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Lesson Plans


Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1806

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Robin Brooks (benjamin)
Tue, 26 Oct 1999 07:13:06 -0400


re: How to organize your art room storage facilities

Hi! I would recommend defining two types of storage: long term and daily
use. Long term storage would be for bulk materials from your supply order.
I always distinguish between "wet" and "dry", wet being any paints and
painting tools, inks, etc., and dry being paper, pencils and other drawing
materials such as chalks. Clay needs it's own storage, preferably in a
locked closet (kids love to puncture the plastic bags, causing this
precious commodity to dry out).
Wet materials should be stored as near the sink area as possible, to make
for easier clean ups.

It is also helpful to have some locking storage; preferably a closet, but
if not, a large steel cabinet or even a file cabinet to keep "valuable"
stuff that kids like to lift such as new sets of markers, masking tape,
etc., etc.

Daily use storage should be organized to give students access to the range
of materials they will need for art each day. Materials can be rotated to
these open shelves and counters based on the current unit/lesson. I like
low open shelves for trays and cans of drawing materials such as markers,
oil crayons and basic tools like rulers, scissors, etc. I use inexpensive
plastic trays to sort materials. These then can be carried by students to
their work tables. It is easier than grabbing a handful of pastels or
markers. I also use open shelving, when possible, to store small quantities
of basic types of paper. I find that students need to be trained to value
this resource and handle it properly. I teach careful use and maintenance
of daily supply areas a part of the class. As often as possible, I build
in choice to my lessons and teach the concept of "mixed media" for many art
projects. By making a range of basic materials available to students, it
empowers them to make expressive choices based upon their knowledge of
basic art media.

You are wise to consider carefully the storage arrangement in your art
classroom!

Good luck, and let me know if you have any further questions.

