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Lesson Plans


Re: A&E.A

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
Curt Stinson (curt)
Wed, 22 Oct 1997 23:37:24 -0700


artsednet-digest wrote:
>
> artsednet-digest Wednesday, October 15 1997 Volume 02 : Number 407
>
> This edition includes :
> Teddy story
> Re: totem poles
> A&E.O
> Social Restoration
> A
> a&e.o
> a&e.o: Hellooooo everyone!!!
> A
> a&e.o
> a&e.o
> a&e.o-environmental design
> A&E.O
> Life-centered issues
> A&E-O
> a&e.o
> A&E.O
> issue
> a&e.o
> Karl-You know Who You Are!
> social restoration
> A&E.O-environmental design
> A&E.A Arcosanti as art?
> Deep totem poles
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 15 Jun 1997 11:32:58 -0400
> From: diane medve <staley.30>
> Subject: Teddy story
>
> I got excited when I read Judith's message that included the story from
> Tony Campolo, because I participated in an internship with his
> organization in Philadelphia. He is such a dramatic and motivating
> speaker and i am pleased to share his stories with others also. Thanks
> for the encouraging story.
> Mindy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 10:24:55 -0500
> From: "Clair/Lily Kerns" <CWKerns>
> Subject: Re: totem poles
>
> >>>> But using plastic buckets, or paper
> bags somehow doesn't acknowledge the importance of the use and
> understanding of wood by the northwest coast peoples. Theys used every
> part of the cedar tree: roots, inner bark, twigs and trunk. From the cedar
> and other trees came house planks used for huge communal houses, posts
> often 100 feet in length, large and small canoes, storage boxes that held
> food supplies (made from steamed planks with fitted bottoms and lids, sewn
> with bark thread), tool handles, clothing, baskets, mats and hats. These
> peoples were not only incredible carvers, they were painters,their
> exquisite designs found on many of the above item. Only this kind of
> contact with a medium wood provide an opportunity for such full sculpture
> as seen in totem carvings.
> >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
>
> True. On the other hand, they were using what was plentiful/available in
> their culture to make meaningful items. Would using wood be as meaningful
> to us? Can we somehow give meaning to what is available and familiar to
> us? Can their meaning be "translated" into a medium and/or form more
> familiar to us?
>
> Just a thought....
>
> Lily
>
> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
> Lily Kerns CWKerns
> Church-- http://198.139.157.15/fumcmarionvilleumw
> Art Teachers--http://www.geocities.com/EnchantedForest/Dell/9575
> Personal-- http://members.tripod.com/~LilyK/
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:34:45 -0500
> From: Daisy <reynolds.162>
> Subject: A&E.O
>
> Hey all,
>
> Well, here at Ohio State we are examining issues that could be used in
> a classroom. I am working with Melanie Elek. Our issue is human and
> animal interaction. We want to focus on the negative ways that humans
> affect animals and how it has changed with time. For example, the
> paintings in the Caves of Lascaux are thought to be a hunting journal
> (or at least that's one opinion), so this deals with how humans kill
> animals for food. William Wegman's art work deals with the lost
> identity of animals because he personifies the dogs that he
> photographs. Humans, in general, have forced animals to lose their wild
> identity by domesticating them, sticking them into zoos, etc. Our main
> focus will be put on Luis Jimenez's sculpture, "Howl". This piece is
> about how humans have taken away animals' natural habitat to make room
> for themselves.
>
> Well, that's about it.
>
> See ya,
> Shawna
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:38:07 +0000
> From: Justy Elizabeth Palmer <palmer.179>
> Subject: Social Restoration
>
> Hi! I've found a little more information on Social Restoration. Let me
> know if you have any information that would help me! Thanks!
>
> Social Restoration involves changes in the relationship humans have to
> the natural world. It also includes environmental changes and changes
> in ourselves. It's about prompting people to become involved in their
> communities.
>
> Over the course of time humans involvement with the natural environment
> has become secondary, especially in industrial and post-industrial
> societies.
> 
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:37:40 -0500
> From: Jennifer Kale <kale.6>
> Subject: A
>
> Our names our Jennifer and Chad. What's up, this is Jennifer, I am a
> mountain biking enthusiast and a dog lover. And I'm Chad. I work with
> an autistic child and would like to go into art therapy or social work.
> We've just signed on to Artsednet today here at OSU. Currently we're
> exploring the issue of rape and domestic violence dealt with in art. We
> would appreciate the guidance of anyone who could point us in the right
> directon of some images. We look forward to hearing from all of you.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:38:07 -0400
> From: diane medve <medve.2>
> Subject: a&e.o
>
> Hey out there.....I'm a grad student in art ed taking Don Krug's class
> on social and cultural factors in art ed at OSU. I'd like some feedback
> on an issue which interests me, that of Ecological Design. I will use
> the artwork of Andy Goldsworthy to show children how nature and seasonal
> changes affect them in the communities in which they live. Andy
> Goldsworthy uses the land and nature, more specifically changes in the
> seasons, as a media for artistic expression. I believe children will
> learn from his work through experiencing the seasonal changes and
> viewing his installations either in books, online, or if possible in
> person. I want the children to learn more about change through reading
> about those changes and doing projects which involve natural objects.
