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Re:[teacherartexchange] teacherartexchange digest: September 13, 2005

---------

From: Diane C. Gregory (dianegregory_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Sep 15 2005 - 12:50:06 PDT


some people do not find this kind of situation to be the delight of their
day...they find it overwhelming, especially if you have almost 30 or more
students. I believe this was the case with the teacher who started this
thread. So it is two issues: size of class and teaching multiple classes
within the same class. Of course it is manageable if you have small classes
like some who wrote in saying that they had only 16 students. But imagine
having three or more levels with 35 students as one person explained.

As a college professor, I had this situation in my art education methods classes
when I first started at Texas State. Over time we were able to change this so
we only taught one course at a time. When this situation improved, the quality
of the instruction improved and so did the numbers of students going into the
program. So in order to ensure quality we have to have a reasonable work load.
 I do not think having 30 or more students with students in many different
classes a reasonable work load. :-)

Diane

--
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
Studies in Art Education
Texas Woman's University
Denton, TX  76204
dgregory@mail.twu.edu
940-898-2540
Quoting Sidnie Miller <smiller@elko.k12.nv.us>:
> It's interesting to me how strongly you college teachers speak on this issue.
>  In my
> case, the 4th year studio kids are the delight of my day.  When I have a
> couple of
> independent studio kids in my foundations classes they are such a great
> example to the
> Freshmen and my reason to come to work!  I won't accept studio kids who I
> don't get along
> with or who don't work.  My school would be perfectly happy to have me teach
> just big
> single class subjects all day and the result would be that these talented
> kids would have
> nothing.  High School teachers who have classes of 6 kids are definitely
> looking at losing
> their jobs.
>
> >>> dianegregory@grandecom.net 09/14/05 7:38 PM >>>
> It may be normal for some private schools or some small schools.  However, it
> is
> not sound educational practice.  I would let your concerns be known and hold
> your ground.  Work with the counselor to provide a minimum of this type of
> thing.  They like it this way because it makes it easier to schedule
> students.
> Your job is to provide a sound educational experience not to make it is easy
> to
> schedule students.  Perhaps you could get them to approve 1 or 2 classes that
> would consist of multiple levels for a while and have an agreement to change
> this system over time.  Also build friends in high places and then work them
> to
> help you change things.  If they won't work with you to improve the
> situation, I
> would start looking for another job.  We must establish our own personal
> standards for what we will tolerate.  Let your argument be that you can not
> offer a sound educational program because this means you have multiple
> preparations and no one could manage this.  Do not say that you can not
> handle
> this.  Make it clear you do not want to handle this.  If not, we get walked
> all
> over.  Once you allow this without expressing your strong concerns, you will
> not
> be able to get far with the administration.  I have been thinking about
> providing some kind of assertiveness training for my pre-service art
> teachers.
> It seems that art teachers in general have difficulty confronting
> inappropriate
> practices.  I see this happen in higher education as well.  It has taken me
> years of working on myself to know how to talk with administrators about
> concerns and to work toward advocating for what is needed.  I am finally
> feeling successful.  It is hard, but once you start speaking up with a clear,
> controlled strong voice, you will be respected.  It does take time, but
> things
> can get better.  The first step is to begin to let them know that this is not
> acceptable.
>
> I hope this helps.
> --
> Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> Studies in Art Education
> Texas Woman's University
> Denton, TX  76204
> dgregory@mail.twu.edu
> 940-898-2540
>
>
> Quoting lesley <jlmc@erols.com>:
>
> > Teaching multiple classes within a period is what I have been asked to do
> > this year.  I have been told that this is normal for a HS art teacher. Is
> > It?
> >  I teach 4 periods like this and two other periods with one discipline. My
> > multi classes within a period are like the following: fundamentals with
> > studio 1 & 2 & another period with AP Art, Studio 1 & 2 ..  Is this what
> any
> > of you are doing?
> > I have been teaching for over 25 years and this is new to me to be a one
> > room school house.  I use my blackboard with instructions for each group
> and
> > try to spend time with each group.  I am stressed and unable to give only a
> > few minutes attention to each group.  Any suggestions?  Our school is
> > private and the teachers do not have a union.  Les
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
> > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
> > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2005 3:01 AM
> > Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 13, 2005
> >
> >
> > > TEACHERARTEXCHANGE Digest for Tuesday, September 13, 2005.