Robin in Maine

----------
> From: artsednet-digest <owner-artsednet-digest.edu>
> To: artsednet-digest.edu
> Subject: artsednet-digest V2 #1806
> Date: Monday, October 25, 1999 9:41 PM
>
>
> artsednet-digest Monday, October 25 1999 Volume 02 : Number
1806
>
>
>
> This edition includes :
> My fifth graders
> Dumbing down is driving me NUTS!
> Re: Dumbing down is driving me NUTS!
> Re: art room tables and chairs/stools
> Fw: 5th Grade Project
> Re: How to Organize Your Art Room--Storage Facilities
> Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1802
> Re: talk quiet
> Re: Dumbing down is driving me NUTS!
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 19:32:44 -0500
> From: "William S. Covington, Jr." <wscjrc>
> Subject: My fifth graders
>
> Today I employed the fifth graders to teach the Kindergarten and First
> grade, class by class, a simple task which we use as a center. The
> fifth graders are everyone's least favorite class and they have given me
> plenty of trouble over the last few years. They were so wonderful!
> Even the most unfocused among them gave those little ones their
> undivided attention. They stayed with it for two and one half hours.
> By the end of each 25 minute session each youngster could ply two
> strands (and more) together into "rope" and tie the ends with an
> overhand knot. I will not soon forget this day. I am very proud of
> them and every other teacher at school knows it!
> June C.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 20:54:10 -0400
> From: "Lisa Skeen" <lpskeen@living-tree.net>
> Subject: Dumbing down is driving me NUTS!
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_0105_01BF1F2B.1619AF20
> Content-Type: text/plain;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> Y'all, I confess I'm just about ready to quit this job. I have never =
> been so frustrated over anything in my life as I am about having to dumb
=
> down (it seems like) everything I do because the kids in my school =
> aren't up to grade level. Is this my fault (or that of any other =
> teacher in my school)? No; we are a brand new school, and dealing with =
> the product of the local public school system. Is any kid going to do =
> better unless you push him to do better? No.
> =20
> I'm not allowed to give a student a zero (even if he's earned it), I =
> have to give him a grade of sixty nine (the high end of the F grade =
> range) instead, because a zero is not an F and is too hard to recover =
> from. (Go figure on that one.)
>
> I'm not allowed to give a 2 page paper assignment to 3rd grade because =
> "that's too much for them." This, in a school where there's supposed to
=
> be 30 minutes of homework per day per subject. Last time I looked, Art =
> was a subject.
>
> Now I'm not going to be allowed to give real grades to any of the =
> classes. We had agreed that K-2 would get E,S,or N grades, and 3 - 5 =
> and eventually - 8 would get letter grades. Now, 3 days before report =
> card day, my principal is taking a poll of the other 2 specialists, and =
> asking other school principals what THEY're doing, and I'm going to end =
> up having to give ESN grades to all levels. What this says to me is, =
> "Art is not important enough to warrant a grade".
>
> Supposedly there is a law that says I have to do all this dumbing down.
=
> Joe Kid can have a conference with his parent and the special ed teacher
=
> and they decide that every grade has to be curved for Joe, to whatever =
> degree such that, for example, if he makes an 80 I have to call it an A.
=
> This is not fair to the other kids, much less to Joe, who could do the =
> work if somebody would insist that he do it instead of playing around =
> all the time.
>
> I am just about ready to explode. Or maybe implode. I'm sure it'll be =
> whichever does the least damage to anyone else, or the least good =
> either. :(
>
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_0105_01BF1F2B.1619AF20
> Content-Type: text/html;
> charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
> <HTML><HEAD>
> <META content=3D"text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1" =
> http-equiv=3DContent-Type>
> <META content=3D"MSHTML 5.00.2721.2900" name=3DGENERATOR>
> <STYLE></STYLE>
> </HEAD>
> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>
> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>Y'all, I confess I'm just about ready to quit this =
> job.&nbsp;=20
> I have never been so frustrated over anything in my life as I am about =
> having to=20
> dumb down (it seems like) everything I do because the kids in my school =
> aren't=20
> up to grade level.&nbsp; Is this my fault (or that of any other teacher =
> in my=20
> school)?&nbsp; No; we are a brand new school, and dealing with the =
> product of=20
> the local public school system.&nbsp; Is any kid going to do better =
> unless you=20
> push him to do better?&nbsp; No.</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV><FONT size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>I'm not allowed to give a student a zero (even if =
> he's earned=20
> it), I have to give him a grade of sixty nine (the high end of the F =
> grade=20
> range) instead, because a zero is not an F and is too hard to recover=20
> from.&nbsp; (Go figure on that one.)</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>I'm not allowed to give a 2 page paper assignment to
=
> 3rd grade=20
> because&nbsp;"that's too much for them."&nbsp;&nbsp;This, in a school =
> where=20
> there's supposed to be 30 minutes of homework per day per subject.&nbsp;