> I hope to hear from an interested party soon. Talk to you
> soon!! Diane
> Medve
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:41:10 -0400
> From: emily aldredge <aldredge.2>
> Subject: a&e.o: Hellooooo everyone!!!
>
> We are students at the Ohio State University exploring the issue of
> environmental design. Specifically, we are interested in how the
> environment can be merged with art creating an increased public
> awareness about our surroundings. One of our objectives is to show
> students how the environment can be used as an artistic medium to
> recreate public space. In addition, we hope that students will learn
> how tho create an asthetic environment by transforming their ideas about
> the role of art in public places.
> We would appreciate any feedback on this topic that you would have to
> offer.
>
> Sincerely,
> Anne Marie Noge (noge.1)
> Emily Aldredge (aldredge.2)
> OSU Department of Art Ed
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:43:12 -0500
> From: Jennifer Kale <kale.6>
> Subject: A
>
> I am exploring the topic of domestic violence, specifically dealing with
> the issue of why someone would stay in an abusive relationship.
> Students will learn about the Cycle of violence, learned helplessness,
> and some other reasons of why people stay in abusive relations. I am
> also going to show an artwork of Barbara Kruger, which deals with some
> of the aspects of domestic violence. If anyone has any teaching
> suggestions please help me.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:49:45 -0500
> From: holly parsells <parsells.2>
> Subject: a&e.o
>
> Hello Everyone.
> We are here at ohio state and we are learning how to develop lesson
> plans based on an issue we found on the web. We chose the Arcosanti
> developed by Paolo Soleri. Arcosanti's purpose is to improve the living
> conditions in urban areas and reduce the destruction of the earth's
> resources. The Arcosanti project is designed to be a pedestrian style
> city which would eliminate transportation costs. Both the city and
> natural environments would be contained and therefore theive. What are
> you opinions on this issue? Do you think it is a good thing to try to
> design the perfect community? Or do you feel people would become
> isolated from the rest of the world? Send your thoughts, we would enjoy
> hearing from anyone!!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:49:54 +0000
> From: Justy Elizabeth Palmer <palmer.179>
> Subject: a&e.o
>
> Hi! I found a little more information on my isse. Let me know if
> anyone finds any information that would help me!
> Thanks!
> Justy Palmer
>
> Social Restoration involves changes in the relationship humans have to
> the natural world. It also includes environmental changes and changes
> in ourselves. It is also about prompting people to become involved in
> their communities.
>
> Over the course of time humans involvement with the natural environment
> has become secondary, especially in industrial and post-industrial
> societies.
> 
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:41:11 -0400
> From: brett ferancy <ferancy.2>
> Subject: a&e.o-environmental design
>
> I have been exploring the importance of preserving historical sites.
> One artist that has been faced this issue in the art world is Alan
> Sonfist. This issue seems like it should be confronted and used in the
> classroom for many reasons. One significant idea is that it will open
> students eyes to historical sites in their personal life and give them
> the idea that we should respect nature. If you have any input about
> this artist, issue or related issues please send me an e mail.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sun, 15 Jun 1997 11:50:48 -0400
> From: Anthony Kopp <kopp.16>
> Subject: A&E.O
>
> Thanks to everyone who posted ideas about landform artists. Here is a
> summary of the lesson that I have decided on:
>
> I have chosen three artists whose art deals with manipulation of the
> environment. They are Christo, Stan Herd and Robert Smithson. I am
> looking at the works "Wrapped Coast, Spiral Jetty and Herd's field
> portrait of a native American." My main focus is to look at the
> processes which they work, the possibility of environmental damage (both
> long and short term), the morality of creating such works and any steps
> that the artists may take to prevent or correct damage. If anyone has
> suggestions or information about the artists, please e-mail me.
>
> Thanks again,
> Tony Kopp
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:56:50 -0500
> From: Chad Disbennett <disbennett.5>
> Subject: Life-centered issues
>
> I'm in Dr.Krug's class at OSU and were are exploring life-centered
> issues. Below is portion of my paper.