> > >
> > > 1. Need assistance
> > > 2. forward from an art therapist
> > > 3. Re: forward from an art therapist
> > > 4. Pinwheel sucesses
> > > 5. discount to subscribe to SchoolArts
> > > 6. 1st grade clean up: I need some tips!
> > > 7. Re: 1st grade clean up: I need some tips!
> > > 8. Re: 1st grade clean up: I need some tips!
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: Need assistance
> > > From: David Miller <tex.art@verizon.net>
> > > Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 04:27:18 -0400
> > > X-Message-Number: 1
> > >
> > > I am attempting to put together a presentation that explores the various
> > > interpretations of appropriate and inappropriate imagery in the context
> of
> > > the high school art class. I am a high school art teacher at Wissahickon
> > > HS
> > > in Ambler, PA.
> > >
> > > I am interested in challenges faced in terms of visual culture
> > > investigations, nudity, religion, politics, abortion, etc.
> > >
> > > Anecdotal stories, articles, policies, examples, etc. would be very
> > > appreciated. I'm hoping to do a presentation at the PAEA conference and
> > > the
> > > NAEA conference. It will be titled Appropriateness: Traversing the
> > > Hegemonic
> > > Minefield.
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > > David Miller
> > >
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: forward from an art therapist
> > > From: "Randy Menninghaus" <india99@infionline.net>
> > > Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 05:42:59 -0400
> > > X-Message-Number: 2
> > >
> > > I asked a dear friend who is also an art therapist to give advice to any
> > > art teacher who is dealing with survivors. I forwarded one ofour digests.
> > > I
> > > hope this will help any body who is dealing Randy in Maine
> > > :
> > >
> > > Rachelle?s description of her gift of art to some of the kids in the
> > > Astrodome in New Orleans was wonderful. Any good art teacher has the
> > > knowledge and sensitivity to bring kids art materials and to provide an
> > > art
> > > club/ art room environment so they can draw and tell their story. Sharing
> > > their work with others and telling their story provides both an excellent
> > > way for kids to explain to adults what they are thinking about and a
> > > healthy outlet for their energy. Don?t confuse her gift with art therapy.
> > >
> > > Art therapists, a legal designation, have both an art background and a
> > > counseling background, brought together in a master?s level training and
> > > licensing. Much of art therapy group work looks like an art class, but
> > > there are some serious differences. The art therapist will be able to
> tune
> > > into the kids who have real mental health issues and to use the group to
> > > support those kids in a safe and potentially healing manner. I am a
> > > state-certified art teacher, K-12, in Maine and I am also a qualified art
> > > therapist with a state LCPC license. I taught 22 years before switching
> > > careers, five of those years after I had received my art therapy
> training.
> > > I found a big difference between being an art teacher and an art
> > > therapist.
> > > I had to work to maintain appropriate boundaries as an art teacher and to
> > > respect the power of art making as an art therapist. I love both
> processes
> > > and I respect the differences.
> > >
> > > A qualified and caring art teacher can give kids the appropriate and
> > > wonderful respite from their problems that Rachelle did.
> > > Art teachers whowant to work with Katrina survivors and evacuees, here is
> > > my suggestion:
> > > Rather than get yourself in a difficult situation that may cause
> unwitting
> > > damage to already traumatized children, don?t pretend to be an art
> > > therapist if you are not trained. Instead, use your ability to supervise
> > > groups of kids using art materials and making art to tell stories and
> > > generally to find pleasurable activity amidst chaos and confusion. Art
> > > gives voice to finding a sense of unity and harmony with color, line and
> > > shape, etc. We art teachers know that. Trust the pleasure and power of
> > > art making and don?t try to provide therapy. Tune into the kids and if
> one
> > > or a few of them seem to be having an abnormal reaction to an abnormal
> > > situation, refer them to a mental health professional. You will be doing
> > > them a valuable service. Teachers are the front line for children; even
> > > art teachers do not need to be the school counselor, too. Let your love
> of
> > > art making and knowledge of group art making provide a marvelous respite
> > > for the children ? and the families as well - displaced by the hurricane.