=
> Last=20
> time I looked, Art was a subject.</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>Now I'm not going to be allowed to give real grades =
> to any of=20
> the classes.&nbsp; We had agreed that K-2 would get E,S,or N grades, and
=
> 3 - 5=20
> and eventually - 8 would get letter grades.&nbsp; Now, 3 days before =
> report card=20
> day, my principal is taking a poll of the other 2 specialists, and =
> asking other=20
> school principals what THEY're doing, and I'm going to end up having to =
> give ESN=20
> grades to all levels.&nbsp; What this says to me is, "Art is not =
> important=20
> enough to warrant a grade".</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>Supposedly there is a law that says I have to do all
=
> this=20
> dumbing down.&nbsp; Joe Kid can have a conference with his parent and =
> the=20
> special ed teacher and they decide that every grade has to be curved for
=
> Joe, to=20
> whatever degree such that, for example, if he makes an 80 I have to call
=
> it an=20
> A.&nbsp; This is not fair to the other kids, much less to Joe, =
> who&nbsp;could do=20
> the work if somebody would insist that he&nbsp;do it instead of playing =
> around=20
> all the time.</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV><FONT size=3D2>I am just about ready to explode.&nbsp; Or maybe=20
> implode.&nbsp; I'm sure it'll be whichever does the least damage to =
> anyone else,=20
> or the least good either. :(</FONT></DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>
>
> - ------=_NextPart_000_0105_01BF1F2B.1619AF20--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 21:12:19 -0400
> From: ricki fromkin <fromkinr>
> Subject: Re: Dumbing down is driving me NUTS!
>
> Lisa Skeen wrote:
> >
> > Y'all, I confess I'm just about ready to quit this job. I have never
> > been so frustrated over anything in my life as I am about having to
> > dumb down (it seems like) everything I do because the kids in my
> > school aren't up to grade level. Is this my fault (or that of any
> > other teacher in my school)? No; we are a brand new school, and
> > dealing with the product of the local public school system. Is any
> > kid going to do better unless you push him to do better? No.
> >
> > I'm not allowed to give a student a zero (even if he's earned it), I
> > have to give him a grade of sixty nine (the high end of the F grade
> > range) instead, because a zero is not an F and is too hard to recover
> > from. (Go figure on that one.)
> >
> > I'm not allowed to give a 2 page paper assignment to 3rd grade
> > because "that's too much for them." This, in a school where there's
> > supposed to be 30 minutes of homework per day per subject. Last time
> > I looked, Art was a subject.
> >
> > Now I'm not going to be allowed to give real grades to any of the
> > classes. We had agreed that K-2 would get E,S,or N grades, and 3 - 5
> > and eventually - 8 would get letter grades. Now, 3 days before report
> > card day, my principal is taking a poll of the other 2 specialists,
> > and asking other school principals what THEY're doing, and I'm going
> > to end up having to give ESN grades to all levels. What this says to
> > me is, "Art is not important enough to warrant a grade".
> >
> > Supposedly there is a law that says I have to do all this dumbing
> > down. Joe Kid can have a conference with his parent and the special
> > ed teacher and they decide that every grade has to be curved for Joe,
> > to whatever degree such that, for example, if he makes an 80 I have to
> > call it an A. This is not fair to the other kids, much less to Joe,
> > who could do the work if somebody would insist that he do it instead
> > of playing around all the time.
> >
> > I am just about ready to explode. Or maybe implode. I'm sure it'll
> > be whichever does the least damage to anyone else, or the least good
> > either. :(
> >
> Lisa,
>
> I really feel for you. I myself wonder in amazement about our education
> system. Why is it such a problem to ask our students to work hard in
> order to achieve success? I'm teaching Art Foundations in an urban HS
> where the students are totally catered to without doing anything to earn
> this reward? I know my school is trying to build many student's self
> esteem, since a good number of them have grown up without a stable home
> environment. This is good, but I believe self esteem is built around
> personal achievement in doing a job or task well, getting a good grade,
> etc. By excusing students from learning or making things too easy for
> them, schools are actually hurting these kids in the long run. They're
> going to have a hell of a time in the real world coping with all life
> has to offer. It really is disheartening working in this environment.
> Sometimes I think I'd rather not teach than to become a part of a system
> that doesn't promote constructive learning, or simply that I don't
> believe in. Do you think most schools are like this?
>
> Ricki
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 21:15:31 EDT
> From: Deeknik
> Subject: Re: art room tables and chairs/stools
>
> I got metal stools this year and they have been great. The kids have to
sit
> up and can't lean back in the chairs. It is also easier to put the
stools
> out of the way when need more room.
>
> Debbie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 20:20:25 -0400
> From: "Linda Kelty" <lckelty>
> Subject: Fw: 5th Grade Project
>
> This was forwarded to me and seemed worth sharing and asking others to
help
