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Lesson Plans


Beating teacher blues

[ Thread ][ Subject ][ Author ][ Date ]
EVasso
Fri, 3 Oct 1997 17:56:31 -0400 (EDT)


BEATING TEACHER BLUES

Take a class.
Take a printmaking class at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.
Enter another degree program.
Go for your doctorate, but quit after taking all the interesting classes on
theory and philosophy on education.
No one would've read the disertation anyway.

Join a book club.
Start one.
Get your school district to give you all professional growth credit for doing
it.

Go out with a group of teachers every Friday for lunch at a local Thai
restaurant.
Go out Friday after work with a group of teachers to a great bar, sit around
and talk about teaching.
Start out by saying you donít want to talk about work, but talk about it
anyway.
Its what you do and its whatís important, so you talk about it.
After three beers, you start laughing about it.
A lot.
Mention to the others that your father still isnít quite sure what you
do...or why?

Come home on a beautiful midwest October Friday afternoon.
Its 85 degrees.
Get a beer.
Sit on the porch swing.
Think about the great projects you did with your students this week and about
how half of the kids thought half of the projects were pretty good.
Working on the clay mummies today, the sixth graders got quiet.
I didnít tell them to get quiet.
They just were.
Into the project.
It was pretty cool.

Get theater tickets.
Eat at a really good French bistro in Bucktown.
Sure, its too much money.
But what are you working for?

Start playing poker once a month for the next ten years with a group of
teacher friends.
Let their spouses/significant others play as long as they donít complain when
you all are talking about work after saying you didnít want to talk about
work tonight.

Keep a journal.
In the journal follow a kid from kindergarten through sixth grade.
Pretend its action research.
Its not, of course.
Its better than that.
Its what you do.

-Fred
Chicago