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Lesson Plans


ID:UA

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Peggy Woolsey (woolspeg)
Thu, 8 Oct 1998 22:18:51 +0800


Linda wrote:

> Children's art making experiences, and the resulting
>products, are not intended to be "real" cultural objects or authentic
>cultural experiences, but aids to help students:
> understand art elements and principles
> develop skills in a variety of art making techniques
> recognize and appreciate artistic conventions of particular cultures
> understand how culture groups created similar products
> understand the historical and social context in which such objects
>were created
> recognize and appreciate similarities and differences in the basic
>needs of people of diverse cultures...

Why do we assume that the "products" of cultures other than our own
are "artistic conventions?" How can we really understand the historical and
social context in which such objects were created when we can only view
them from the distinct references of our own cultures? Have you ever
noticed how many pronouncements are made about prehistoric cave art? Almost
every reference to this art comes with the real reason why this art was
made. The truth is, we don't know the real reason, but the mystery is
wonderful. Peggy