> this class. Hope you don't mind! Thank you for encouraging these
students.
> Linda
> >> > > >
> >> > > > >Hello!
> >> > > > >We are in Grade 5 at Bill Arp Elementary School in
Douglasville,
> >GA
> >> > > > >which is about 20 minutes west of Atlanta, GA USA. We have
decided
> >to
> >> > > > >map an email project. We are curious to see where in the world
our
> >> > > > >email will travel between the period of Sept. 21 - Nov. 19,
1999.
> >We
> >> > > > >would like your help. If you receive this message, we would
like
> >you
> >> > to
> >> > > > >do two things: 1) Email us and tell us where you live.
> >> > > > >2) Forward our message to as many people as you can.
> >> > > > >Thank you for any help that you can give! Our email address is
> >> > > > >class5a1999
> >> > > > >Your friends,
> >> > > > >Mr. Blevins' Grade 5 Class
> >> > > > >Bill Arp Elementary School
> >> > > > >Douglasville, GA USA
> >> > > >
> >> > > > ______________________________________________________
> >> > > >
> >> > >
> >> >
> >> > ______________________________________________________
> >> > Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 20:24:10 -0500
> From: Rick <rlarson>
> Subject: Re: How to Organize Your Art Room--Storage Facilities
>
> Hi, I'd put all of your markers, etc in a lockable storage . I also
think that
> one of those drawer units to store large paper and prints. 2cents...
Betsy
>
> Eliza Jones wrote:
>
> > People with experience: What storage/organizational things do
you
> > think are essential? I moved from an art cart to an art room last week
and I
> > am in the process of deciding what kinds of storage units to buy. I
have
> > shelves and tables. What's the best way to store 2d and 3d student
work,
> > markers, pencils, paper, tools? I have some ideas, but I'd love to hear
what
> > really works.
> >
> > Many, many thanks to all!
> > Eliza
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 20:25:30 -0500
> From: Rick <rlarson>
> Subject: Re: artsednet-digest V2 #1802
>
> Hey, this is a different Betsy. There must be alot of us out there.
betsy
>
> steve wrote:
>
> > I have attempted to interact with this really wonderful group but I
can
> > never get my messages to go through...yes I have followed all list
serve
> > direections...but now I can not be removed from the list because there
is
> > no record of my being registered...someone help
> > thanks
> > betsy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 20:34:27 -0500
> From: Rick <rlarson>
> Subject: Re: talk quiet
>
> I also wait until everyone is settled. Then we begin. I got tired of
trying to talk
> over them so I tried the wait and talk at a normal voice. That worked
much better.
> And then I tried a quieter voice. It worked even better. I think the
kids are so
> used to hearing loudness that they enjoy a quiet voice. I have also
noticed that the
> quieter classroom teachers have the quieter classes. This is in
elementary. I'm not
> talking whisper, just quieter like two people would talk. Believe me,
the whole
> neighborhood knows when it's time for the kids to eat dinner. So this
was (is) a
> challenge for me. betsy
>
> LM Paris wrote:
>
> > I have been starting class with everyone in their seats....no supplies.
Same
> > thing I did with the Middle school last year. I stand ....and wait,
quietly for
> > their attention. I originally explain that I will talk when they are
quiet and
> > when I am done talking they have the rest of class to do their work and
by me
> > waiting they are wasting their own studio time. I was teaching in
block
> > scheduling last year and was worried what this "wait time" would do to
a 46 min.
> > class period....but it keeps getting better! They actually seem to get
more done
> > than if I dont talk in the beginning.
> >
> > Today, the student who usually causes some of the biggest distractions
in class
> > saw my dramatic waiting...if there is such a thing. He decided to
draw
> > attention to himself, as usual...but this time it helped me because he
yelled,
> > "Quiet everybody, Ms. Paris is trying to talk!!!!" Then he turned his
attention
> > on me. He got the attention and laughs and I GOT TO TALK!
> >
> > I truly do the "all pencils down and all eyes on me" if I have
something
> > important to tell them in the middle of class. I think it works
because I joke
> > with them so much they dont feel offended by this elementary school
tactic.
> >
> > Oh...one more thing that can save a ton of headaches is counting by
> > five's...every five seconds of yours they waste they have to make up at
the END
> > of class...AFTER THE BELL! It works really well at clean up time. If
they are
> > ALL cleaned up and in their seats I count the seconds starting before
the bell.
> > And yes...the whole class waits. This gets them to tell each other to
stop
> > talking.
> >
> > Again...not going to work for everyone, but it might for some....
> >
> > LM
> >
> > ricki fromkin wrote:
> >
> > > Donald Peters wrote:
> > > >
> > > > If you talk in a quiet voice, they
> > > > >will be quiet to hear you.
> > > >
> > > > I don't know where or who you teach, but if you are working with
> > > > minority/poverty students, this approach WILL NOT WORK. Trust me.
> > >
> > >
> > > Speaking of ideas of getting your students to listen and pay
> > > attention...any suggestions on getting HS kids to be quiet. Flipping
> > > the light on and off helps, but was wondering what else some of you
> > > might be doing.
> > >
> > > Ricki
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 19:39:43 -0600
