

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Re:"thuggy little boys"
From: "HGillum" <hgillum@csd2.k12.ar.us>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 08:03:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks Linda, I needed that encouragement this morning. It's amazing what
you can get a child to do for you once you've bonded. So many of my
students come from questionable backgrounds with no semblance of normal
family life. I guess the "mama" in me just wants to adopt them...and I've
told my husband more than once, if I show up with a kid one evening, just go
along with me! Of course, there are too many to take home, but I do what I
can when I'm with them.

Hope you have a great day!

Holly
----- Original Message -----
From: <lindwood@webtv.net>
To: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group"
<teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, September 27, 2005 7:14 AM
Subject: Re:[teacherartexchange] "thuggy little boys"

> Holly,
> You said that your "thuggy little boys" had become some of your
> favorites. I can relate to that. My cockateil has become a way to get
> to some of them. One "thuggy little boy" (haha) races to the room to
> be first to see her each day. One of the other boys said, "Alexander is
> just obsessed with your cockateil!!!" as if complaining. "That's ok," I
> said. I saw a little smile come from Alexander's face as he realized
> that it perfectly ok to be obsessed with my cockateil. He is like putty
> in the palm of my hand now. He will do anything for me. He just so
> happens to sit right by her cage anyway. He turns around to talk to her
> occasionally during class but he is working harder and stays in his
> seat! Love it. You have some great words of wisdom in your post.
>
> Linda
>
> Visit our Lower and Middle School Art Gallery Sites:
> www.sjs.org
> Click on Arts, Lower School or Middle School, Gallery
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Stacie: visual journals
From: "go4art@juno.com" <go4art@juno.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 14:01:47 GMT
X-Message-Number: 3

Stacie, I have my students complete two assignments a week...one teacher
directed from observation in pencil, one student directed with any media
they choose. They have an assignment sheet glued onto the inside cover of
their sketchbook. The evaluation sheet is completed by them first and then
by me. I do this during class so that we can have conversations rather than
me keeping them, grading and giving them back without verbal feedback.

I've had some trouble with new pdf files, but the ones for 6th grade are on
my site. Feel free to use, adapt, etc if this is something that would work
for you and your students.
http://www.rrms.wlwv.k12.or.us/KielingL/Sketchbook/assignments.htm

creatively, Linda in Oregon

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: egyptian cartouche
From: Sheri Fried <sfried68@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 09:24:11 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 4

Hello
I am teaching a unit about Egyptian art to 4th and 5th
graders. We are finishing working with heiroglyphs,
and I would like them to create personal cartouches.
Any ideas?
Thanks
Sheri

                
__________________________________
Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
http://mail.yahoo.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: egyptian cartouche
From: "sharon@art-rageous.net" <sharon@art-rageous.net>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 15:48:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 5

My students enjoyed making cartouche pendants out of shrinky-dinks:
http://www.art-rageous.net/EgyptianArt.html

