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Lesson Plans


Art and Spontaneity

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Larry Seiler (lseiler@ez-net.com)
Sat, 30 Oct 1999 06:06:58 -0500


> Date: Fri, 29 Oct 1999 16:43:25 -0700
> From: "Joel J Murray" <joel3>
> Subject: Art and Spontaneity

> I'd like to know at what age the spontaneous level of artwork stops.
=
> Many times throughout the development stages of art the spontaneous =
> interest fades out, usually around 8th, 9th and 10th grade.
> I feel this is important in the field of art education because we want =
> art to be incorporated into their learning. What causes this, when does
=
> this happen, and how do you fix it. It would be nice to know when this =
> occurs so we can begin to address this loss of spontaneous artwork.

Joel...
Not wishing to be coy....yet, can't help but seem somewhat snide about it.
It seems to happen when the reality of an eventual graduation in sight
necessitates choosing between electives or taking required courses to
satisfy college entrance. Not only does it compete with the limited
opportunities to take art from thereon, but there is no doubt an
unconscious sense that forsaking notions of taking art further is a step
toward putting away "childish" things and embracing maturity. Preparing
for college is the responsible thing to do....and art classes therefore are
for those not yet having to face such decisions related to their future and
inevitable maturation.

Those of us that are artists as well as teachers have learned to never put
our crayons away. As such...the world deplores our prolonged nurtured
state of childishness, while at the same time envying it.

Larry Seiler
WetCanvas Artist's page-
http://www.wetcanvas.com/Gallery/S/Larry_Seiler/index.html
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable man
persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress
depends on the unreasonable man." George Bernard Shaw