> > > Provide children who need real therapy with references to real art
> > > therapists. Fran Clukey, PhD, RATh, LCPC (12 Sept 2005).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: Re: forward from an art therapist
> > > From: "Diane C. Gregory" <dianegregory@grandecom.net>
> > > Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 06:46:16 -0600
> > > X-Message-Number: 3
> > >
> > > Randy,
> > >
> > > Thanks for forwarding that advice from an art therapist.  Well said.
> > >
> > > Diane
> > > --
> > > Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> > > Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> > > Studies in Art Education
> > > Texas Woman's University
> > > Denton, TX  76204
> > > dgregory@mail.twu.edu
> > > 940-898-2540
> > >
> > >
> > > Quoting Randy Menninghaus <india99@infionline.net>:
> > >
> > >> I asked a dear friend who is also an art therapist to give advice to any
> > >> art teacher who is dealing with survivors. I forwarded one ofour
> digests.
> > >> I
> > >> hope this will help any body who is dealing Randy in Maine
> > >> :
> > >>
> > >> Rachelle?s description of her gift of art to some of the kids in the
> > >> Astrodome in New Orleans was wonderful. Any good art teacher has the
> > >> knowledge and sensitivity to bring kids art materials and to provide an
> > >> art
> > >> club/ art room environment so they can draw and tell their story.
> Sharing
> > >> their work with others and telling their story provides both an
> excellent
> > >> way for kids to explain to adults what they are thinking about and a
> > >> healthy outlet for their energy. Don?t confuse her gift with art
> therapy.
> > >>
> > >> Art therapists, a legal designation, have both an art background and a
> > >> counseling background, brought together in a master?s level training and
> > >> licensing. Much of art therapy group work looks like an art class, but
> > >> there are some serious differences. The art therapist will be able to
> > >> tune
> > >> into the kids who have real mental health issues and to use the group to
> > >> support those kids in a safe and potentially healing manner. I am a
> > >> state-certified art teacher, K-12, in Maine and I am also a qualified
> art
> > >> therapist with a state LCPC license. I taught 22 years before switching
> > >> careers, five of those years after I had received my art therapy
> > >> training.
> > >> I found a big difference between being an art teacher and an art
> > >> therapist.
> > >> I had to work to maintain appropriate boundaries as an art teacher and
> to
> > >> respect the power of art making as an art therapist. I love both
> > >> processes
> > >> and I respect the differences.
> > >>
> > >> A qualified and caring art teacher can give kids the appropriate and
> > >> wonderful respite from their problems that Rachelle did.
> > >> Art teachers whowant to work with Katrina survivors and evacuees, here
> is
> > >> my suggestion:
> > >> Rather than get yourself in a difficult situation that may cause
> > >> unwitting
> > >> damage to already traumatized children, don?t pretend to be an art
> > >> therapist if you are not trained. Instead, use your ability to supervise
> > >> groups of kids using art materials and making art to tell stories and
> > >> generally to find pleasurable activity amidst chaos and confusion. Art
> > >> gives voice to finding a sense of unity and harmony with color, line and
> > >> shape, etc. We art teachers know that. Trust the pleasure and power of
> > >> art making and don?t try to provide therapy. Tune into the kids and if
> > >> one
> > >> or a few of them seem to be having an abnormal reaction to an abnormal
> > >> situation, refer them to a mental health professional. You will be doing
> > >> them a valuable service. Teachers are the front line for children; even
> > >> art teachers do not need to be the school counselor, too. Let your love
> > >> of
> > >> art making and knowledge of group art making provide a marvelous respite
> > >> for the children ? and the families as well - displaced by the
> hurricane.
> > >> Provide children who need real therapy with references to real art
> > >> therapists. Fran Clukey, PhD, RATh, LCPC (12 Sept 2005).
> > >>
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> ---
> > >> To unsubscribe go to
> > >> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> > >>
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: Pinwheel sucesses
> > > From: "Leah Rachlis" <leah@pcisys.net>
> > > Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 09:24:09 -0600
> > > X-Message-Number: 4
> > >
> > > I planned to have my elementary classes work on pinwheels this week - I
> > > too
> > > switched from Pencils to straws - BUT  added a dollop of Model magic to
> > > the
> > > tip of the straw, it acts as a holder for the pin and a spacer at behind
> > > the
> > > wheel... as I sometimes do, I experimented on my Middle Schoolers before
> > > trying it with kindergarten! - worked out most of the bugs.
