Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

[teacherartexchange] Thanks and another question

---------

StacieMich_at_TeacherArtExchange
Date: Sun Sep 25 2005 - 11:24:58 PDT


Thanks for all of your wonderful advice. So far, I've made checklists for my
table captains. I'm going to find buckets for quick paint brush collection
and for holding my goodies. I like the idea of giving out bucks for good
behavior and telling the students that when they acquire four, they may pick out a
prize. I'm getting ready to make a rubric for the cityscape painting they are
working on so they will know exactly what I will be looking for.

I have decided that if they are too loud tomorrow and cannot behave, I will
ask them to clean up right then and there. I'm trying to decide if I will ask
them to read quietly, put their heads down or draw quietly in their
sketchbooks. What do you think? Also, what should I do if they decide to chat at this
time?

I have a folder with detention slips in it pinned to my board for easy
access. I'm going to sign and fill out what I can on all of the forms tomorrow
morning so that I will have less work to fill out when a student earns a detention.

I'm going to do my best not to yell. I'll have to do something to get their
attention though. I swear, it gets so loud that I have to yell for them to
even hear me. I need to work that out. Maybe I'll simply go table by table to
tell them to quiet down or to ask them to clean up? Is that a better
approach? Rather than trying to get the whole class's attention?

Oh, also...I've told my students that they may not get out of their seats
without permission, yet several still do. I've been calmly telling them that
they need to go back to their seats and raise their hands. Should I now start
giving them consequences or continue to remind them?

Right now I'm trying to figure out the next assignment. I want to have them
make mandalas, but so many of the lessons I find are quiet
complicated...meaning I think it's too advanced for my middle school students. They barely know
how to use rulers and make straight lines. Can anyone suggest a simple
lesson, yet one where the results will be spectacular? I've been looking at the
circle of light lessons. I'm also trying to create basic powerpoint
transparencies just to explain what a mandala is, who uses them, why, the importance of
circles, etc... If anyone has done a similar project and can suggest something
simple, informative, concise yet effective, that would be great. I often find
that there is so much info out there, and I waste hours and hours digging
through it to make a simple lesson. I have two books on mandalas, but again,
very complicated.

Thanks. I have printed out all of your advice and am trying to figure out
what I can start with tomorrow. I really appreciate it!

Stacie

---
To unsubscribe go to 
http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html