>
> <fontfamily><param>Times_New_Roman</param><bigger><bigger>In this
> country over four million women are abused each year. Domestic
> violence is an act of abuse that includes the physical or mental abuse
> of a spouse, family member or intimate which stems from a desire by the
> perpetrator for control over the victim or survivor. Either party can
> be a family member, wife, husband, girlfriend, boyfriend or life
> partner. However, ninety-five percent of the reported cases involve
> the abuse of a woman. This issue is much more common than the average
> person would realize. The American Medical Association estimates one
> in four women will be battered by a partner at some point in their
> lifetime. Because this issue is now a "social taboo" it has been
> overlooked and understated for as long as it has been an unacceptable
> facet of our culture. And, because the dynamics at play in cases of
> domestic violence are not openly discussed many individuals are
> ignorant of the reasons in which why someone would choose to stay in an
> abusive relationship. It is not so simple for someone in an abusive
> relationship to "just leave."</bigger></bigger></fontfamily>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:53:26 -0500
> From: Melanie Elek <elek.5>
> Subject: A&E-O
>
> Attention art ed. fans!
> We are begining to develop lesson plans around issues. Our
> issue is around Ecological restoration, more specifically, Human and
> animal interaction. We decided to generate conversation among students
> to include current community issues dealing with our negative impact on
> animals. This could include, construction of housing developments, new
> highway projects, ect. Then discuss what we do to help the animal
> kingdom ie. zoos and parks. Ask them how many good versus bad
> environments we have in the community. If we decide our community needs
> help figure out ways to do that. Show the students ways that popular
> artist make statements around this issue. We found artist such as
> Jimenez, Wegman and Lascaux paintings. What is important that the
> students get the awareness on how we impact our environment and what we
> can do to change that. After all of our inquiry we will use our
> generated ideas to create art work. I thought of taking a walk around
> our environment and documenting all that needs improved. Then later
> writing a criticm that talks about how to improve it. Write now I am
> just generating ideas and looking for opinions about my issue and how to
> apply it into a lesson.
> Thanks,
> Melanie
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:53:31 -0400
> From: megan evans <evans.484>
> Subject: a&e.o
>
> When I began looking at the issues involved with social restoration I
> had a general idea through studying the work of both Rick Lowe and Ann
> Hamilton. Since then I have focused more on the project directed by
> Rick Lowe. In an age when it seems as though the community is taking a
> back seat to technology, it was refreshing that even the businesses in
> the community pitched in materials, time, and money. In my
> multicultural class today, I also have come to understand the importance
> that collaboration has in bringing people together.
> The connections with the past are also important since it takes us back
> to our roots, and our own upbringings. Many children are now being
> raised in day care, because parents need to working in order to "give
> them a better life".
> I really like the idea that art can work to help resolve the issues
> that are affecting us today. Does anyone agree with me, or what do you
> think about these ideas?
>
> Megan Evans
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:52:13 -0500
> From: Daniel McElwain <mcelwain.8>
> Subject: A&E.O
>
> Howdy,
>
> I am interested in the breakdown of community as a side effect of the
> involvement of technology in everyday lives. It seems that as computers
> draw us all closer together, the need for human interaction is less and
> less. The more connected we are the more lonely we become. Interesting
> paradox and the community suffers.
>
> Dan
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:56:46 +0000
> From: tiffany kee <kee.4@ohio-state.edu>
> Subject: issue
>
> Hello. I am Tiffany, and I am an art education student at ohio state.
> One of my classes is discussing the issue of public controll and
> influence on a public works sculpture. How much does the artist have to
> compromise if the public does not accept the work? Please send ideas
> and feedback. I will look forward to hearing from you .
> Thanks!
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:53:13 +0100
> From: Kate Menke <menke.12>
> Subject: a&e.o
>
> I am looking at the issue of social reconstruction, specifically Ann
> Hamilton's privation and excesses. I would like to be able to "teach"
> this issue to a class of 9th graders. The idea that people today are
> alienating themselves in their relentless persuit of money.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 11:57:59 -0400
> From: Peggi_Stevens@brooklin-es.u76.k12.me.us (Peggi Stevens)
> Subject: Karl-You know Who You Are!
>
> <bold>artsednet=40pub.getty.edu,Internet writes:
>
> </bold><x-quoted> =22KARL MILLER=22 <<Karl-EvMiller=40worldnet.att.net></x-=
> quoted>
>
> Dear Karl: Stand up for yourself-if seasonal art is not what you're about, =
> then you do the lessons you have planned. You are not a fill in for spare t=
> ime. You are a professional that teaches a discipline that none of us have =
> realistic time to teach anyway. Be professional and nice and convey that ar=
> t is more than a pilgrim's hat, although hats can be wonderful scupture, an=
> d/or design projects. Ask the classroom teacher if they could help you out =
> by introducing design concepts etc. See what they say? :-)
>
> Hang in there, it does get better. Peggi=20
>
> This message sent using the FirstClass SMTP/NNTP Gateway for Mac OS.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 12:12:02 -0500
> From: Kristie Moore <moore.542>
> Subject: social restoration
>
> Hey, Hey, Hey!!!