> > >
> > > We do not have a garden, to any grass but we will plant the (with duct
> > > tape)
> > > on the outer railing of our building on Wednesday - pretty cool project!
> > >
> > > Leah
> > > ----- Original Message -----
> > > From: "TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group digest"
> > > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > > To: "teacherartexchange digest recipients"
> > > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > > Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2005 1:00 AM
> > > Subject: teacherartexchange digest: September 12, 2005
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: discount to subscribe to SchoolArts
> > > From: Nancy Walkup <nwalkup@verizon.net>
> > > Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 19:15:09 -0500 (CDT)
> > > X-Message-Number: 5
> > >
> > > You can subscribe to SchoolArts at a discount ($16.00) if you are an
> > > undergraduate or graduate students. Go to
> > > http://www.davis-art.com/schoolarts/index.asp to subscribe. You will need
> > > the code ST1. University teachers can share this info with your students.
> > >
> > > Nancy
> > >
> > > rom: Nancy Walkup <nwalkup@verizon.net>
> > > Date: Tue Sep 13 04:42:59 CDT 2005
> > > To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> > > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > > Subject: Re: [teacherartexchange] forward from an art therapist
> > >
> > >
> > > From: Randy Menninghaus <india99@infionline.net>
> > > Date: Tue Sep 13 04:42:59 CDT 2005
> > > To: TeacherArtExchange Discussion Group
> > > <teacherartexchange@lists.pub.getty.edu>
> > > Subject: [teacherartexchange] forward from an art therapist
> > >
> > > I asked a dear friend who is also an art therapist to give advice to any
> > > art teacher who is dealing with survivors. I forwarded one ofour digests.
> > > I
> > > hope this will help any body who is dealing Randy in Maine
> > > :
> > >
> > > Rachelle?s description of her gift of art to some of the kids in the
> > > Astrodome in New Orleans was wonderful. Any good art teacher has the
> > > knowledge and sensitivity to bring kids art materials and to provide an
> > > art
> > > club/ art room environment so they can draw and tell their story. Sharing
> > > their work with others and telling their story provides both an excellent
> > > way for kids to explain to adults what they are thinking about and a
> > > healthy outlet for their energy. Don?t confuse her gift with art therapy.
> > >
> > > Art therapists, a legal designation, have both an art background and a
> > > counseling background, brought together in a master?s level training and
> > > licensing. Much of art therapy group work looks like an art class, but
> > > there are some serious differences. The art therapist will be able to
> tune
> > > into the kids who have real mental health issues and to use the group to
> > > support those kids in a safe and potentially healing manner. I am a
> > > state-certified art teacher, K-12, in Maine and I am also a qualified art
> > > therapist with a state LCPC license. I taught 22 years before switching
> > > careers, five of those years after I had received my art therapy
> training.
> > > I found a big difference between being an art teacher and an art
> > > therapist.
> > > I had to work to maintain appropriate boundaries as an art teacher and to
> > > respect the power of art making as an art therapist. I love both
> processes
> > > and I respect the differences.
> > >
> > > A qualified and caring art teacher can give kids the appropriate and
> > > wonderful respite from their problems that Rachelle did.
> > > Art teachers whowant to work with Katrina survivors and evacuees, here is
> > > my suggestion:
> > > Rather than get yourself in a difficult situation that may cause
> unwitting
> > > damage to already traumatized children, don?t pretend to be an art
> > > therapist if you are not trained. Instead, use your ability to supervise
> > > groups of kids using art materials and making art to tell stories and
> > > generally to find pleasurable activity amidst chaos and confusion. Art
> > > gives voice to finding a sense of unity and harmony with color, line and
> > > shape, etc. We art teachers know that. Trust the pleasure and power of
> > > art making and don?t try to provide therapy. Tune into the kids and if
> one
> > > or a few of them seem to be having an abnormal reaction to an abnormal
> > > situation, refer them to a mental health professional. You will be doing
> > > them a valuable service. Teachers are the front line for children; even
> > > art teachers do not need to be the school counselor, too. Let your love
> of
> > > art making and knowledge of group art making provide a marvelous respite
> > > for the children ? and the families as well - displaced by the hurricane.