> From: Dennis Freeman <freemad>
> Subject: Re: Dumbing down is driving me NUTS!
>
> You are both right - real self esteem comes from real achievement and
> effort. I think too many schools are like this and have misguided
policies,
> whether it's treating art as different than other disciplines or
"building"
> up kids by lowering the bar. I teach in a rural high school with a staff
of
> 3 art teachers. Through lots of ups & downs & administrative / board
> changes, our enrollment has stayed high & kids have stayed engaged. I
think
> the biggest reasons for this are: 1. High standards that are communicated
> clearly; 2. Teachers with well-developed technical skills and a love for
the
> subject matter, and; 3. Subversion of school policies which don't promote
> real learning and student responsibility (I mean it - that's why I have a
> door on my room!) Kids want this - they flock to our department, and
many
> kids do well there who are bored & (therefore) difficult in other
classes.
> Since you are in a new school, see yourself as a pioneer, a rebel, an
> explorer! If they won't let you give "real" grades, redefine & make more
> rigorous the ones you are allowed to mark. If kids aren't up to grade
level,
> don't blame the kids or yourself - just go to work! The kids will follow
if
> you challenge them & make it fun. Of couse, it can't be fun if you
aren't
> happy. I wish you the best - I know how difficult it can be to work in a
> situation where you don't agree w/ the school philosophy. Last thing -
find
> your allies! You are NOT the only one on your staff who feels this way.
> Find the others, then form a cell - a subversive cell. Share ideas for
> challenging kids that skirt the official policy, plot ways to celebrate
REAL
> achievement, undermine the culture of mediocrity! Good luck!
> - ----- Original Message -----
> From: ricki fromkin <fromkinr>
> To: Lisa Skeen <lpskeen@living-tree.net>
> Cc: <artsednet.edu>
> Sent: Monday, October 25, 1999 7:12 PM
> Subject: Re: Dumbing down is driving me NUTS!
>
>
> > Lisa Skeen wrote:
> > >
> > > Y'all, I confess I'm just about ready to quit this job. I have never
> > > been so frustrated over anything in my life as I am about having to
> > > dumb down (it seems like) everything I do because the kids in my
> > > school aren't up to grade level. Is this my fault (or that of any
> > > other teacher in my school)? No; we are a brand new school, and
> > > dealing with the product of the local public school system. Is any
> > > kid going to do better unless you push him to do better? No.
> > >
> > > I'm not allowed to give a student a zero (even if he's earned it), I
> > > have to give him a grade of sixty nine (the high end of the F grade
> > > range) instead, because a zero is not an F and is too hard to recover
> > > from. (Go figure on that one.)
> > >
> > > I'm not allowed to give a 2 page paper assignment to 3rd grade
> > > because "that's too much for them." This, in a school where there's
> > > supposed to be 30 minutes of homework per day per subject. Last time
> > > I looked, Art was a subject.
> > >
> > > Now I'm not going to be allowed to give real grades to any of the
> > > classes. We had agreed that K-2 would get E,S,or N grades, and 3 - 5
> > > and eventually - 8 would get letter grades. Now, 3 days before
report
> > > card day, my principal is taking a poll of the other 2 specialists,
> > > and asking other school principals what THEY're doing, and I'm going
> > > to end up having to give ESN grades to all levels. What this says to
> > > me is, "Art is not important enough to warrant a grade".
> > >
> > > Supposedly there is a law that says I have to do all this dumbing
> > > down. Joe Kid can have a conference with his parent and the special
> > > ed teacher and they decide that every grade has to be curved for Joe,
> > > to whatever degree such that, for example, if he makes an 80 I have
to
> > > call it an A. This is not fair to the other kids, much less to Joe,
> > > who could do the work if somebody would insist that he do it instead
> > > of playing around all the time.
> > >
> > > I am just about ready to explode. Or maybe implode. I'm sure it'll
> > > be whichever does the least damage to anyone else, or the least good
> > > either. :(
> > >
> > Lisa,
> >
> > I really feel for you. I myself wonder in amazement about our
education
> > system. Why is it such a problem to ask our students to work hard in
> > order to achieve success? I'm teaching Art Foundations in an urban HS
> > where the students are totally catered to without doing anything to
earn
> > this reward? I know my school is trying to build many student's self
> > esteem, since a good number of them have grown up without a stable home
> > environment. This is good, but I believe self esteem is built around
> > personal achievement in doing a job or task well, getting a good grade,
> > etc. By excusing students from learning or making things too easy for
> > them, schools are actually hurting these kids in the long run. They're
> > going to have a hell of a time in the real world coping with all life
> > has to offer. It really is disheartening working in this environment.
> > Sometimes I think I'd rather not teach than to become a part of a
system
> > that doesn't promote constructive learning, or simply that I don't
> > believe in. Do you think most schools are like this?
> >
> > Ricki
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #1806
> ********************************
>
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