> I am currently focusing on the issue of social restoration. I have
> looked at a work by Buster Simpson called "Host Analog". This piece
> deals with a small scale solution to re-forrestation. He has planted
> seedlings in the core of a rotting tree that was the victim of
> lumbering. Simpson has taken an issue like deforrestation and
> thoughtfully approached it with a pro-active remedy. I am interested in
> how to encourage solutions to community issues in a similar manner.
> If anyone has something that relates either on an envirnmental theme
> or any other theme that could be taught and then implemented in a
> community through a school/ classroom.
> Also, if you have any cool lesson plans that you find exciting I'd
> love to hear from you!
> Thanks,
> Kris-T
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 13:21:18 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Jui-Ying Huang <huang.220>
> Subject: A&E.O-environmental design
>
> Hi, there,
>
> After viewing James Mason's Topiary Park in Art&Ecology web site, I
> would like share what I thought with you guys.
> I like that artists display their great work on our living space. We
> can enjoy them without coming to a certain museum. It is so real to make art
> a part of everyday life. In Mason's Topiary Park, the idea is wonderful to
> provide a recreation place for everyone. But it seems not a good location,
> at the result, only homeless visit there. The original purpose is in vain.
> On the other hand, I think once a work of art is recognized as being public
> art, it should be taken care of by everyone. I don't mean to have everyone
> clean the park or prune the topiary. It should be covered by some fund
> (money from part of taxes or other contribution) to take good care of it.
> Let it always keep the shape of what it should be. At the end, I am
> >thinking is it natural or necessary to prune plants just for human's
> aesthetic needs.
> I will appreciate it if you can give me some comments or suggestions
> about my ideas. Thank you. It will help me a lot for the further designing
> the issure presentation.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 13:22:45 -0400 (EDT)
> From: MARKG710
> Subject: A&E.A Arcosanti as art?
>
> In reading about Paolo Soleri's Arcosanti community, I began to question if
> it should be considered ecological art.
>
> Is it not simply a long term human experiment that incorporates the ecology
> of the area into its architecture and living systems?
>
> I can see how the buildings of Arcosanti can be considered ecological art, as
> they have been constructed utilizing ecologically senstitive architecture.
> But are we to consider the lives of the inhabitants as a work of art also?
> And if we are, how can we categorize the Arcosanti experiment to compare it
> to other types of art? Is it an installation with human components? Or
> perhaps Arcosanti is an ongoing performance piece with no set ending.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> mark g.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Wed, 15 Oct 1997 14:53:32 +0800
> From: woolspeg (Peggy Woolsey)
> Subject: Deep totem poles
>
> >The children may NOT have the origional materials to work with but in
> >the process of actually making a totem pole, kachina,etc. they are
> >really learning alot about the culture and the history.
>
> Sandra, I think you've put your finger on it here. This is exactly
> what I question in the use of totem poles et al. How much are the children
> actually learning about the culture and the history of the people whose
> objects they are emulating? What in the process provides them with
> "insight?" If we want them to experience self-identification such as in
> making crests based on heraldic imagry, then perhaps there is something
> within their own cultures to substantiate this. Otherwise are we not making
> assumptions based on our own cultures (in the end) about other cultures for
> our own purposes? It's not really so deep, it's just the way it's always
> been done. And now there is re-evaluation of the way things have always
> been done.
> Having cedar to work with only begs the question.
>
> > They know that it is made of wood, but we
> >just want to try and duplicate it as best we can, with what we have.
> >They are learning in this process. Thats what we want.
>
> My question is, what are they learning in this process? Is it
> possible they are also learning that thousands of years of cultural
> evolution can be "duplicated" in an art or social studies unit? Are they
> learning that the symbolic content (interpreted) of a culture can be easily
> incorporated into our own? And, here's a wild projection (she said, pulling
> on her flameproofing gear):What if some Salish children on the NW coast, in
> their unit on Christianity, decided to make crucifixes out of toilet paper
> rolls and plastic buckets? Of course, they would study the history and
> culture of the Christian people. In three weeks.
> (disclaimer: I know that the crucifix and the totem pole are not equivalent
> or interchangeable! And that NW coast aboriginals practiced their craft
> many thousands of years before Christ was born,in what we call the stone
> age.) Peggy
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of artsednet-digest V2 #407
> *******************************
>
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> *ArtsEdNet web site: http://www.artsednet.getty.edu/In response to Holly Parsells, I have visited Paolo Soleri's Arcosanti
community. It was quite interesting. The community grew their own
food, no transporation unless by foot, and they supported themselves by
making these amazing bells (they were very expensive but beautiful).
Although they have contained the natural environment, I do not think it
is a good idea to try and design a perfect community. I really do not
think perfection is possible.

Susan Stinson
University of Arizona
curt


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