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Re: [teacherartexchange] Abundance

---------

From: Diane C. Gregory (dianegregory_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sat Sep 03 2005 - 19:26:54 PDT


well said Woody. It does take a lot of relationship building. And yes it takes
more than just complaining. Concerted consistent action must be taken.

--
Dr. Diane C. Gregory
Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
Studies in Art Education
Texas Woman's University
Denton, TX  76204
dgregory@mail.twu.edu
940-898-2540
Quoting Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>:
> Diane,
> 	I certainly would work with counselors first. I used to
> bring the male counselor frozen catfish fillets. I brought the
> lady candy and made signs and decorations for her. I set my room
> to seat 24 and went to the counselors when I hit 23. I developed
> a close relationship with my principals as well. But I still say
> nothing beats going to the top. I developed a working relationship
> with our superintendents. So much so that new principals would
> tell me "your friend the superintendent is here" when we had a
> school visit. As for the school board, change them. Nothing works
> better that electing a new board. We did it. Teachers can walk
> door to door and get out the votes needed cause so few voters
> turn out in those elections. Try all avenues, and be assertive.
> Action gets results. Yes I am idealistic, but I've seen it done.
> I had reasonable class sizes most of my years in teaching.
> Too many art teachers just complain, put up with it or quit.
> It can be corrected but it takes hard, consistent work.
> 					Woody
>
>
> Diane C. Gregory wrote:
> > What is mean spirited is school counselors and administrators who don't
> care.
> > It is totally unreasonable to put up with these working conditions.  I have
> > also seen school boards who say that you should even be glad you have an
> art
> > program.
> >
> > As long as we continue to put up with these kinds of attitudes we have no
> one to
> > blame but ourselves.
> >
> > I have listened to all the problems that people are having on this list:
> no
> > supplies, no equipment, overcrowding, no respect...one can not teach art
> and
> > teach it effectively when there are too many children in the class...this
> is
> > the bottom line...and teachers are left to fend for themselves.
> >
> > I'm sorry but this is inexcusable.  Woody, bless your heart, it is great to
> have
> > this idealistic notion that we can fight for the kids and that you can
> believe
> > that someone will eventually listen.  The bottom line is that this teacher
> has
> > too many students and can't handle all of these students.  The class size
> must
> > be reduced and done so immediately.  We can not teach art effectively in
> this
> > type of environment--it does a disservice to everyone.  By taking a
> position of
> > no tolerance, we are fighting for our kids.
> >
> > Did you know that the number one reason people leave the teaching
> profession?
> > It is working conditions like this and a lack of anyone being able to
> change it.
> > So many teachers, including art teachers, leave the profession in an
> average of
> > 3 to 5 years.  Think of the time, money and effort a teacher goes through
> to
> > get educated to teach.  What a waste...So this is important...It is
> important
> > to take immediate action not only for your class, but also for your own
> > professional future.  Waiting until the school board can act is a long term
> > solution and doubtful at best.
> >
> > My advice is to work through the school counselors to reduce class sizes
> and
> > failing that I would have students reassigned in whatever way you can.  I
> am not
> > talking about getting rid of special education students.  I agree with you
> > Woody, many special education students do very well in art classes and are
> a
> > joy to teach.  Many "at risk" students are students who have drug problems,
> > alcohol problems, behavior problems.  These students are usually very
> > bright...I am talking about having students reassigned who don't take the
> class
> > seriously and fail to be able to pass a test for which they are capable of
> > passing if they only would study and apply themselves.  Some counselors put
> > students in art classes because they know the student has a history of not
> > working or applying themselves.  They think it is an easy class.  Students
> > think so too.  It sounds harsh. It does sound mean.  We have to fight and
> fight
> > hard to have reasonable working conditions.  It goes against the grain of
> most
> > art teachers...However, we can not save the world unless we have a
> reasonable
> > environment in which to work.
> > --
> > Dr. Diane C. Gregory
> > Director, Undergraduate & Graduate
> > Studies in Art Education
> > Texas Woman's University
> > Denton, TX  76204
> > dgregory@mail.twu.edu
> > 940-898-2540
> >
> >
> > Quoting Woody Duncan <woodyduncan@comcast.net>:
> >
> >
> >>Diane C. Gregory wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>Have you had a heart to heart conversation with the guidance folks?  Are
> >>
> >>you
> >>
> >>>possibly getting a lot of "at risk" students?  If you get no cooperation
> >>
> >>from
> >>
> >>>administration or the counseling folks, and you are having trouble
> managing
> >>
> >>the
> >>
> >>>class, one tactic that might work is to give a hard test so that some
> >>
> >>students
> >>
> >>>will go to the counselor and change the class themselves.
> >>
> >>There must be other solutions rather than giving students work they
> >>can't handle. Isn't this what we complain that NCLB is doing ? NCLB
> >>requires special ed students who read well below grade level to be
> >>tested at grade/age level. This is mean spirited and counter productive.
> >>We need to take the students where they are and help them improve
> >>and grow. I taught in a Middle School where a major portion of the
> >>students were "at risk". They were great kids and really wanted to
> >>learn. Please don't kick them out. Go to the school board with your
> >>concerns. They usually see the stats that are presented to them and
> >>assume that a class size average of 23.5 mean that the numbers you
> >>really have. That photos and rosters to the school board meeting.
> >>Take parents with you. Things will change. Local school officials
> >>will treat you differently when they know you stand up for the kids.
> >>					Woody
> >>
> >>--
> >>	Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> >>		mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
> >>
> >>35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> >>in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> >>http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> >>Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> >>Albuquerque, NM    87199-1703
> >>
> >>?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> >>is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> >>of your artwork that soars.?              from: ?Art & Fear?
> >>
> >>Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> >>http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> >>Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> >>http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html
> >>Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
> >>http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html
> >>
> >>
> >>---
> >>To unsubscribe go to
> >>http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ---
> > To unsubscribe go to
> > http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
> >
>
>
> --
> 	Woody, Retired in Albuquerque
> 		mailto:woodyduncan@comcast.net
>
> 35 Quality Middle School Art Lessons
> in powerpoint format, on one CD $17 (includes shipping)
> http://www.taospaint.com/QualityLessons.html
> Ordering Address: PO Box 91703
> Albuquerque, NM    87199-1703
>
> ?The function of the overwhelming majority of your artwork
> is simply to teach you how to make the small fraction
> of your artwork that soars.?              from: ?Art & Fear?
>
> Woody's Watercolor Portfolio:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Portfolio/Watercolors.html
> Newest Fantastic Triplet Pics:
> http://www.taospaint.com/Spring05/Photos.html
> Your Invite to Woody's Exhibit:
> http://www.taospaint.com/ArtShow/Invite.html
>
>
> ---
> To unsubscribe go to
> http://www.getty.edu/education/teacherartexchange/unsubscribe.html
>
>
---
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