Note: To protect the privacy of our members, e-mail addresses have been removed from the archived messages. As a result, some links may be broken.

Find Lesson Plans on getty.edu! GettyGames

Re: Perspective drawing in 7th/8th grade

---------

From: Bunki Kramer (bkramer_at_TeacherArtExchange)
Date: Sun Sep 08 2002 - 12:47:32 PDT


from: Bunki Kramer (bkramer@srvusd.k12.ca.us)
Los Cerros Middle School
968 Blemer Road
Danville, CA 94526
http://www.lcms.srvusd.k12.ca.us/newKramer/KramerMain.html
*******************************************

>From: Woody Duncan <wduncan@kc.rr.com>
> I'm sure there is a portion of "work ethic/enthusiasm" that causes
> some students to "barely get it". Yet I suspect that a larger factor is that
> they are just not ready for it, yet. I feel it's mostly a developmental thing.
> Also some students just can't seem to see it. They may be very smart and
> cooperative in many other areas but spacial/visual may not be their strength.
*************************

I'm in agreement with Woody's assessment also but would take it a step
further. I don't think it's a "work ethic/enthusiasm" thing as much as it's
an "understanding" thing. But I also don't think it's totally a
"spacial/visual" thing alone either. This particular lesson seems to me to
defy all your normal parameters of an art lesson. By that I mean...I've had
really good artists in my room NOT understand how perspective is
accomplished even though they can put the P&Es together in an art piece
easily and their understanding of artistic emotion is extraordinary. I've
even had an exceptionally great artist in my classroom leave and become
another teacher's student aide because he was so frustrated and couldn't
handle not understanding an art concept. (I lost him and still feel pretty
bad about that).

I personally feel that it's one of those very queer logic-visual
things...using both areas of the brain...and having to get both sides of the
brain to work in UNISON to solve the perspective problem. It seems that one
side always want to take over and you need BOTH sides equally to accomplish
perspective. You need to "see" it to understand it and you need to
"understand" it to see it. Some of my otherwise un-artistic kids can pull
this off without a hitch. Some of my artistic kids can't. It seems to defy
teaching logic, doesn't it? It will always be an interesting thing to
debate. Toodles....Bunki

---