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Re: [teacherartexchange] need more advice on classroom management, and Mike's response

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From: Bunki Kramer (bkramer_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Sep 25 2005 - 14:51:09 PDT


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> What is Bunki's method? Just curious.
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Hi. I believe I mentioned earlier in my post about how I handle some of the
problems Stacie has been having. These things work for me. Instead of giving
out bucks, slips of paper on the desk, ART on the board, I deal with it head
on with the student outside of the class structure as soon as possible.
There are so many reasons a child acts up and sometimes it might be a
potential fight with another student, scared to start the project, just
angry at the world, sometimes blowing off steam from another class, etc.

I get the rest of the class started on the intended project for that day and
then ask the student to step outside the door. I give him/her an
uncomfortable silence, looking them in the face, saying nothing for at least
a minute or two. Then I ask him to "tell me about it". I generally find out
a lot of interesting things...but...the uncomfortable silence in the
beginning is golden. They are bursting to tell you the real reason when you
let them talk. With this method I generally get an apology (without asking
for it) and it saves face for the little munchkin...and we all come out
winners.

> I changed behavior management strategies this year. I now give a
> warning, followed by a warning slip on a student's desk if the behavior
> continues. The warning slip stays on their desk til the end of class.
> If they behave themselves the rest of the period they can throw away the
> slip on the way out the door. If not, I pick up the slip and they move
> to the "chill chair" at my back counter, with their work. If the
> behavior happens at the end of the period, they spend the following
> period in the chill chair. A move to the chill chair drops their
> behavior grade for two weeks by a point. A second move to the chill
> chair in two weeks necessitates a call home from me. If their behavior
> is great for the next two weeks they get their grade raised back to a 4.
> Two moves in a two week period would drop it from a 4 to a 2 and a call
> home. I also use the ART sign on the board for noise control...if the
> whole class is loud, take off the T, still loud, take off the R, still
> loud take off the A and they put their heads down. This all works
> reasonably well. I'd like to hear Bunki's strategy. Oh, and I also
> have a LOUD big brass bell that I bought from school specialty. I ring
> it at times when I need every eye on me instantly. Not often. We
> practiced gabby chatter, I rang the bell, and they were silent. It
> works great.
>
> My advice is not to make things too complicated. I have been guilty of
> that myself, and can't keep up with it if it is too complicated. This
> system is simple and effective for me!
> Linda

Sounds complicated to me but whatever works for you is a good strategy too.
I just like to meet the problem head on, deal with it, and not worry about
keeping points or handing out bucks for things they should be doing anyway
in a civilized classroom. I save my prizes for "caught being extra good"
like helping a neighbor. BTW...I have 37-38 kids in my classes and behavior
is not always perfect and never will be in middle school plus there are just
some classes who never WILL get it all together due to personality meshes
and neediness. But...they always move on and you get new groups. That's goes
right into what I said earlier..."Every day is a new day". Toodles....Bunki

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