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getting the "hasties" to slow down and think.....

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From: Bunki Kramer (bkramer_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Tue Sep 10 2002 - 06:49:45 PDT


from: Bunki Kramer (bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us)
Los Cerros Middle School
968 Blemer Road
Danville, CA 94526
http://www.lcms.srvusd.k12.ca.us/newKramer/KramerMain.html
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From: "Carolyn Keigley" <Carolyn@4snowart.com>
Since this is my first year at HS level one problem that I am having is with
the
"young " freshmen who finish projects hastily in minutes while the rest of
the students spend 3 to 5 days on the same projects.
Any ideas to get these guys into quality work from within ?
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I was going to suggest the same basic answer that seems similar to your
other answers. Slow them down with a "reflection" method. Peer analysis is
powerful and workable...either orally or even better....written. When the
class is finished with their work, the work is put up on the cabinet walls
with a little tiny # on each made out of const. paper...no names. They are
to write about their favorite one in the class and why it works, their least
favorite # and why, the goals of the project, did their own work meet the
goals and why or why not, what would they do differently if time, what would
their grade be and why, and a few interesting prompts like...why did you use
that color or what is your emphasis. It may not solve the problem with this
particular lesson but the next project will be thought more about you can be
assured. If their work is going to be critiqued by their peers, they pay
more attention. I certainly don't do it for all projects but enough to make
it workable. Toodles.....Bunki

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