Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

/active hands

---------

From: Sears, Ellen (ESears_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Thu Sep 23 2004 - 06:38:35 PDT


there is research that shows that when your hands are active, so is your
brain...
I have elaborate doodles from meetings, classes etc - if I didn't focus on
the doodles, I would be crawling out of my skin. They are the only way I
can focus. And I can read them in a way - find where they started and I can
'read' the presentation from start to finish.
 
http://www.scholastic.com/earlylearner/age4/learning/pre_buildbrain.htm
<http://www.scholastic.com/earlylearner/age4/learning/pre_buildbrain.htm>
 
"Fiddle" toys to keep your hands busy while you focus; water to keep you
refreshed; chocolate and peppermint to breathe enhancing brain function;
hands-on "tools" for active learning.

http://www.4j.lane.edu/wallace/train_04_01_03.html
<http://www.4j.lane.edu/wallace/train_04_01_03.html>

Mel Levine's philosophy - active hands to help focus - silly putty, squishy
toys, rubber bands - not that kind...

Why Waldorf schools teach knitting to all of the kids:

Over the past 75 years, Waldorf schools have taught their first graders to
knit before they formally learn to read or manipulate numbers. Carol
Clifton, a handwork teacher for 27 years at the Sacramento Waldorf School in
California, says that "handwork is part of the education we feel is
necessary for children to be healthy. The more you use your body, the better
you can use it. Movement helps form pathways of thinking, problem solving,
and higher-functioning thinking. What you feel with your fingers can make
you think better."

Ellen in KY

---