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Lesson Plans


Art club

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Kerin Allen (kallen.edu)
Wed, 21 Oct 1998 15:12:40 -0700


Susan,
I am so glad you were able to rise above the ugly response you
received. I commend you greatly for organizing an art club with such a
wide range. I held a 7 week workshop with a K-6 range and learned a
huge lesson in student capabilities. I split the groups into K-3 and
4-6 on large cafeteria tables just so I could zip through each section
to help them according to grouped capabilities. Sounds like you are
doing well in this area.
Certification does not a teacher make. I am working towards my
certification as we speak but I still get out into the field to get the
'real' experience needed to understand how to make connections with
students. Some lessons are not learned in those temples of higher
education.
As far as sequencing your activities, it seems you have a good grasp
and are working on building the next activity on what is already
learned. You could progress from black/white drawing (pencil, charcoal,
white chalk/black paper, conte crayon) to color drawing (colored pencil
and chalk, pastels) then into the wet medium same venue. Draw with ink
on a chop stick then introduce ink washes. Go into watercolor using the
same techniques (wet on wet, dry brush, special effects etc). From
here, maybe collage.
If you want to get into 3-D, start with wire sculpture akin to line
drawings, then draped wire and onto sculpture.
Perhaps weaving would be a natural progression from drawings with
color. Start with black/white fiber or material then go into monochrome
finally into polychrome colors. Maybe work with the psychology of color
and personal exploration of the 'feel' of color.
These are only some top-of-my-head thoughts. Please look them over
an accept my admiration for your efforts to organize your club into more
than a recreational activity.
Good luck.
Kerin Allen
kallen.edu