-- 
Sharon
www.art-rageous.net <http://www.art-rageous.net>
www.cafepress.com/artrageous <http://www.cafepress.com/artrageous>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: egyptian cartouche
From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 17:53:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6
I have many egyptian ideas!!!
My favourite for cartouches (and that grade level) is 'shrinky-dink' or 
'skrink-it' (two different brand names of the same thing).  These plastic 
sheets are availabe from most craft stores like Michaels.  Instructions are 
always included in the packages, which are not that expensive, and contain 
usually 6 or more sheets.  If you are doing necklaces - you can get 4 out of
one sheet.)  If you have a template of a cartouche, the students can trace 
it, put in their own name in hieroglyphics, cut it out, and then you can 
shrink them at home in your oven, at school in an oven, or in a toaster oven
in the classroom.  It shrinks to about a quarter of the original size. 
Pencil crayons and permanent markers only (crayolas will wash off).  Metalic
pencil crayons work great also.  They can make necklaces out of it, or key 
chains.  Actually we are doing this activity with teachers at a workshop on 
Egyptian lessons next month, and we are attaching pin backs to them.  If you
would like a PDF of the template that I am using for these - e-mail me off 
list, and I will be happy to e-mail that to you.  Actually, I think I have 
it so that I can get 8 out of one sheet of plastic.
Another idea would be to cast plaster.....mix up good old plaster of paris, 
and pour into styrofoam meat trays (if you ask your local grocery store, you
may be able to get some new ones - got to watch out for those germs),  Once 
the paster has set up, the kids can pop out the plaque, and then carve into 
the damp plaster a cartouche with their name in it.  Let the plaster dry 
further, and then paint.  If you cut apart big paper clips (so that you have
two loop sections instead of one clip) and you partially immerse the open 
end into the plaster before it dries, when you pop out the plaque, you have 
a hook already in it for hanging!
Got to go - the school is losing internet connection in a few minutes for an
upgrade.....
Sue Stevens 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: egyptian cartouche
From: "Sue Stevens" <suestevens@rogers.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 18:40:27 -0400
X-Message-Number: 7
Have a look at this website...
Click on "making a cartouche" - neat activity making a cartouche out of clay
or sculpty.
http://www.boiseartmuseum.org/education/egyptian.htm
Sue Stevens
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: "thuggy little boys"
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 19:11:40 EDT
X-Message-Number: 8
Some of my "thugs" are my favorites as well, I have to admit.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Update
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 19:12:52 EDT
X-Message-Number: 9
So things are going a little better this week.  I gave out my first
detention 
today.  Boo, but at least I did it, which should make it easier to give out 
future ones...okay maybe not.  Let's see, I've made a few changes, but not
too 
many...just haven't had the chance.
I started giving out bucks, and the kids got excited about it.  Actually, 
yesterday my 7th/8th grade class was working so well, I ran out of bucks!
They 
were working well on their own too...before they even knew bucks existed.  
Today, they weren't as good...don't know why.  I explained that I will give
them 
out on my terms, at random when I see someone doing something really good.  
Once they get four, they can get something out of my box.
For my elementary classes, I started going through the project step by step 
with them, which helped with the helpless hands.  We made a color wheel 
together, and they seemed to get it pretty well.  
As for cleanup, it's still a little tough.  Some days go better than others.
I'm still working that whole thing out, trying to figure out what will work 
best.  
No more "silent Art."  I've made it more simple.  If I have to tell them to 
quiet down three times, they will simply clean up and put their heads down.
I 
came very close yesterday with my sixth graders.  They almost lost art, but 
then they shaped up a little.
I made a rubric for each of the projects they are working on now.  I have a 
checklist and tell them that if they check off each item, they should get an
"A."  This way they know exactly what I'm looking for.  Then I ask them a
few 
questions about the project.  They are supposed to glue or tape the form to
the 
back of their project when they turn it in.  I think it's really going ot
help 
and plan on making rubrics for them for all projects in the future.
I slipped up and yelled today and got flustered.  I need to work on that.  I
need to figure out how to get the class under control when they are
completely 
out of control.  This tends to happen during cleanup.  Everyone starts to 
forget the rules and gets out of their seat.  They start putting things away
without my direction, and before I know it 30 kids are out of there seats,
banging 
into each other, hitting each other, screaming, laughing, falling
down...etc. 
 It can happen in a matter of seconds!  I need to find a more controlled
way, 
more calm way to gain their attention and get them to sit down.  Preferably 
something that doesn't involve paperwork.  Some days they can follow 
directions:  Sit quietly at their table with supply boxes ready to be
checked and 
portfolios in a nice stack.  Other days, they forget everything!  I have
created a 
checklist for the table captains so that they can start checking the bins 
themselves and putting them away without me, but I haven't really figured it
out 
yet.  I'm just worried that if I let them have that responsibility, they
won't 
care and will put the boxes away totally trashed.  Since I've been
"inspecting" 
them, the supplies have stayed in much better shape.
I just found out that this is my last full week with my middle schoolers!  I
thought I had two more weeks, but I only have three days with them next week
and then must turn in my grades and get ready for a new bunch.  I'm supposed
to 
do some bike and walking home safety project with them next week, but many 
are ready for a new project tomorrow.  Do you guys have any suggestions?  
Something fun and easy, something that will leave a good lasting impression?
Forget 
paint...too complicated, and if I get observed on Thursday, that would be a 
bad thing.  Should I let them choose their last project?  How about a comic 
strip of sorts?  It needs to be something cool I can figure out tonight and 
present tomorrow.  Right now they are finishing up perspective watercolor
drawings. 
 