> > > Provide children who need real therapy with references to real art
> > > therapists. Fran Clukey, PhD, RATh, LCPC (12 Sept 2005).
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ---
> > > To unsubscribe go to
> > > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> > >
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: 1st grade clean up: I need some tips!
> > > From: marcia <marciadotcom@yahoo.com>
> > > Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 18:27:57 -0700 (PDT)
> > > X-Message-Number: 6
> > >
> > >
> > > I am now teaching elementary this year after teaching
> > > middle school for 3 1/2 years.  So far, I am enjoying
> > > it. It is a big change from middle school!
> > >
> > > All of my classes are going okay and the kids are
> > > following directions pretty well, except for one
> > > class.  This is a first grade class at the end of the
> > > day and when I tell them to "put away their markers
> > > and crayons" they think this means to get out of their
> > > seats and run around the room and goof off.  I know I
> > > need to reteach them the procedures for clean up.
> > > Should I do this at the beginning of the class when
> > > they are calm or at the end of the period when we are
> > > ready to pack up?  Does anyone have any tips for
> > > managing and teaching clean up procedures to little
> > > ones? Thanks in advance! Marcia
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > __________________________________
> > > Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
> > > http://mail.yahoo.com
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: Re: 1st grade clean up: I need some tips!
> > > From: "Chris Lincoln" <artlover44@socal.rr.com>
> > > Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 18:56:08 -0700
> > > X-Message-Number: 7
> > >
> > > Marcia,
> > >
> > > I teach 600 students, K-8, at a Catholic school in Calif.....my best
> > > advice
> > > is at clean-up time start counting from 10 down to 0.  I let them know at
> > > the beginning of the school year this is how clean-up works.....by the
> > > time
> > > you get to 0 you expect that they will be seated in their seats and their
> > > table will be "impeccably" clean.  Don't ask how or why, but they respond
> > > sooooo well to this game.
> > >
> > > Best of luck,
> > >
> > > Chris
> > >
> > >
> > > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> > >
> > > Subject: Re: 1st grade clean up: I need some tips!
> > > From: "M. Austin" <whest177@wheatstate.com>
> > > Date: Tue, 13 Sep 2005 21:28:46 -0500
> > > X-Message-Number: 8
> > >
> > > Before you begin cleaning up you might make clear your expectations.
> Maybe
> > > something like "after we finish drawing our dog it will be time to begin
> > > cleaning up. We will put our markers in the bags, stack our artwork
> neatly
> > > on the table in a pile, and then wait for my super special instructions".
> > > Then, do different things for line up. One day I might line them up by
> > > quietest table first, some days it is by color clothes (whoever is
> wearing
> > > the color that red and blue mixed together make may line up), some days
> it
> > > is by individual students, some days it is by who is standing quietly
> > > behind
> > > the red chairs (I have 2 different color chairs). The students know that
> > > it
> > > is routine to clean up, stack their artwork, and stand quietly behind
> > > their
> > > chairs, but they don't know how we're going to line up, so they have to
> > > listen closely, because we ALL know how important it is to line up first!
> > > *L*
> > > ~Michal
> > > K-12 Kansas Art Teacher
> > > http://www.geocities.com/theartkids
> > >
> > >>
> > >> All of my classes are going okay and the kids are
> > >> following directions pretty well, except for one
> > >> class.  This is a first grade class at the end of the
> > >> day and when I tell them to "put away their markers
> > >> and crayons" they think this means to get out of their
> > >> seats and run around the room and goof off.  I know I
> > >> need to reteach them the procedures for clean up.
> > >> Should I do this at the beginning of the class when
> > >> they are calm or at the end of the period when we are
> > >> ready to pack up?  Does anyone have any tips for
> > >> managing and teaching clean up procedures to little
> > >> ones? Thanks in advance! Marcia
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ---
> > >
> > > END OF DIGEST
> > >
> > > ---
> > > leave-teacherartexchange-46949Y@lists.pub.getty.edu
> > >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
> >
>
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
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