Thanks again for all of your help.  I have printed out all of the replies
and 
have them in a folder so I can keep going back to them for guidance.  I know
I still need to make a lot of adjustments!
Stacie in Miami
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: art content policies-Help!
From: "Dawn Malosh" <dmalosh@stmichael.net>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 17:02:57 -0700
X-Message-Number: 10
Hi Fellow Art Teachers!
I really need your help!. My boss and I are having a meeting on Friday about
acceptable content in art. (I teach 4th-8th Art) We are trying to develop a
policy that we all agree on, which is tough. My boss asked me to find out
what other art departments' official policies are. Please help me!!! Do you
have official policies to regulate student content? Does anyone else have
actual written policies? I posted this last week but didn't have much of a
response.
With Great Appreciation,
	Dawn in Tucson
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: art content policies-Help!
From: "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 18:18:49 -0600
X-Message-Number: 11
Please clarify your question.  When you say art content are you talking
about
subject matter or are you talking about art concepts that are covered in
curriculum guides?  Is the concern objectionable subject matter?
--
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
Studies in Art Education
Texas Woman's University
Denton, TX  76204
dgregory@mail.twu.edu
940-898-2540
Quoting Dawn Malosh <dmalosh@stmichael.net>:
> Hi Fellow Art Teachers!
>
> I really need your help!. My boss and I are having a meeting on Friday
about
> acceptable content in art. (I teach 4th-8th Art) We are trying to develop
a
> policy that we all agree on, which is tough. My boss asked me to find out
> what other art departments' official policies are. Please help me!!! Do
you
> have official policies to regulate student content? Does anyone else have
> actual written policies? I posted this last week but didn't have much of a
> response.
>
> With Great Appreciation,
>
> 	Dawn in Tucson
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: art content policies-Help!
From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 19:50:40 -0500
X-Message-Number: 12
While my district does not have a written policy I have my own comfort zone 
on what I will show each level, and this is based on my knowledge of the 
culture I live in and what my parents deem acceptable. 4th & 5th aren't 
knowingly exposed to any nudity. 6th - 8th I don't show artwork with obvious
nudity, but I do have shelves upon shelves of art books that students may 
browse. I don't censor my books, but I do tell them that nudity in art is 
normal, but that if they are not mature enough to handle looking at my books
then they will lose the privelege. Same with the internet. I tell them that 
they turn it into something dirty and unpleasant when they point, laugh, and
share with their friends, and this is how I judge their ability to handle 
the material. There are so many artworks available that it is possible to 
teach these grades about great art/artists without the nudity. Again, you do
have to teach to your own personal culture - you know best what your parents
and community find acceptable.
~Michal
K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> I really need your help!. My boss and I are having a meeting on Friday 
> about
> acceptable content in art. (I teach 4th-8th Art) We are trying to develop 
> a
> policy that we all agree on, which is tough. My boss asked me to find out
> what other art departments' official policies are. Please help me!!! Do 
> you
> have official policies to regulate student content? Does anyone else have
> actual written policies? I posted this last week but didn't have much of a
> response.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: classroom management-- Stacie
From: Sheri Fried <sfried68@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 18:35:01 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 13
Hi Stacie
I teach K-5.  I have a few clean up routines that work
for me.  
For a non-messy project, one that does not involve the
sink or getting out of their seats, I get their
attention and inform them that the table that follows
clean up directions the best (not the quickest) will
get an art prize :drawing paper/coloring sheet/tracing
paper/etc. - they truly like this.  I know a lot of
you out there are against prizes, but sometimes it
really motivates students to work together and follow
directions.  I then explain that they must organize
their tables for the collectors by working as a team,
and stress NOT getting out of their seats, that will
disqualify their table.  They can not yell at a
tablemate, or grab something out of their hand.  I
find that with the peer pressure to clean up quickly,
quietly, and politely, this technique works for me.  I
also tell them that I will write down names of kids
who don't work with their table/teams to organize, and
those students will lose some of their next free
choice time.
For messy clean ups, painting, etc. :  I first explain
the procedure so they all know what is expected.  They
are to keep painting until I call their table.  When
called, they are to leave the paint trays/brushes and
go wash hands.  While they are up, I grab their
paintings and put on the drying rack.  After washing,
they get a coloring sheet (something associated with
the lesson) and markers or crayons, go back to their
tables and color quietly.  Again, I tell them I am
watching for the table that follows these directions
the best, and that table will get an art prize.  You
might be wondering when do the kids wash the paint
trays and brushes?  They don't.  When I first started
teaching, I thought it was so important for my kids to
learn the skill of properly washing brushes and trays.
 I have learned that this is not as important to me as
a calm, orderly classroom is.  So, I have a tub of
water prepared and simply dump all paint trays and
brushes in it, letting it soak til I have time to wash
them.  Usually, I have students who finish early and
want a job, or students who stay after school in a
latch key program who help me.  I seriously don't feel
I am keeping my students from learning an important
skill by not making them wash their stuff.  (maybe
their middle school teacher might think so!)
Enough already--
 good luck.
Sheri
____________
	
		
______________________________________________________ 
Yahoo! for Good 
Donate to the Hurricane Katrina relief effort. 
http://store.yahoo.com/redcross-donate3/ 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: motivating 4th graders
From: Jerry Vilenski <jvilenski@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 19:11:54 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 14
Here's some advice, for what it's worth:
 
I have found that, especially with upper elementary
students, projects and activities that are
specifically geared toward their interests and skill
levels are what keeps them excited about art. 
Motivating disinterested students is always an uphill
struggle, but with consistent discipline strategies,
over time, they will get the message you are serious
and start working.  I also find that liberal use of a
sense of humor tends to disarm the hard core types and
will eventually win them over. 
Having said all that, here is what I would do:
> clue into the regional culture and develop new or
alter old projects to that culture.
> 4th graders like to work with their hands, building
things, sculpting, claywork, paper mache, etc. are all
prime motivators that get kids excited and engaged. 
Drawing and design projects are ok with highly
motivated kids, but if they are not focused on that
type of activity, switch to 3d activities until they
are used to working with you, or at least use 3d as an
incentive to get through a paper activity.
>Physical activity also helps keep kids moving and
focused, so set up work stations at various locations
in the room so kids are not near each other for the
entire art class period and are kept busy at the
workstation getting crayons, brushes, etc.
>Make sure you have contact with each student during
the class period, so you can check progress and let
them know you have certain expectation of behavior and
performance.  Simply having them get in line to check
their work serves this purpose, or go around to
tables.
> Be crystal clear with your expectations as each
project begins, so there is no ambiguity in their
minds as to the rules or guidlines you expect to be
followed.
> If you need specific project ideas, write me at my
e-mail address, and I will be glad to send photos and
lessons your way.
 
Hope this helps,
 
Jerry
__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around 
http://mail.yahoo.com 
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: classroom management-- Stacie
From: StacieMich@aol.com
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 22:16:09 EDT
X-Message-Number: 15
Thanks.  Yes, I've been wondering the same thing.  I feel like my middle 
school students should have the responsibility of washing their stuff, but
they 
just seem to take too long.  I've been wondering if I should collect their 
stuff, either wash it myself or ask a helper to wash them and give that
student 
extra bucks or something.  I definitely need to figure this out.  The other 
problem is that I have no drying rack, so finding spots for 33 wet paintings
is 
interesting.  I've hung up clothelines, but it doesn't work so well with
that 
many paintings.  I am praying that they get me a rack soon.  I've been
begging 
for one since before I started.  They told me that they ordered it, but that
like like three months ago.  It would really help.  
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Subject: Re: art content policies-Help!
From: Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>
Date: Tue, 27 Sep 2005 20:49:14 -0600
X-Message-Number: 16
I'm starting my 3rd year of retirement but I'll put
my two cents in. I taught 6th - 8th art for 27 years
Our district never had any written guidelines
or official policy about content but I tried to impose
my own. I also did not allow cussing, fighting or
the word "no" in my classroom. I imposed my own
morals upon my students and if they didn't like it
"tough. As for art content: No beer, cigarettes, guns,
knifes, frontal nudity, etc. were some of my restrictions.
Gang signs and related symbols were the only real problem
cause they kept changing. Our school security officer was
good at keeping me clued in. I've done lessons around
Graffiti as art and the kids loved it. Administrators
can get real hung up on the silliest things. We did a
still-life with bottles with great renderings of glass
and reflected light. I displayed the art in a showcase
along with some of the many shapes of wine bottles we
used. I was told to remove them. We compromised by
turning the labels to the back. If you set some
reasonable standards the kids will cooperate. Also,
I seldom left the choice of subjects wide open. Some
content I used was: Animals, Birds, City Scapes,
White Water Rafting, Indoor Soccer, Cheerleaders,
Winter Olympics, Vases of Flowers, Musical Instruments,
Self Portraits (always a good one) etc. The possible list
is endless but I choose the major areas and supplied
resources and motivation. I don't believe in saying
"draw what you want today." I encouraged lots of
variety and experimentation within the content I
choose. I choose content based on degree of
difficulty, appropriateness to media, and if it
would fit into the sequence of lessons that came
before. I hope this helps.
				Woody
Dawn Malosh wrote:
> Hi Fellow Art Teachers!
> 
> I really need your help!. My boss and I are having a meeting on Friday
about
> acceptable content in art. (I teach 4th-8th Art) We are trying to develop
a
> policy that we all agree on, which is tough. My boss asked me to find out
> what other art departments' official policies are. Please help me!!! Do
you
> have official policies to regulate student content? Does anyone else have
> actual written policies? I posted this last week but didn't have much of a
> response.
> 
> With Great Appreciation,
> 
> 	Dawn in Tucson
-- 
	Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
		mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
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